British Queen

tanker
2nd June 2005, 16:52
BRITISH QUEEN,built 1959,32431 g.t.16 knots,in an impressive shot of the era.
(old pic collect.)

John_F
2nd June 2005, 17:29
Great picture of her on her trials off the Isle of Arran.
She was built by John Brown on the Clyde & launched by Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother in 1959. At the time, she was the largest tanker in the world, I believe.
I served on her in 1962 & she was my last ship as an (senior) apprentice.
I think she suffered a fire at sea sometime late in her life & the engineers' accommodation aft was gutted.
On one occasion coming through the Canal, she stopped at Port Said for a hull paint job. When it came to re-painting her name, the letter 'N' was replaced with an 'R'.....
Marine Superintendant at discharge port not best pleased.......
Finally scrapped in 1975 at Kaohsiung.

tanker
2nd June 2005, 17:34
Thanks JohnF, for all the addition innformations .
Gp

trevor page
11th May 2006, 09:56
Yes she did suffer a fire at sea, march 31st 65,Persian Gulf. I was in her at the time.

janbonde
11th May 2006, 21:47
Hi John-F I heard many years ago that something similar happened to the BR Workman,it was repainted Workhouse do not know if it was true,and never met anyone who could verify it

trevor page
11th May 2006, 23:13
Hi Salty, I was on the Workman in 66 and that same story was going around then, as far as i know its true. About 10 years ago I was chatting to a guy in a pub in west London, an ex seafarer; he was talking about said ship, "I'll tell you a story about the workman" says he to which I replyed "I know what your going to say". So there you are it's been going around for a few years.
Trevor.

John_F
12th May 2006, 09:50
Salty,

Like Trevor, I had also heard the story about the Workman but I don't know how true it is. There are others - Serenity to Senility springs to mind - but I think some of them were just nicknames rather than repaint jobs.
Kind regards,
John F.

jonsea
12th May 2006, 10:01
Yes, I think we've all heard the "Workman to Workhouse" tale; it was floating around when I was at sea. I was on the Spey when the "e" had faded off and we were trading around Europe as the British Spy . . . (Gleam)

B.Nicholson
10th May 2009, 16:20
Hi John-F I heard many years ago that something similar happened to the BR Workman,it was repainted Workhouse do not know if it was true,and never met anyone who could verify it

In Oct 61 I joined the Clyde Explorer on the the Tyne as AB. (really British Explorer but renamed by BP as a Tax dodge )With a mixed crowd of Geordies and Jocks. We were heading for a few months work on the Aussie Coast. At Port Said waiting for the Northbound Convoy to clear, we heard that The Workman was coming North. She was full of fellow Geordies and we all knew each other. As she passed us there was lots of screaming and shouting between ships,Great hilarity, and they were pointing to the backend. Then we started see the name as she passed !first the letter e the s and so on, esuohkrow hsitirb. Someone had been over the stern through the night coming through the canal.
So was very true.
We did 11 months on Explorer, 5 months on the Oz coast 2 months on the Indian coast. then between Abidan,Port Sudan,Mombasa and Aden for the rest. No A/C or Cold Water. Shitty little fan in each cabin. was Great fun. I got a DR for conduct and a VG for ability. Great days, I loved every minute.
To this day I still REFUTE my DR as the Capt Ch/Mate and Ch/eng were a trio of Pricks. 18 years later after doing all my tickets I took my first command as Captain, but certainly did have them as my role models.
So there you go Saltie LOL

david freeman
27th May 2009, 18:35
BRITISH QUEEN,built 1959,32431 g.t.16 knots,in an impressive shot of the era.
(old pic collect.) Was she or the 42,000DWT Duchess issued as the print on a pack of company playing cards.

briangdav
29th May 2009, 21:11
Saw her on fire at UM Said around end of 1966 early 1967

Billieboy
30th May 2009, 06:52
1973 Bremerhaven, she was the first "Out port", job I did for Cockburns at Lloyd Werft, full survey of maneuvering and Emergency valves. It seems that the Chief had bet the super DM20 that I wouldn't get the valves to operate in, "One-finger Mode", after I'd warmed through and set up the steam system did the usual tests and the Chief lost his 20mark note! The Super and I drank it at dinner, in the Hotel, that night. Met the Chief many years later in Rotterdam, he'd become a DTI surveyor and examiner, but he hadn't forgotten me!

