SS Pacific Envoy Furness Withy

PJG1412
18th April 2008, 17:54
I sailed on this ship '61/63 as Engs.steward. I had the A4 plans for 40 years and eventually made my first scratch build last year. Not museum standard.
We carried general cargo (include whiskey) from UK to West coast of US and Canada. One trip was during Cuban crisis when we were 'bussed' by US ships and planes, carrying whiskey to the Americans helped I think. On the return voyage we lost the f'ward wood cargo in a hurricane.

Jim MacIntyre
19th April 2008, 02:35
Hi PJ
Was that the same hull you had the pics of in KShips thread??
She looks great.. I was a couple of years before you on that run on the Pacific Fortune. Recall same circumstances in the Caribs - lost most of the lumber deck cargo in a hurricane.
Where did yo come by the plans - after seeing your pics I may well start a model of the Fortune in the future, they were similar enough.
Jim Mac

PJG1412
29th April 2008, 15:41
Hi Jim Mac
The hull is the same one. The plans were in Model Boats June 1966, the ship was the Stronghold which I believe was the sister ship to the Envoy. The superstructure of the Fortune is slightly different from the Envoy, but the hull shape looks the same. There were 6 ships on this 3 month run, Reliance, Unity and Northwest.
PJ
PS: I don't know if copying would infringe an copyright ?

Jim MacIntyre
29th April 2008, 17:01
PJ
The names of the ships were to spell out FURNESS - Fortune, Unity, Reliance, Northwest, Envoy, Stronghold. They never did come up with the second S.
It was a fantastic run - as you say mostly whisky but I also recall fancy sports cars, and for some reason cases of Robertsons jam come to mind.. all sort of stuff. On the return apart from lumber we had oranges and apples.
It was lot of work marking off the different lots for various discharge ports.
Re plans - copyright issue - I'll get in touch with Model Boats and see if they still have it in their archives (Stronghold) As to superstructure - I have a GA plan of the Reliance and I have some photos of the Fortune for comparison.
I'll let you know how it goes.
Cheers
Jim Mac

Jim MacIntyre
30th April 2008, 16:03
PJ
Found a copy of Model Boats June 1966 issue for sale in e-Bay. Seller confirmed 2.5 page article on the 'Stronghold' including line drawings.
We might be discussing scale and power options in a couple of weeks.
Cheers
Jim Mac

prm2mekingston
30th April 2008, 16:49
I sailed as an Apprentice on the "Pacific Ranger" (Liberty ship ex "Samdaring") in 1951/2 on the Los Angeles/Middle East pipe run, and the "Pacific Nomad" (Liberty ship ex "Samavon") in 1953-54 on the UK/West coast N. America run. We carried general cargo in open stowage topped off with whisky and sports cars (250,000 cases of whisky in open stowage is hard to control!) and brought lumber, mostly railrod ties, back to the UK. We routinely lost partial deck-loads of lumber in the North Atlantic as railroad ties were too short to bind together properly.
Captain Patrick R.M.Toomey, Canadian Coast Guard, (retired).

Jim MacIntyre
30th April 2008, 19:49
Hello Patrick.
As I recall the worst part when it came to 'control' were the dockies in Glasgow loading the whisky. If they couldn't talk you into opening a case and giving them a bottle or two they would 'bounce' the incoming pallets until something broke and they got their grog.. then there was always one that was too drunk to climb out of the hatch at the end of the shift...
Lumber on deck - when you see turnbuckles the size of your forearm snapped and bent you definitely appreciate the forces of Mother Nature....
Cheers
Jim Mac

saltyswamp
30th April 2008, 22:05
I sailed on this ship '61/63 as Engs.steward. I had the A4 plans for 40 years and eventually made my first scratch build last year. Not museum standard.
We carried general cargo (include whiskey) from UK to West coast of US and Canada. One trip was during Cuban crisis when we were 'bussed' by US ships and planes, carrying whiskey to the Americans helped I think. On the return voyage we lost the f'ward wood cargo in a hurricane.

