Camito in dry dock 1959

A.J.McMahon
25th April 2008, 18:08
How many of you guys out there remember this ship?

A J McMahon

David E
26th April 2008, 13:00
How many of you guys out there remember this ship?

A J McMahon

Remember her well. Alongside her in Kingston on her maiden voyage. Never sailed in her.With Fyffes from 1953-1957.
Zent (3M),Golfito(3M),Cavina(3M/2M)
Reventazon(3M),Tortuguero(3M),Manistee(3M/2M),
Ariguani(3M),Matina(2M).Moved on to VLCCs after that.

Regards
David E

A.J.McMahon
27th April 2008, 11:42
Remember her well. Alongside her in Kingston on her maiden voyage. Never sailed in her.With Fyffes from 1953-1957.
Zent (3M),Golfito(3M),Cavina(3M/2M)
Reventazon(3M),Tortuguero(3M),Manistee(3M/2M),
Ariguani(3M),Matina(2M).Moved on to VLCCs after that.

Regards
David E

Hi! David,
I think the Camito was about the best feeder I was on although B.C.L. came a very close 2nd.I tried to update the profile and thread yesterday made a mess will try today. I am better with a hammer than a keyboard!
Regards A.J.McMahon

pillhobbler
27th April 2008, 13:03
Hi
My Grandfather was on the first Camito when torpedoed in the Atlantic in 1943.
Then my uncle was on the seconed Camito in may 1961 which sailed from Avonmouth to the West Indies according to his discharge book.
Next time I speak to him i will ask him if he can recall this trip.
Regards Oli...

A.J.McMahon
27th April 2008, 20:39
Additonal pictures,It is easier working a double watch in heavy weather than geting my head around this wonderful new world of I.T.

roy quirk
13th May 2008, 21:43
Hi Tony,
Thanks for your advice on how to send attachments! I've added my engine room photos to my thread and this one here of us in a lifeboat ( A lever operated boat so there was no engine to check over!!!) The only other bloke I remember,was the 2nd Eng.,who got paid off for bedding a female passenger,and the Captain found out.(who had his eye on her himself,it was rumoured) I have stronger memories from when I was 2nd Eng.myself on the Chicanoa,perhaps because the Camito was an easy,no problem,engine room. I've also added the farewell dinner menu for your perusal.
Cheers,
Roy

ian d.cameron
13th May 2008, 22:06
Hi
My Grandfather was on the first Camito when torpedoed in the Atlantic in 1943.
Then my uncle was on the seconed Camito in may 1961 which sailed from Avonmouth to the West Indies according to his discharge book.
Next time I speak to him i will ask him if he can recall this trip.
Regards Oli...

Don't know if you have this pillhobbler, but here it is anyway
http://www.uboat.net/allies/merchants/906.html

pillhobbler
25th May 2008, 15:15
Thanks Ian
This is how I found out about the sinking of the CAMITO.

terence
25th May 2008, 22:32
nice photos roy
cheers terry music man ex fyffes

harryc1939
20th June 2008, 20:43
Additonal pictures,It is easier working a double watch in heavy weather than geting my head around this wonderful new world of I.T.

Recognise Dusty Millar on engine manouvering platform in vest.

Harry Campbell

A.J.McMahon
23rd June 2008, 12:07
Recognise Dusty Millar on engine manouvering platform in vest.

Harry Campbell

That is correct Harry! Dusty was a great shark fisherman he caught a number of 5-7 foot on various trips when we were loading at Port Antonio. I guess it was his Aussie background, he was an asset to the engineroom, I sailed with him for 2yrs on the Camito, of e/fyffes, good days and great feeder!!

r m lawrie
23rd June 2008, 17:02
I remember Dusty Miller,he was the first guy I ever met in Fyffes.He was leaning over the handrails looking out for the soon to be promoted Supt
Griffiths who was sailing to see a Steam plant.He mistook me as the Supt lifted my bags to the Engineers accomodation and the C/E Jock Burns,when
he heard who I was he dropped my bags.He was a real character

Tony money
23rd June 2008, 20:39
I remember Dusty Miller from when I was 2nd/Elect on the Camito 1962/3.
C/Eng Jock Burns, C/Elect Bob Isbister and the old man Captian Lundy.