Long gone
21st June 2009, 18:51
BRITISH QUEEN,built 1959,32431 g.t.16 knots,in an impressive shot of the era.
(old pic collect.)

First post on here!

This picture was on the wall of the dining room of the hostel at South Shields - I'm sorry I can't remember its name as it was so long ago (1970/71).

B & W photo, properly framed and mounted.

uskside
30th June 2009, 23:36
I was on British Queen July 1961 thro to December 1961.
Anyone out there who was on her about the same time

Graham Wallace
2nd July 2009, 18:48
I was on British Queen July 1961 thro to December 1961.
Anyone out there who was on her about the same time

I have a drydockcrew list when she left drydock March 1961, J/E's Dick Payne, David Jones and JR Henton were three of my buddies. Are you interested?

Graham

Graham Wallace
2nd July 2009, 18:58
Saw her on fire at UM Said around end of 1966 early 1967

Brian,

You are mixing her up with the Crown, which exploded August 20th 1966 at Umm Said.
You can see an article with photos on her in my website www.bpapprentices.com

Graham

James_C
2nd July 2009, 20:11
I have a drydockcrew list when she left drydock March 1961, J/E's Dick Payne, David Jones and JR Henton were three of my buddies. Are you interested?

Graham

Graham,
Was Dick Payne from Barrow (Cumbria) or thereabouts?
I'm sure I sailed with an E/Cdt a few years back by the name of James Payne and I think he mentioned his father had been with the company.

Graham Wallace
3rd July 2009, 00:00
Graham,
Was Dick Payne from Barrow (Cumbria) or thereabouts?
I'm sure I sailed with an E/Cdt a few years back by the name of James Payne and I think he mentioned his father had been with the company.

Jim,
Dick (RD) Payne came from Surbiton, 1955 E/A and died 2004.
I have note of MD Payne a 1960/61 E/A and an SD Payne 1972 E/C. There was also Brian H Payne ex BP C/E 1981/82, however I do not think he was an ex E/A
I think there is yet another Payne I have noted in some Ships Movements, but cannot find him at present.

Graham

uskside
3rd July 2009, 23:47
I have a drydockcrew list when she left drydock March 1961, J/E's Dick Payne, David Jones and JR Henton were three of my buddies. Are you interested?

Graham

Thanks for the above info, would they have sailed with her when I was aboard
Uskside

Graham Wallace
4th July 2009, 06:59
Thanks for the above info, would they have sailed with her when I was aboard
Uskside


That I do not know, it is most likely they joined at drydock so were starting out on her, in those times we stayed aboard for 6+ months so it is highly likely you were on at the same time. I do not have any further information on either of the 3 on that ship. I know Henton died in mid 1980's, a C/E.................a very heavy smoker I am told.

Graham

Burned Toast
4th July 2009, 11:16
Yes, I think we've all heard the "Workman to Workhouse" tale; it was floating around when I was at sea. I was on the Spey when the "e" had faded off and we were trading around Europe as the British Spy . . . (Gleam)

Was she not renamed alongside in Durban in the 60s(Jester) (Smoke)

william.marshall439
4th July 2009, 13:22
I thought the Workman name was changed in drydock on the Tyne, as they were supposed to put SY in front of the Phylis Bowater anyone got any knowledge of it.

OllieUK
4th July 2009, 15:59
"Phylis Bowater" great little ship, great wages, great run. (*))

TIM HUDSON
4th July 2009, 17:19
Was not the fire on the British Queen found to be arson and one of the ship's engineers charged and later found guilty at Old Bailey ??
Tim

John Paul
4th July 2009, 23:44
Hi.
Was it the British Queen that pulled the tug St.Levan over while leaving Silley Cox ship repair yard ,Falmouth. This would have been about 1962/63/
As I worked on the tug after she was raised and time has dulled the memory.