HI Looks good to me wish i had the time to build one myself

stuart

Trevorw
1st May 2008, 16:09
Sailed on the "Northwest" in 56/57. Brilliant ship and a brilliant run. The Captain was called Perry, an absolute gentleman. I was the R/O, but he never called me Sparks - always "Marco"!
You are to be complimented on your model - it's almost a dead ringer for the photo of the "Northwest" I have on my study wall!

michael charters
5th April 2010, 00:01
i sailed on pacific envoy when it was Rms loch ryan. The runs to Frisco were the greatest.we carried 12 passengers. Perry was captian Butler was Chief engineer.
I think the store keeper received OBE for services to MN. Whisky Galore Boats!

michael charters
5th April 2010, 00:04
have built model SD14, similar to furness ships

TOM ALEXANDER
9th April 2010, 08:05
I sailed as deck apprentice on the Pacific Northwest from 56 - 58. Good ship, good run - met my wife of 50 years in Nanaimo loading pulp at the Harmac Pulp Mill. We nearly lost a load of deck cargo off the Washington State coast - sure made a mess of the port fo'cstle ladder when it shifted. Out of Glasgow usually loaded about 120,000 cases of liquor, mostly Scotch. Also cars, Morris Minors, etc., with the odd Rolls Royce and Aston Martin thrown in for good measure. Everything else from bags of nails, to steel plate, to ladies powder compacts. On the return from Vancouver, B.C., grain, apples, wood pulp, newsprint, lumber, and then further south citrus fruit, dried fruit from Stockton, California, and cotton waste. First mate's name was Cole, believe he went into Thames pilotage when he left the ship. Worst job? -- Taking the deep tank fuel oil soundings with mercator gauges, pumping up pressure jammed between the Yarrows boilers and the bulkhead when going through the Panama Canal. (Maybe not - perhaps working a whirly hammer chipping the decks which suffered from sea water under the deck cargoes.

TOM ALEXANDER
9th April 2010, 17:25
Must be getting old - was already blonde. After sleeping on it, I recalled the first mate's name was not Cole, but Stanley Coe.

chris giles
26th April 2010, 23:34
Hi, I was 4th mate on the Northwest in about 62 or 3 did 4 trips in her. Captain was Simms. Real gentleman. Whiskey, cars, lumber, apples, citrus and plenty more. Trip after trip. Was an apprentice in the Envoy about 59/60. Can you remember a Dave Greenwood on the Reliance? Rgds Chris Giles

CAPT.BOB
28th July 2010, 21:14
After a time away from ShipsNostalgia It's good to return and find some Furness Chat.
I too enjoyed the West Coast Run and spent a number of happy trips there,latterly on the Fortune as 4th Mate with Capt Simonds,Duggie Aitchison Mate,Roger Hann 2/o and Brian Dyson 3/0.

michael charters
28th July 2010, 23:27
Did you know James Downie Chief Electrician? Capt Bob?

Tavistock
20th December 2011, 10:25
Yes, I knew Jimmy Downie well. I completed my Engineering Apprenticeship with Furness with 2 voyages on the Envoy in 1962 and often worked with him on daywork. He was a very interesting character with a wealth of experience.
Cannot remember the name of the Chief Engineer at the time but he was Lt Commander RNR and being an apprentice I was not meant to forget it . Henry Topping was the 2nd Eng. and Wilf. Dickinson Jnr 2nd.
After The Envoy I sailed on the Pacific Reliance for 18 months as Junior and 4th Engineer before sitting my 2nd Class Steam Cert.
John Greaves, Ch Eng. Gordon Taylor, 2nd Eng and Olly Mark Jnr 2nd.

Jim S
20th December 2011, 19:37
I sailed on Pacific Unity as J/E late1961-mid 1962.
Frank Geraghty was Chief, Gordon Taylor Senr 2nd and John Sealey (spelling?)
was Jnr 2nd. The other two J/E were Bob Sanderson and John Roberts.
Bob had been on Queen of Bermuda, John Roberts on Nova Scotia - I was a first trip J/E. I found Gordon Taylor to be a great guy - a genial Geordie
I made contact with Bob Sanderson fairly recently he retired as a Senior Chief Engineer with P&O Ferries.