A.J.McMahon
24th June 2008, 18:29
Tony was Bob Isbister on for a relief trip ? I sailed with him when Eric Taylor was having a trip off, I think that was only on two occasions. What other people do you recall from that time, I know the 1st Officer, had just been given command, that is Captain P A Chubb, because I sailed with him on my last voyage with Fyffes on the Reventazon, that was late '62 Best regards AJM.

Scottseng
25th June 2008, 23:54
Remember Dusty well, as you had to keep your on the spare trip wires or they finished up traces for his shark lines.

Tony money
26th June 2008, 19:45
Hi AJ, Bob had done at least one trip when I joined in S/pton late Aug 62, We sailed about 4 Sept. I did 6 trips before joining the Leith Hill in May 63 for just on two years.
I'm not too good with names but I think Sam Gready relieved Jock Burns, I remember the 2/Eng trapped his fingers in the fiddly door one trip what a mess. Ragards Tony

David E
26th June 2008, 21:17
I remember Dusty Miller from when I was 2nd/Elect on the Camito 1962/3.
C/Eng Jock Burns, C/Elect Bob Isbister and the old man Captian Lundy.

Bob Isbister went back a long way.I remember him in the Golfito when I was
3M there in 1954.
I don't know if Robert Walter Lundy OBE.RD.RNR had mellowed by the time he I arrived in the Camito,I served a sentence with him as 3M in the Ariguani in 1956 and I was very glad to transfer out of the ship.

Regards
David E

Tony money
26th June 2008, 21:25
Cpt Lundy mellowed no chance, he band me off decks after sunset one trip.

A.J.McMahon
27th June 2008, 17:08
That's very interesting Tony.Do you wish to give a full confession now ? I will absolve you for 6 bottles of Bass,2G&T's and a couple of ginger beers.It is interesting seeing different peoples perception of Capt.L. To get it from my perspective, I was deferred until I finished my apprentiship, then as the call up papers were coming I looked at R.E.M.E. and the R.N. engineering branches-----seeing that I was the best thing since sliced bread to come out of the trade!----Man ! What a revelation I got,when I entered the real world! However to go into the Grey Funnel fleet or REME. would entail signing up for what apparently was a lifetime. I decided being a coward that 5 years in the "Merch" was not a bad idea, if I did not like it I could pack it in and do my national service. Well can you imagine getting on the West Indies run aboard the Camito at 21 years of age.I would have saluted and painted everything in site ! The food was great and they payed a lot more than the conscripts were getting! the birds and the flying fish were truly magnificent. I think that Capt. L. did run the ship like the R.N.--probably better. As David E will recall there was a great deal of oil and water separation in those days, which was not ideal for running the best of operations,it took untill I went on the North Atlantic trade (especially in winter) to find truly intergrated deck and engine crews. Having said all that ,I do think the said Capt. had mellowed over the period that I was there,he invited me to one of his cocktail parties after I had just thrashed him at deck tennis, can't be bad! Incidently did you relieve Fred Hartry on the Box Hill,great mate of mine we served our time at the same works,Shirley Bassey was on the Production line there. Regards AJMc.

Tony money
27th June 2008, 20:51
Hi AJ. Very good offer ,but lady in question is probably a very respectable grandmother. I remember Bob saying if you spend your nights on B deck take a torch and keep a light on, that way you won't get caught out if there's a
blackout. Tony

Jim S
27th June 2008, 22:04
Hi AJ. Very good offer ,but lady in question is probably a very respectable grandmother. I remember Bob saying if you spend your nights on B deck take a torch and keep a light on, that way you won't get caught out if there's a
blackout. Tony

Very sound advice from Bob Isbister _ I will say no more

Camito - 1968-1972

Ron Stringer
28th June 2008, 10:55
As David E will recall there was a great deal of oil and water separation in those days,

Was E&F especially bad for this? It was certainly true of the 'Golfito' when I was on her in 1960/61. Being one of the R/Os, we were in no man's land; sometimes the 'agony aunt', hearing confidences from either of the departments about the infamies committed by the other department but at other times we were the outcasts, accused of being in cahoots with either or both departments.