James MacDonald
5th July 2009, 01:18
I remember the British Queen tied up at Finnieston quay Glasgow around 1964 she was there for quiet a long time for repairs

John_F
5th July 2009, 01:24
Hi.
Was it the British Queen that pulled the tug St.Levan over while leaving Silley Cox ship repair yard ,Falmouth. This would have been about 1962/63/
As I worked on the tug after she was raised and time has dulled the memory.
John Paul,
Details here of 2 tugs sunk in Falmouth involving BP tankers. The British Queen was not one of them.
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=6340&highlight=falmouth
Kind regards,
John.

Graham Wallace
5th July 2009, 01:40
Was not the fire on the British Queen found to be arson and one of the ship's engineers charged and later found guilty at Old Bailey ??
Tim

You are correct, I know who it was but not sure whether he was an Eng Apprentice or J/E at the time, 1965 I think.
It seems he had a history, there were other events ,but were not realised deliberately set.

Graham

TIM HUDSON
5th July 2009, 21:29
Hello Graham
I too know a name as I used to have a beer with him many an evening in the Lookout pub in South Shields (both engineer apprentices at the College. His 'digs', a couple of streets away from the pub, mysteriously went on fire one day and said person was front page praised in the Shields Gazette (local rag) for rescuing children from next door house. He appeared that evening with bandaged hands and was quite the hero. It wasn't until some year or two later I saw an item on his trial (for British Queen incident) in a broadsheet, naming him, that naturally gave me suspicions of 'digs' do. Wonder if he's still at sea !!!!
rgds
Tim

iainr
5th July 2009, 23:00
Was E/A on the Queen between7/ 62 and 11/62 when I was transferred to the Holly from Mina

Brent Pyburn
28th July 2009, 10:44
Was not the fire on the British Queen found to be arson and one of the ship's engineers charged and later found guilty at Old Bailey ??
Tim

I joined Br Queen in I.O.G in October 66 and left 9 months later. The fire you are referring to happened in 1964 and I heard it was a disgruntled cadet. (Cloud)

TIM HUDSON
28th July 2009, 11:11
Brent
thats about right, fits in with my recollections. I knew him quite well...or rather thought I did !! Think it must have been more than disgruntled as looks as though there was several instants of 'previous'.
tim

david freeman
31st July 2009, 11:31
Before the voyage of The B Queen fire I joined at Finnart and as i went up the gangplank the lads where going ashore. Among the post was a football coupon to Littlewoods, The Bosun, mate, 3/e, Elect, and 3 others. We sailed on the THursday on the saturday they had won first divy for a total of 45k: Not bad! The fire happened at or during light ship as the ship approched the Quoins: All the engineers accommodation aft was gutted, and Scotland Yard were involved on the passage home. The culprit was arrested and taken to Bowstreet and chaged: The result I do not remember but the ship discharged at IOG and dydocked on the clyde at Greenock.

Ryder
13th August 2009, 03:01
Hi John,
I think the incident you mention was either January or February 1960. I had just joinedthe Splendour as first trip apprentice, when the accident happened, but it was one of the 32's not the Queen, but I can't remember which one. St Levan was the stern tug and got beam on as the pilot went ahead on the enigines, we watched go over on her beam ends then sink. BP crew were not flavour of the month ashore that night !!
Tony White

John_F
13th August 2009, 11:45
Hi Tony,
This incident involved the British Justice, as you say, one ofthe 32s.
Kind regards,
John.