TOM ALEXANDER
21st December 2011, 07:31
I sailed on this ship '61/63 as Engs.steward. I had the A4 plans for 40 years and eventually made my first scratch build last year. Not museum standard.
We carried general cargo (include whiskey) from UK to West coast of US and Canada. One trip was during Cuban crisis when we were 'bussed' by US ships and planes, carrying whiskey to the Americans helped I think. On the return voyage we lost the f'ward wood cargo in a hurricane.

Pacific Northwest 56 - 58. Didn't get "buzzed" but came close to loosing a deck cargo of lumber off Cape Flattery in some really "snotty" conditions. Shifting cargo made a right mess of the port side fo'cstle ladder.

TOM ALEXANDER
21st December 2011, 07:36
Hello Patrick.
As I recall the worst part when it came to 'control' were the dockies in Glasgow loading the whisky. If they couldn't talk you into opening a case and giving them a bottle or two they would 'bounce' the incoming pallets until something broke and they got their grog.. then there was always one that was too drunk to climb out of the hatch at the end of the shift...
Lumber on deck - when you see turnbuckles the size of your forearm snapped and bent you definitely appreciate the forces of Mother Nature....
Cheers
Jim Mac

They'd only bounce the pallets with the wooden cases --- when they strained the whisky into their tea cans it didn't taste -- the cardboard cartons made the contents taste of cardboard. They reserved those to cut a three sided lid on the case (mickeys) so they could help themselves whenever.

PJG1412
24th December 2011, 22:55
I remember being berthed at New Westminster one afternoon , and seeing 6 to 8 deck crew walking down the gangway each carrying a case of Whisky on their shouders and walk across to the Northwest (I think) It may have been a Sunday as the dockside was completely empty, so there was nobody to stop them, it was so brazon.
As for the lumber being lost, I took some photos from the monkey island during the storm I will try to find them.

Pete

PJG1412
25th December 2011, 08:02
PJ
Found a copy of Model Boats June 1966 issue for sale in e-Bay. Seller confirmed 2.5 page article on the 'Stronghold' including line drawings.
We might be discussing scale and power options in a couple of weeks.
Cheers
Jim Mac

Jim Mac
Did you make any headway with this? My Pacific Envoy is gathering dust these days as another project starts.
Pete

michael charters
24th January 2012, 19:24
Yes, I knew Jimmy Downie well. I completed my Engineering Apprenticeship with Furness with 2 voyages on the Envoy in 1962 and often worked with him on daywork. He was a very interesting character with a wealth of experience.
Cannot remember the name of the Chief Engineer at the time but he was Lt Commander RNR and being an apprentice I was not meant to forget it . Henry Topping was the 2nd Eng. and Wilf. Dickinson Jnr 2nd.
After The Envoy I sailed on the Pacific Reliance for 18 months as Junior and 4th Engineer before sitting my 2nd Class Steam Cert.
John Greaves, Ch Eng. Gordon Taylor, 2nd Eng and Olly Mark Jnr 2nd.

sailed on Envoy abd reliance/ Envoy was the cleaner vessel

cboots
24th January 2012, 23:28
I did a couple of voyages on the Envoy as a deck apprentice in the mid-sixties. She was indeed a fine ship though not a particularly happy one as I recall. It was a great run indeed although as a deck apprentice with all that whisky in the cargo, and 24 hour dock working in just about every port, one was extremely lucky to see much outside of a cargo hold for most of the coastal passage.
CBoots

liverbob
25th January 2012, 03:07
sailed 0n the pacific liberty.galley boy,52-53.ex liberty ship.
samcalia.ran aground entrance to coos bay.up to the usual
ports vancouver,seatle and such.on the way back to the uk
spent three weeks in cristobel us navy docks getting repairs
after running aground coos bay ,
liverbob

michael charters
25th January 2012, 18:47
sailed 0n the pacific liberty.galley boy,52-53.ex liberty ship.
samcalia.ran aground entrance to coos bay.up to the usual
ports vancouver,seatle and such.on the way back to the uk
spent three weeks in cristobel us navy docks getting repairs
after running aground coos bay ,
liverbob

coos bay did some runs there and a place called WOOD FIBRE???