After I left the ship I never came across the problem to anything like the same degree in other companies.

A.J.McMahon
28th June 2008, 15:23
Very sound advice from Bob Isbister _ I will say no more

Camito - 1968-1972
Wise old sage was Bob Isbister, but not quite as euphemistic as you may have thought. As 2nd Elec he was insuring with your flashlight you would be down there and "have it sorted",in the event of a blackout Ha Ha.AJM.

A.J.McMahon
28th June 2008, 16:21
Was E&F especially bad for this? It was certainly true of the 'Golfito' when I was on her in 1960/61. Being one of the R/Os, we were in no man's land; sometimes the 'agony aunt', hearing confidences from either of the departments about the infamies committed by the other department but at other times we were the outcasts, accused of being in cahoots with either or both departments.

After I left the ship I never came across the problem to anything like the same degree in other companies.Hi Ron,I don't believe E/F were any worse for this arcane practice than any other mail/passenger ship. However once conscription finished the division got less a kind of gradual emulsification. I guess it will be perpetual by the thoughtless, it comes in a different guise.---You will not encounter quite the same as you witnessed, but unfortunately bigotry,anti-Semitism and a thousand other variations are still with us today.-----Not just shipping companies. As you know there are some great of all walks colour religion and there is the odd Evil B. --- Man it's getting heavy!! Have a nice day AJM.

DURANGO
28th June 2008, 17:38
Hi Ron,I don't believe E/F were any worse for this arcane practice than any other mail/passenger ship. However once conscription finished the division got less a kind of gradual emulsification. I guess it will be perpetual by the thoughtless, it comes in a different guise.---You will not encounter quite the same as you witnessed, but unfortunately bigotry,anti-Semitism and a thousand other variations are still with us today.-----Not just shipping companies. As you know there are some great of all walks colour religion and there is the odd Evil B. --- Man it's getting heavy!! Have a nice day AJM.
I remember being in kingston with her i was in one of royal mail line ships at the time , i heard a rumour that the bosun and an a.b. where lost over the side in heavy weather lashing down a horse box on one of the company ships , it might just be a a load of bull , if there was any truth in it im sure a company man would have heard about it and would be able to confirm any truth in it .

Jim S
28th June 2008, 18:45
I remember being in kingston with her i was in one of royal mail line ships at the time , i heard a rumour that the bosun and an a.b. where lost over the side in heavy weather lashing down a horse box on one of the company ships , it might just be a a load of bull , if there was any truth in it im sure a company man would have heard about it and would be able to confirm any truth in it .

Unfortunately the story is true - See posting Under Chuscal by Dave Beaumont
The incident was on Chuscal in April 1966 and 5 were lost. Bosun, AB, Seaman, and two Deck Apprentices

A.J.McMahon
28th June 2008, 18:48
Hi Durango, Unfortunately it is true. I had left Fyffes at the time, the Chuscal was on route to Avonmouth, which was my home port, with Bristol City Lines.If you check out the Chuscal thread, it still puts a shiver down me. Good sailing AJM.

A.J.McMahon
28th June 2008, 19:01
Sorry Jim, I did not see your post untill I hit the button!!Best regards AJM.

David E
28th June 2008, 21:13
Hi Ron,I don't believe E/F were any worse for this arcane practice than any other mail/passenger ship. However once conscription finished the division got less a kind of gradual emulsification. I guess it will be perpetual by the thoughtless, it comes in a different guise.---You will not encounter quite the same as you witnessed, but unfortunately bigotry,anti-Semitism and a thousand other variations are still with us today.-----Not just shipping companies. As you know there are some great of all walks colour religion and there is the odd Evil B. --- Man it's getting heavy!! Have a nice day AJM.