Robert Nicholson
20th August 2009, 03:07
Brent
thats about right, fits in with my recollections. I knew him quite well...or rather thought I did !! Think it must have been more than disgruntled as looks as though there was several instants of 'previous'.
tim

If we are all talking about the same guy he was from Doncaster or that area. I was on the British Aviator at the time of the Queen fire. Am sure he was my Ch Eng lots of years later working for Smit International in Singapore. He was out of arson then, but just liked to try and wreck ships, grief he caused me , whow.Last time I saw him I was going to kill him, what an evil man he was. I can honestly say he was really mentally disturbed. In 94 i joined the smit Lloyd 106 in dry dock in Singapore. Next morning we come out of dry dock nice and easy, then shot ahead then total blackout heading towards a gas tanker. The Singaporean Engineering Supt who was on on bridge with me at the time shot down to eng room and got us started again in secs. Hell we were seconds from causing a major disaster.
I am not joking when I say he was a total madman. He was. Am not saying to much on this .

Graham Wallace
20th August 2009, 21:00
If we are all talking about the same guy he was from Doncaster or that area. I was on the British Aviator at the time of the Queen fire. Am sure he was my Ch Eng lots of years later working for Smit International in Singapore. He was out of arson then, but just liked to try and wreck ships, grief he caused me , whow.Last time I saw him I was going to kill him, what an evil man he was. I can honestly say he was really mentally disturbed. In 94 i joined the smit Lloyd 106 in dry dock in Singapore. Next morning we come out of dry dock nice and easy, then shot ahead then total blackout heading towards a gas tanker. The Singaporean Engineering Supt who was on on bridge with me at the time shot down to eng room and got us started again in secs. Hell we were seconds from causing a major disaster.
I am not joking when I say he was a total madman. He was. Am not saying to much on this .

Yup, he came from Doncaster.
How did he ever go to sea again with a record like that? I know someone who knew him and actually went to his trial in London.

Graham

Robert Nicholson
20th August 2009, 23:21
Yup, he came from Doncaster.
How did he ever go to sea again with a record like that? I know someone who knew him and actually went to his trial in London.

Graham

Graham, IF? it is the same bloke then he finished up as Ch/Eng. I think he only lasted with Smit for about a month if that. I was only on the 106 for about a week then got transfered to the Smit Madura in Thailand assisting with a cable laying job. That man was so much trouble,was just unbeleivable. I would have swung for him. Just a lunatic. I think I could write a book about the XXXX.
Rob

TIM HUDSON
20th August 2009, 23:33
I feel bad about having occasional pints with him all those years ago now.! Dont recall him being such a nutter then. Maybe McEwans Best Scotch hid his real self.!
tim

Robert Nicholson
21st August 2009, 01:47
I feel bad about having occasional pints with him all those years ago now.! Dont recall him being such a nutter then. Maybe McEwans Best Scotch hid his real self.!
tim

Tim, I dont want to get into this too much on here, but that bloke was like on a mission from hell. He was also suspect and involved on at least 4 other BP tanker fires. The Queen if my memory serves right,was his last. fire was in the Lazerette.. Long time ago Mems fading but not when I was with him in Smit.
Rob

Michael Parkes
24th August 2009, 19:20
Hi Tony,
This incident involved the British Justice, as you say, one ofthe 32s.
Kind regards,
John.

This has been on a thread here before.

British Sailor was the first incident at Falmouth and British Justice on the second occassion.

The master of the tug died last year aged 88. Follows is an extract from a local Falmouth newspaper which I have copied for you interest.

Flags fly at half mast in memory of ex-tug master
12:05pm Wednesday 18th June 2008


