1962 Pms Written Exam

macrae
13th April 2008, 22:09
As I remember to have any chance of passing the exam you had to write as much as you knew on your chosen question, keep on writing till the time was up.

A bit different to present day exams where it seems often its a case of ticking boxes true or false.

K urgess
13th April 2008, 22:49
Well, I can still read it but it might as well be in Chinese.[=P]
I am surprised at the inclusion of a transistor question.
If I remember correctly transistors were funny little things that could be found inside the latest Marconi lifeboat transmitter and that was about all one needed to know.
My waffle on these subjects when taking my PMG2 allowed me the honour of having to take it again (twice). (Whaaa)

trotterdotpom
14th April 2008, 00:09
Macrae, you've only ticked 4 questions! I hope you answered more than that as there was no way of achieving 75% without answering 6 questions - how did you go?

I too was surprised at the inclusion of a transistor question in 1962. Also the frequency meter question - I don't recall ever receiving any instruction on that. What sort of readout would a frequency meter have had in those days? Surely not digital. A moving coil meter wouldn't have been too accurate, would it? The nearest I ever came to a frequency meter on a ship was a neon bulb taped to a ruler!

In an age when University students need remedial English classes, there seems to be no other option but Multiple Choice questions - that's why I always go to old doctors.

Sorry to be picky, but shouldn't the title be PMG rather than PMS? PMS is what the examiners suffered from!

The term PMS came into vogue in the late '80s and superceded PMT - that's why we had no qualms about naming our son Paul Michael. Unfortunately for him, PMT seems to have made a come back.

John T.

macrae
14th April 2008, 10:47
Macrae, you've only ticked 4 questions! I hope you answered more than that as there was no way of achieving 75% without answering 6 questions - how did you go?

I too was surprised at the inclusion of a transistor question in 1962. Also the frequency meter question - I don't recall ever receiving any instruction on that. What sort of readout would a frequency meter have had in those days? Surely not digital. A moving coil meter wouldn't have been too accurate, would it? The nearest I ever came to a frequency meter on a ship was a neon bulb taped to a ruler!

In an age when University students need remedial English classes, there seems to be no other option but Multiple Choice questions - that's why I always go to old doctors.

Sorry to be picky, but shouldn't the title be PMG rather than PMS? PMS is what the examiners suffered from!

The term PMS came into vogue in the late '80s and superceded PMT - that's why we had no qualms about naming our son Paul Michael. Unfortunately for him, PMT seems to have made a come back.

John T.
I FAILED !!

WAS GIVEN A THREE MONTH STUDY LEAVE FROM BP FOR THE EXAM. REMEMBER HAVING A GOOD TIME BUT NOT MUCH ABOUT THE EXAM.

THINK THE QUESTIONS TICKED WERE THE ONES I THOUGHT I HAD A CHANCE WITH.

YOUR RIGHT, SHOULD BE PMG.
PMS (planned maintenance service) ! am so used to writing it on work sheets when doing jobs in the hospitals.

trotterdotpom
14th April 2008, 13:04
Not to worry, Macrae, it's all academic now.

All that gear where you could just about see the sinewaves going in and out has been replaced by tiny plastic boxes with an input and an output - or am I even more out of date than I thought? I'm sure if you asked one of today's techs about a "crystal controlled oscillator", he would think it was a toy they use in a new age brothel.

I did get a 1st Class and, subsequently, job offers from British Rail and Townsend Ferries - declined both. Think it was worth a few extra quid a month but forget how much. One things for sure, I wouldn't pass that test now.

Have to say, the radio goniometer sounds a lot more palatable than the "umberella treatment" dished out in Glasgow's Southern General!

John T.

BA204259
14th April 2008, 13:08
the "umbarella treatment' dished out in Glasgow's Southern General!

John T.

Whatever can you mean? Did you ever have to speak those immortal words "can you cure this by Friday, Doc?"..(Jester)

trotterdotpom
14th April 2008, 13:24
Waste of time, BA - the punishment was part of the treatment, aaaaaaaaaagh!!!!!!!

Anything for the weekend, Sir?

John T.

jaydeeare
14th April 2008, 23:05
That paper takes me back, especially the old favourite of "With the aid of a circuit diagram, explain the action of....."

Failed my PMG twice :( After joining the RAF, I asked a classmate to post on the next exam paper. I could have passed that one, I'm sure!

In the RAF, we also had the 'vote for Joe' papers, and whilst only a lowly Leading Aircraftman (LAC - lowest Trade Rank) I got hold of a corporals exam paper, and could answer most of the questions easily. This really surprised everyone! Pity I had to wait to get to the point before I could take it, then they changed the format AND the passmark - 80% - got it though!

Still, my studies at Nautical College helped a great deal. I wouldn't be where I am now had it not been for the Sparks course :)

R651400
16th April 2008, 05:07
I too was surprised at the inclusion of a transistor question in 1962. Also the frequency meter question - I don't recall ever receiving any instruction on that. What sort of readout would a frequency meter have had in those days? Surely not digital. A moving coil meter wouldn't have been too accurate, would it?

Think one tranny question in 1962 is fair game.
Only frequency meter I saw at sea was '58 KGV London during a radio inspection. WW2 US built BC221. Still trying to work out why, when all ship's transmitters had moved to xtal control.
Xtal a wee bit out lad, it's on 500.0005 kc/s!

spongebob
16th April 2008, 07:44
Reading about transmitters on this thread, I am no radio buff but I do remember that after WW2 the army surplus stores were full of field transmitters called ZC1's.
Every guy who owned a boat bought one for a few quid to use in emergencies and even my father bought one with the intention of brushing up on his boy scout Morse code skills and whatever was needed to get a "Ham" licence.
I guess that they were steam radio by modern standards.
My Dad never made the grade, went off on another tack. He always said that hie epitaph shoud read;
"He lived a life of going to do and died with nothing done"

K urgess
16th April 2008, 13:12
There's a large general store down Hessle Road in Hull called Boyes that was a treasure trove of surplus during the 50s.
My first morse key was an RAF bathtub key that came from there along with numerous khaki map cases that seemd to always smell of mothballs and those most useful of all items, tank driver's periscopes. [=P]