Oddly enough,the separation that existed in Fyffes,was less marked in the Golfito when I was there in '54,than it was in the other ships in the fleet.I think this was due to the fact that there was a common officers mess where all the J/Os fed and a lounge on the after end of the boat deck accomodation that we all used.With the tight control on bar sales that existed then, we all chipped in to the Vat 19 run in Port of Spain,then in the evenings, met and drank the noble spirit in the after accomodation.There was a history of "common cause" in Fyffes when the need arose. A particularly devious and unpleasant Master was removed from the old "Matina" when the Junior Mates and most of the Engineers refused to sign on while he remained in the ship.With bananas agrowing and passengers awaitng Fyffes had no option but to shift him.Sufficient to say,none of the rebels survived very long in the fleet.

Thinking back over the years I don't think it was a deliberate or concious separation in the ships I sailed in,it existed-simply the way that the ships were designed.In the nature of things you had greater contact with the group you lived with.Going back to my time in Bank Line,in the Inchanga,for example,as Apprentices,we were integrated with the Engineers because we lived in the same accomodation,as Mates,we wern't,because we lived apart.
In the older tankers,even with general messing,a degree of separation existed with the navigators living in the centre of the ship and the engineers aft.I think two events broke down the barriers-the new training system that introduced Engineer Cadets and integrated accomodation.

Nice bit of nostalgia.A long "write" for me.

Regards
David E

A.J.McMahon
29th June 2008, 21:03
Hi David,very interesting your recollection of yesteryear you took the clock back further. I agree with much of what you said, however as an elect on day work covering all parts, tank top to top mast I did see the odd "Old colonial Pukka-Sahib" at large. I guess the more you compartmentalize the easier it is to bring in the mushroom farm effect. They may have known what array of silver service to use, but in many aspects they were out of their depth, compounded by an overbearing/ condescending attitude. Bit like New Labour!!Except for new labour delete silver service insert Pot Noodle. Can you recall who was on the Manistee when you were there. I was st/by on the Manistee in Avonmouth Nov.58, there were three E/F ships in at the time, one was about to be scrapped. Ken Peach ,Sampson, Alan Skidmore and the chief fridge of the Manistee we would partake of the occasional tipple in the George, Regards AJM.

David E
30th June 2008, 00:17
Hi David,very interesting your recollection of yesteryear you took the clock back further. I agree with much of what you said, however as an elect on day work covering all parts, tank top to top mast I did see the odd "Old colonial Pukka-Sahib" at large. I guess the more you compartmentalize the easier it is to bring in the mushroom farm effect. They may have known what array of silver service to use, but in many aspects they were out of their depth, compounded by an overbearing/ condescending attitude. Bit like New Labour!!Except for new labour delete silver service insert Pot Noodle. Can you recall who was on the Manistee when you were there. I was st/by on the Manistee in Avonmouth Nov.58, there were three E/F ships in at the time, one was about to be scrapped. Ken Peach ,Sampson, Alan Skidmore and the chief fridge of the Manistee we would partake of the occasional tipple in the George, Regards AJM.

Sorry,I can't-it's too far back.I can barely remember the deck crowd then.I did two spells in the Manistee-one as 3M in 1955 when the OM was Barber:1M was John Beatson:2M was Ken Leslie.The second through most of 1957, as 2M:two OMs Barber,then Bill Young, I can't remember the 1Ms name and the 3M was a young Dutchman who had married an English girl and swopped to British ships. Ken Peach rings a bell-was he 2E in the Cavina ?