Flags are flying at half-mast on the Falmouth harbour tugs this week in memory of former tug master Gordon Martin, who has died in Hampshire, aged 88.
Gordon left school at 14 and went on to become a professional skipper on the Sunbeam yachts. During his days in yachting circles, Gordon achieved international skipper status sailing on the six-metre yachts Flya, Naushaba, and Yeoman. He was mastheadman on the 12-metre Little Astra.
His father Gordon Fleetwood Martin sailed on Sir Thomas Lipton's five J Class Shamrocks. Gordon joined the Falmouth Towage Company in 1941 at the age of 21 - four years later he was made up to skipper. For 33 years he had command of many of the Falmouth tugs including a long spell on the Codicote Scot, the former German tug Bruno Dreyer.
In February 1960, Gordon had command of the tug St Levan (Codicote Scot) when she was pulled over and sunk by the tanker British Justice in the docks basin. All of the five man crew were picked up by a French fishing boat. He was completely exonerated from all blame by a Board of Enquiry.
During the Queen's Silver Jubilee tour of the UK, the Royal Yacht Britannia visited Falmouth. Gordon was on the lead tug St Eval which helped berth the Royal Yacht.
Gordon worked in the halcyon days of the port, through the war and post war, when the age of the super tanker put new demands on the skills of tug masters and their crews. He served in many of the tugs both steam and motor.
A very talented artist Gordon honed his artistic skills at the Falmouth School of Art at the age of 16. Whenever a Falmouth tug man retired, Gordon always presented him with drawing of the man's favourite tug.
A consummate professional, Gordon was always immaculately dressed in a suit and peaked cap when skippering his tug. His brother Ivor Martin and brother-in-law Roy Coote spent most of their working lives in Falmouth Towage all serving as tug masters.
Gordon leaves a daughter Una, grandson Martin, sister Joan and a brother Ivor

Michael

Michael Parkes
24th August 2009, 19:22
This has been on a thread here before.

British Sailor was the first incident at Falmouth and British Justice on the second occassion.

The master of the tug died last year aged 88. Follows is an extract from a local Falmouth newspaper which I have copied for you interest.

Flags fly at half mast in memory of ex-tug master
12:05pm Wednesday 18th June 2008


Flags are flying at half-mast on the Falmouth harbour tugs this week in memory of former tug master Gordon Martin, who has died in Hampshire, aged 88.
Gordon left school at 14 and went on to become a professional skipper on the Sunbeam yachts. During his days in yachting circles, Gordon achieved international skipper status sailing on the six-metre yachts Flya, Naushaba, and Yeoman. He was mastheadman on the 12-metre Little Astra.
His father Gordon Fleetwood Martin sailed on Sir Thomas Lipton's five J Class Shamrocks. Gordon joined the Falmouth Towage Company in 1941 at the age of 21 - four years later he was made up to skipper. For 33 years he had command of many of the Falmouth tugs including a long spell on the Codicote Scot, the former German tug Bruno Dreyer.
In February 1960, Gordon had command of the tug St Levan (Codicote Scot) when she was pulled over and sunk by the tanker British Justice in the docks basin. All of the five man crew were picked up by a French fishing boat. He was completely exonerated from all blame by a Board of Enquiry.
During the Queen's Silver Jubilee tour of the UK, the Royal Yacht Britannia visited Falmouth. Gordon was on the lead tug St Eval which helped berth the Royal Yacht.
Gordon worked in the halcyon days of the port, through the war and post war, when the age of the super tanker put new demands on the skills of tug masters and their crews. He served in many of the tugs both steam and motor.
A very talented artist Gordon honed his artistic skills at the Falmouth School of Art at the age of 16. Whenever a Falmouth tug man retired, Gordon always presented him with drawing of the man's favourite tug.
A consummate professional, Gordon was always immaculately dressed in a suit and peaked cap when skippering his tug. His brother Ivor Martin and brother-in-law Roy Coote spent most of their working lives in Falmouth Towage all serving as tug masters.
Gordon leaves a daughter Una, grandson Martin, sister Joan and a brother Ivor

Michael

Incidently I was on the British Justice for two trips, one before and one after the Falmouth incident. At the time of the disaster I was on the British Soldier

Michael

John_F
24th August 2009, 23:59
Michael,
Many thanks for those details.
As a matter of interest (?), I visited Falmouth last week for the first time since my time with BP - 45 years ago. I went mainly to visit a photographic shop called Image Delivery in Webber Street who have a vast database of ships that have visited Falmouth, although not all catalogued so searching for a particular vessel is a nightmare. However, I have registered my interest in several BP tankers which Image Delivery will search for & provide me with details & prints, if required.
The waterfront is nothing like I remembered it although other parts are - Arwenack St., for example, is little changed, apart from the names above the shops.
Thanks once again for those details - very interesting.
Kind regards,
John.

