QE2 Rudder(s)?

LoseyJr
13th June 2005, 09:07
I assumed that the QE2 had 2 rudders until I read on the Cunard site the description of the "rudder" singular. Has she but one rudder? I am programming simulations of cruise ships.
George Losey

Fairfield
13th June 2005, 11:37
Indeed.Twin screw,single rudder.

Guest
13th June 2005, 12:58
Indeed.Twin screw,single rudder.
Just a point of interest... which may, as ever, be completely wrong. But I know someone will correct me.

I was chatting with a 2/O years ago about screws and rudders, and he explained that warships with twin screws had the screws designed to throw the water onto the rudder because it made for better maneouverability at the expense of economy. Commercial vessels on the other hand had less need for optimum maneouverability and had screws that threw to water away from the rudder, improving economy.

Dave
(Who always believed whatever anyone told him, as long as they weren't grinning at the time)

trotterdotpom
13th June 2005, 13:21
Just a point of interest... which may, as ever, be completely wrong. But I know someone will correct me.

I was chatting with a 2/O years ago about screws and rudders, and he explained that warships with twin screws had the screws designed to throw the water onto the rudder because it made for better maneouverability at the expense of economy. Commercial vessels on the other hand had less need for optimum maneouverability and had screws that threw to water away from the rudder, improving economy.

Dave
(Who always believed whatever anyone told him, as long as they weren't grinning at the time)

Sounds good Dave, but who knows - I used to tell 2nd Mates all sorts of silly things.

Now that I'm a Prison Officer, I tell people "I'm a screw, just not a very good one!" Hopefully they think I'm a "single screw" and kidding.

John T.

LoseyJr
13th June 2005, 19:43
Many thanks on the rudder problem.. That was a big help.
George

Dave Edge
13th June 2005, 23:29
Traditionally twin-screw warships were built with inward turning propellers and merchant ships with outward turning ones but many modern cruise ships have inward turning screws which I'm sure they wouldn't have if they were less economical. With thrusters to burn slow speed manoeuvrability isn't really a concern for these ships

Guest
13th June 2005, 23:41
Traditionally twin-screw warships were built with inward turning propellers and merchant ships with outward turning ones but many modern cruise ships have inward turning screws which I'm sure they wouldn't have if they were less economical. With thrusters to burn slow speed manoeuvrability isn't really a concern for these ships

Ah Well! My information did date back to well before the moon landing. I guess much doesn't stay true for ever.

Cheers,
DaveM

R798780
14th June 2005, 06:57
Traditionally twin-screw warships were built with inward turning propellers and merchant ships with outward turning ones but many modern cruise ships have inward turning screws which I'm sure they wouldn't have if they were less economical. With thrusters to burn slow speed manoeuvrability isn't really a concern for these ships

VLCC Oloibiri 273000 DW tonnes was built with inward turning proprellors "because" they were more efficient. Twin rudders to boot, which could angle out (starboard rudder hard-a-starboard and port rudder hard-a-port) as "hydrobrakes".... never saw that one tried.

moaf
17th June 2005, 18:25
the rudder stock must have been huge! Imagine trying to stop about the equivalent weight of 1/4 million cars with the rudders!! Could end in tears!