Regards
David E

A.J.McMahon
6th March 2009, 20:01
Hi Tony,
Thanks for your advice on how to send attachments! I've added my engine room photos to my thread and this one here of us in a lifeboat ( A lever operated boat so there was no engine to check over!!!) The only other bloke I remember,was the 2nd Eng.,who got paid off for bedding a female passenger,and the Captain found out.(who had his eye on her himself,it was rumoured) I have stronger memories from when I was 2nd Eng.myself on the Chicanoa,perhaps because the Camito was an easy,no problem,engine room. I've also added the farewell dinner menu for your perusal.
Cheers,
Roy
HI Roy, Whilst agreeing with you in part, as to the Camito being an easy ship to run,what dates were you there? We had two fires aboard, the one was quite serious. Another time we had the Tubo-gen set, overspeed, and put some blades through the condenser, it very nearly happened again some months later, after the first event, it was apparent the govenor was sticking. I was top side for the first event, but I heard the bang. The next time I was attempting to "Off Load", one of the pair of turbo- sets that were running in parallel. It was observed that all was not right, so we throttled back the steam, on the one we needed off and tripped the breaker at the desired point. Thanks for the menu, when I showed it to my other half she said No Way. Regards AJM.

Cutsplice
6th March 2009, 21:15
I recall an incident on the Comito, (I was not there) where a fireman was forcibly dumped over the side. I beleive an AB was tried for murder and found guilty.

kenhill999
26th November 2009, 12:22
How many of you guys out there remember this ship?

A J McMahon

Ken hill R397722
I am new to nostalgia, I was storkeeper on maiden voyage from Greenock 9th November 1956. after workup ship in Glasgow.Master Cpt Bull ,eight trips till september 1957.My first trip on fyffes Bayano June 1952,more later.
Ken.

Jim S
26th November 2009, 20:40
I recall an incident on the Comito, (I was not there) where a fireman was forcibly dumped over the side. I beleive an AB was tried for murder and found guilty.

You are quite correct in your recall - As I remember from the newspapers of the day. The unfortunate fireman was going aft along C-Deck working alleyway to call the fireman and greaser of the next watch when he saw two ABs (I think there were two but may be mistaken) throwing the Bosun's personal belongings through his cabin port. On remonstrating with the pair the fireman was assaulted and dragged to the open deck area at the stern of the ship and thrown overboard to his death. I think it was at night possibly around midnight when there would have been few others about. During the day C-Deck Starboard side was a busy place.
Many years later while serving on Camito I always thought of the unfortunate victim when visiting that part of the ship.

Jim S

A.J.McMahon
27th November 2009, 19:38
You are quite correct in your recall - As I remember from the newspapers of the day. The unfortunate fireman was going aft along C-Deck working alleyway to call the fireman and greaser of the next watch when he saw two ABs (I think there were two but may be mistaken) throwing the Bosun's personal belongings through his cabin port. On remonstrating with the pair the fireman was assaulted and dragged to the open deck area at the stern of the ship and thrown overboard to his death. I think it was at night possibly around midnight when there would have been few others about. During the day C-Deck Starboard side was a busy place.
Many years later while serving on Camito I always thought of the unfortunate victim when visiting that part of the ship.

Jim S

I had left the Camito by the time of this terrible crime. The firemans name was Joe G.(I do not consider it appropriate for full name) He was one of the most reliable men onboard, never missed his watch and always on time, that is more than can be said for a few around the Jamaican coast !! It was a regular occurrance to have the stragglers poured back aboard at final port of call, most often Port Antonio or Montego Bay. This problem seemed to increase when Consription finished, at least for a few years, think I saw more D.R.s handed out to people on those ships, than in any other period during my 15yrs at sea. It is hardly surprising that it has now gone the other way, dry ship, I was no angel but was there, on time and doing what I was paid for, it was a good rate compared to boot camp.I know of this event from a long time friend who was still aboard as J.eng at the time

kenhill999
2nd December 2009, 09:42
Hi A.J.McMahon and ship mates,can anyone tell me the demise of barman Bill Fleming,he passed over the barr off Trinadad or Barbados after I left September 57. Five years from maiden trip as storekeeper.As for Capt Lundy I was Capt steward for many trips on the Bayano from 1953.
Regards Kenhill999.