michael charters
25th January 2012, 18:52
I sailed on this ship '61/63 as Engs.steward. I had the A4 plans for 40 years and eventually made my first scratch build last year. Not museum standard.
We carried general cargo (include whiskey) from UK to West coast of US and Canada. One trip was during Cuban crisis when we were 'bussed' by US ships and planes, carrying whiskey to the Americans helped I think. On the return voyage we lost the f'ward wood cargo in a hurricane.

love your model of Pacific Envoy. Was Leckie on her. have built SD14 cargo ships myself. Good details. loved that ship and the runs to USA
Do remember carrying Horses outward bound

michael charters
25th January 2012, 18:59
Sailed on the "Northwest" in 56/57. Brilliant ship and a brilliant run. The Captain was called Perry, an absolute gentleman. I was the R/O, but he never called me Sparks - always "Marco"!
You are to be complimented on your model - it's almost a dead ringer for the photo of the "Northwest" I have on my study wall!

capt perry thr phoney yank? :we need to pump some nerve gas into the engine room was one of his quotes

harold everitt
9th April 2013, 17:29
i sailed on the northwest in 1957 for a year and a half and then went onto the envoy when it was brand new. loved the northwest though.

TOM ALEXANDER
10th April 2013, 08:38
Sailed on the "Northwest" in 56/57. Brilliant ship and a brilliant run. The Captain was called Perry, an absolute gentleman. I was the R/O, but he never called me Sparks - always "Marco"!
You are to be complimented on your model - it's almost a dead ringer for the photo of the "Northwest" I have on my study wall!

I was a deck aprentice on the Northwest then so we must have sailed together. I remember Capt. Perry -- was on his last trip just before he retired. Can't remember the name of the next Captain, but the mate was Stanley Coe. Bo'sun an old Islay man by the name of MacDonald.

TOM ALEXANDER
10th April 2013, 08:42
coos bay did some runs there and a place called WOOD FIBRE???

Wood Fibre closed down years ago - called there on the Northwest and got stuck up the mountain behind the mill all night with two other apprentices. They were just organizing a search party for us when we got back first thing in the morning. Just two weeks ago though, took two of my great grandsons around the Brittania Beach mine just across Howe Sound from Wood Fibre and regaled them with the tale.

harold everitt
10th April 2013, 12:49
i was a refrigerator engineer and that was the best boat i sailed on

TOM ALEXANDER
11th April 2013, 06:48
i was a refrigerator engineer and that was the best boat i sailed on

Seem to remember going down around the fridge gear in the deck houses to get to the dunnage boards in the upper and lower 'tween decks. Good place to "skive" off -- nobody ever thought of looking for us there. (Gleam)

harold everitt
5th May 2013, 08:51
would you remember my dad harold everitt he sailed the northwest in 1957 as 2nd fridge engineer

Cornish Wrecker
2nd August 2013, 20:31
Sailed on Pacific Reliance for three trips out to Vancouver. Was chased out of hold in Glasgow when trying to stop dockers breaking open cases of whicky. Was threatened with one of those hand held cargo hooks deceided that was the time to leave them to it and withdraw.
The Mate used to work us hard so got a transfer to the Queen of Bermuda,on arriving on board bumped into the same Mate who had been moved there as well.!!!

TOM ALEXANDER
3rd August 2013, 07:27
would you remember my dad harold everitt he sailed the northwest in 1957 as 2nd fridge engineer

Don't remember him by name, but I was on the Pacific No Rest for 2 years so I'm sure we worked together at some point. Seem to remember him as a gentle, laid back type of guy.