Knowledge Test

flyer682
31st May 2005, 12:18
As we all know, Port Line ships were always named after ports on their schedules.
But, which port was the PORT CAROLINE named after??
I can visualize the Atlases coming out now.......... (Read)

Doug Rogers
31st May 2005, 13:05
I may be wrong but I thought that she named for Port Caroline in South Australia??, probably am wrong in thinking that!!.

david smith
31st May 2005, 13:43
Was Kingston SA a port used by such ships?

tanker
31st May 2005, 15:06
PORT CAROLINE with her sister PORT CHALMERS had the same life:the first
became MATRA -1983 and GOLDEN DOLPHIN and scrapped,the second became
MANAAR-1983 and GOLDEN GLORY and scrapped.
Gp

japottinger
31st May 2005, 20:27
Lacebede Bay South Australia

Dave Edge
1st June 2005, 00:41
I see Spong & Dobson in their recent book on Port Line give Lacebede Bay but I had always assumed it was after Caroline Bay, New Zealand, on which the port of Timaru stands.

trotterdotpom
1st June 2005, 10:23
My life is full of memorable booze ups - one of them was aboard Port Caroline in Auckland (about '76). I remember being told that she was the largest conventional freezer ship in the world ... the rest is history, hic...

John t.

Fairfield
1st June 2005, 14:31
PORTS CHALMERS and CAROLINE indeed shared that honour.

julian anstis
1st June 2005, 18:36
PORT CHALMERS on the Kiwi coast "oh boy what a party ship" .....remember her well.......she was very much responsible for blowing up the ICENIC early one morning.
I can remember going on board her one evening and being invited to partake in their kind hospitality of free drinks, the rest is slightly hazy......
Next thing I remember is the second steward calling us to turn to. Still feeling slightly groggy I went down to the crew washroom to get ready for duty. I filled the sink with the intention of wet shaving but after seeing the involuntary movements of the razor in my hand decided it would be safer to use my trusty old Remington ......."WRONG"!......to this day I cant remember how my electric razor ended up in the sink of water but I do know that you get the most amazing pyrotechnic display you'll ever see. I think the fact that the washroom was inboard with no ports made it look all the more spectacular as the lights went down. After evacuating the washroom in record time along with three other stewards one of whom was on the heads at the time, I was told I had to go and explain to the Chief Steward what had happened. As I approached his cabin the Chief Lecky (who had the looks and the build of Grizzly Adams) had beat me to it. I heard him saying to the Chief Steward that some pratt had done something that had blown the board's off the bulkhead down below and that there was unlikely to be any power to the galley for a while. For once in my life the words of my parents rang out.....dont interupt other peoples conversations......so being a polite first tripper I did'nt.......just the tone of his voice told me he was not a happy chappy. Close on his heel's were two other lecky's.....dont understand why three of them had to turn to early, just to replace a fuse. The outcome was that the Chief Steward with a handfull of various bottles had to go to the PORT CHALMERS berthed behind us and beg or plead with their cook to do another sixty breakfast's for us as well. As I was voted to being the cause of the problem It was down to me to transfer the breakfast's from the PORT CHALMERS to the ICENIC, salad got us through Lunchtime and by Dinner we had power restored to half the ship including the galley. I still blame the PORT CHALMERS for that incident, if she was'nt in port it would'nt have happened. To this day I have never owned and have no intention of owning or using an electric razor.

flyer682
2nd June 2005, 07:51
Great story, Julian. ;) That must have been hard work transferring all those breakfasts. You silly boy!! And of course, you've never had a drop of alcohol since. :p

flyer682
4th June 2005, 10:12
Dave Edge, you are correct. The last ship ever built for the Port Line was indeed named for Timaru.

EMMESSTEE
4th June 2005, 14:47
OK - you say Port Line named their ships after the ports on their schedules, from where did "Port Vindex" get her name?

EMMESSTEE.

waiwera
4th June 2005, 20:10
I think Port Vindex was a WW2 light aircraft carrier - reconverted after the war. Was she called HMS Vindex - Port Vindex??

stevecz
4th June 2005, 20:21
HMS Vindex, renamed Port Vindex later see the history on this site:
http://www.fleetairarmarchive.net/Ships/VINDEX.html

flyer682
5th June 2005, 02:53
PORT VINDEX was so named in honour of her wartime service as HMS VINDEX - there is no location named Port Vindex.

EMMESSTEE
6th June 2005, 15:19
Correct .... she was laid down for Port Line at Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson's, Newcastle 1943 and taken over on the stocks by the Admiralty and commissioned as HMS "Vindex". Her sistership was laid down at John Brown's, Clydebank 1941, taken over by the Admiralty in 1942 and completed in 1943 as HMS "Nairana". Both were rebuilt and entered Port Line service in 1949, the latter as "Port Victor" - named after Victor Harbor, overlooking Encounter Bay in South Australia.

EMMESSTEE

Mooney
13th June 2008, 10:53
Named after Caroline Bay in Timaru I believe sister ship to the Port chalmers.