sailingday
2nd December 2009, 14:24
I did 2 trips on the Camito June -sept 1958, I remember Captain Lundy he played Lonnie Donnegan music over the tannoid nearly all day. Remember the chppy shark fishing in Montego Bay, he caught a whopper. Also in Bowden we had to walk to a bar, all going well till a car overtook us and caught in it's headlights were hundreds of land crabs, we walked a bit faster after that, no worries on the return journey, well fortified with rum

A.J.McMahon
18th January 2010, 12:27
Hi A.J.McMahon and ship mates,can anyone tell me the demise of barman Bill Fleming,he passed over the barr off Trinadad or Barbados after I left September 57. Five years from maiden trip as storekeeper.As for Capt Lundy I was Capt steward for many trips on the Bayano from 1953.
Regards Kenhill999.

Hi Ken, I remember Bill Fleming, I would work any repairs to bar or galley through the night, so as to minimize the disruption to the service on offer. It also gave me a clear run at the job, without people falling over my legs, whilst laying on my back with my head in the oven/ fridge. Always had a good working relationship with the catering crowd. I am not sure if it was Bill or the chef that we buried at sea. It certainly happened on one of the voyages between 1959/60. I recall the evening of the burial service, which on the schedule was a dance night. I decided that I would give the dance a miss only to be sent a cryptic message by the Old Man, to get myself down and get dancing!! Some times people would be around the room like wallflowers, at these times either he or I would start the action, I duly went and asked for a dance with the lady on his table. He sent me a G/T over later.They were good days, with some great people of all ranks.Best Regards AJMc

lewygee
30th June 2010, 17:36
Hi Ron,I don't believe E/F were any worse for this arcane practice than any other mail/passenger ship. However once conscription finished the division got less a kind of gradual emulsification. I guess it will be perpetual by the thoughtless, it comes in a different guise.---You will not encounter quite the same as you witnessed, but unfortunately bigotry,anti-Semitism and a thousand other variations are still with us today.-----Not just shipping companies. As you know there are some great of all walks colour religion and there is the odd Evil B. --- Man it's getting heavy!! Have a nice day AJM.

I sailed on the Golfito around 1959/60 as 2nd elec and the separation was pretty bad. I had previously sailed on a Moss tanker and didn,t experience it there or subsequently. Hughie was the c/elec although Bob Isbister did one trip with us, - agreat guy! I did 6 or 7 trips must say it was special. Fortunately the separation didn,t apply to the engineers and passengers! Good luck to all who sailed with us.

A.J.McMahon
1st July 2010, 19:37
I sailed on the Golfito around 1959/60 as 2nd elec and the separation was pretty bad. I had previously sailed on a Moss tanker and didn,t experience it there or subsequently. Hughie was the c/elec although Bob Isbister did one trip with us, - agreat guy! I did 6 or 7 trips must say it was special. Fortunately the separation didn,t apply to the engineers and passengers! Good luck to all who sailed with us.

Hi Lewygee, You were there same era, that must be Hughie King you refer to, first met Hughie standing-by Manitee in Avonmouth. Sailed a few trips with Bob Isbister, when he relieved Eric Taylor. They were good days, and yes it is strange that the seperation did not seem to apply to the engineering department and passengers. Unfortunately our numbers seem to be going down. Best Regards AJM.

Ron Stringer
1st July 2010, 20:27
Hi Lewygee, You were there same era, that must be Hughie King you refer to, first met Hughie standing-by Manitee in Avonmouth. Sailed a few trips with Bob Isbister, when he relieved Eric Taylor. They were good days, and yes it is strange that the seperation did not seem to apply to the engineering department and passengers. Unfortunately our numbers seem to be going down. Best Regards AJM.

Hughie was quite a character. When I was on th Golfito with him (1960/61) the 2nd leckie was another Scotsman, good looking young guy with wavy red hair. Something suggests his first name was Ken but the crystal is clouding over....