Scottish

Scottish
19th May 2008, 01:47
Hi, everyone from New Zealand, my Dad and Grandad were Navy guys and Granddad was the radio operator on the Trevessa when she went down.
His name was Donald Lamont. Any info on this subject would be great!

gdynia
19th May 2008, 01:56
Welcome onboard to SN and enjoy the voyage

On 3 June 1923, the Hain Line steamer "Trevessa”, loaded with zinc concentrates and on route from Fremantle to Durban, sank very quickly in the Indian Ocean during a violent storm. The 44-crew members scrambled into two lifeboats, some with very little clothes on, and the Captain, Cecil Foster, decided to endeavor to make for Mauritius some 2,000 miles away. With no compass and only enough water for 7 pints per man, 550 biscuits and two cases of condensed milk, they were immediately put on strict rations. The boats soon became separated and with the soaring heat of the tropics some succumbed to drinking salt water which caused them to become delirious and death followed quickly.

With no wind the men had to row, which aggravated not only their swollen hands and feet but also their bodies, which were suffering from extensive salt-water boils. It was only by perfect discipline and obedience to the Captain's orders that they stuck together and on the 23rd day one boat landed on the island of Rodriguez and three days later the second boat landed at Bel-Ombre, Mauritius and a total of 34 men survived. On the second boat the engineer had fallen overboard during rough weather and another crewman died two hours before land was sighted. The survivors in this boat were so exhausted they had to be carried ashore, and the chief cook died soon after arrival. In Lelant church near the font is a stained class window of St Christopher dedicated to the memory of Harry Sparks, who perished on 23rd June, 1923, after the wreck of the S.S.Trevessa in the Indian Ocean.

A monument to the crew of "Trevessa" was erected on Bel-Ombre and on the anniversary of their landing on Mauritius "Trevessa Day" was celebrated which is now become "The Seafarers Day"

The book is “THE LOSS OF THE TREVESSA”. Written by Cecil Foster
First published 1924, Martin Hopkinson & Co, London

Photo of vessel on http://party20042.tripod.com/downalong_st_ives.htm

Bruce Carson
19th May 2008, 02:23
From Michigan, a warm welcome to Ships Nostalgia.
Gydnia has done SN proud with his comprehensive account of the sinking of the ship and the fate of the crew.

Bruce

K urgess
19th May 2008, 12:43
Welome aboard from northern England.
Great to see that SN has met the challenge again.
Well done Gdynia (Thumb)
Explore the ship, Scottish, and enjoy the voyage.

benjidog
19th May 2008, 22:46
Welcome from Lancashire.

I hope you will enjoy the site.

Regards,

Brian

Scottish
19th May 2008, 23:50
Thanks gdynia for the info. and photo. My grandad survived he was in the Captain's lifeboat and lived to the age of 83.
My Dad Don Lamont has a photo of the Captain's lifeboat crew if anyone has a photo of the second lifeboat crew please let me know.
Much appreciated!

R58484956
20th May 2008, 15:14
Greetings Scottish and welcome to SN from a member in the south of England. Bon voyage.