Paddy Power
6th October 2011, 14:12
Does anyone remember about a murder happening on board British Queen sometime around 1965 - 1966
Mike

david freeman
11th October 2011, 09:31
Does anyone remember about a murder happening on board British Queen sometime around 1965 - 1966
Mike

I do not rember this? It is round about my time on the vessel. You are ringing bells! I am trying to recall a shore side incident in the gulf, the crew member returned from a p--s up ashore fell(Sad) of the gangplank ( No netting in those days and fell in the hoggin-feared drowned). But I do not think this was the Queen???

Puffin's skipper
15th November 2011, 17:35
I seem to remember a "rumour" going around the Mena el Ahmedi terminal canteen in Iraq that someone had recently 'gone over the wall' on the Britsh Queen and the word in the mess was that that he didnt either jump or fall.. I was on the British Venture at the time I think so that would around the mid-sixties.
By the way if everyone I met in a BP tanker mess who SAID they were one of the AB's who changed the name of the British Workman to 'Workhouse' or was serving on her at the time then it had a deck crowd of about 300 and at least 50 of them were sitting on a two man paint stage over her bows actually painting her name..
Good Story though.. and possible . I once 'renamed' the Shell tanker "Aramaic" myself into a well known chocolate bar by painting out the "i" on the stern a week before we paid off her.. She still had 'Aramac' on her bum a month later in Rotterdam so a shipmate told me who, (unlike me) was was "asked back" after that trip.

davet
17th November 2011, 18:10
About 1966 there was a murder on the British Bombardier'. I think 2 or 3 crew were charged and tried. I think that they were found Not Guilty. The victim was the Second Steward.

twogrumpy
17th November 2011, 20:13
About 1966 there was a murder on the British Bombardier'. I think 2 or 3 crew were charged and tried. I think that they were found Not Guilty. The victim was the Second Steward.
That could well be the one where the judge said that he was shocked
that drink was available 24 hours a day on the ship.
Miserable git!!
(Cloud)

missmarie
10th December 2011, 05:17
I found this satellite view of the RMS Queen Mary: http://www.satelliteview.org/satellite/RMS_Queen_Mary

R58484956
10th December 2011, 17:02
Greetings MM and welcome to SN, this particular thread is related to BP shipping
and not Cunard.

Puffin's skipper
12th December 2011, 02:53
Greetings MM and welcome to SN, this particular thread is related to BP shipping
and not Cunard.

Why not?
I was on deck on British tankers and on outward bound tank cleaning duty we were all working "fer' Cunard" (*))

davidtoyne
14th May 2012, 21:37
I was on the British Queen for most of 1962, too. Just a saloon steward I'm afraid - went on to greater things! Just wondered if you remembered me - I probably remember you as I got on well with all the crew and the old man gave me a commendation to BP!
I wouldn't mind a larger copy of the trials pic if you can get in touch!

Great picture of her on her trials off the Isle of Arran.
She was built by John Brown on the Clyde & launched by Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother in 1959. At the time, she was the largest tanker in the world, I believe.
I served on her in 1962 & she was my last ship as an (senior) apprentice.
I think she suffered a fire at sea sometime late in her life & the engineers' accommodation aft was gutted.
On one occasion coming through the Canal, she stopped at Port Said for a hull paint job. When it came to re-painting her name, the letter 'N' was replaced with an 'R'.....
Marine Superintendant at discharge port not best pleased.......
Finally scrapped in 1975 at Kaohsiung.

KEN WILLIAMS
21st May 2012, 10:11
HI im looking for NORMAN MERCER. he was my shift eng at the wouldam cement works in GRAYS HE SHOWED me a picture of the crew of the b.p queen when the queen came on board. I think norman was 2eng.ITmust have been pre 60 or late50.can any one help me KEN WILLIAMS IN NEW ZEALAND