Patroclus

John Ringrose
29th May 2008, 13:09
I was on the Petroculus in 71 as R/O, went with Cunard then. Didn't like doing the Pursers job and letting the Leckie do Radars.

Anyone know Bill Rutter from the Wirral area married to Betty as I recall he was the Chief R/O at that time.

Trevorw
29th May 2008, 22:54
Didn't know Bill Rutter, but as an ex Bluey R/O, please get the name right! It was "Patroculus"!!!!!

Dave Wilson
29th May 2008, 23:06
Didn't know Bill Rutter, but as an ex Bluey R/O, please get the name right! It was "Patroculus"!!!!!

Trevorw,
Never was good enough to sail in BF but I think you should also get the name right. It was 'PATROCLUS'[=P] [=P]

makko
30th May 2008, 04:46
Yes, Patroclus. My grandfather was on the one sunk in 1941 saving a liner from a U-Boot!
Rgds.
Dave R.

John Ringrose
30th May 2008, 14:29
Very Very sorry - memory isn't what it was !!!!!!

Dave Wilson
30th May 2008, 14:46
Very Very sorry - memory isn't what it was !!!!!!

John,

Absolutely no need to apologise. Easily done! I think TrevorW might have something to add.[=P] [=P]

Trevorw
30th May 2008, 16:33
John,

Absolutely no need to apologise. Easily done! I think TrevorW might have something to add.[=P] [=P]
Serves me right for being a smart ****! I never sailed on that partucular Bluey and memory can play some funny tricks!

Dave Wilson
30th May 2008, 17:20
Serves me right for being a smart ****! I never sailed on that partucular Bluey and memory can play some funny tricks!

Trevor,
The only reason I spotted it was because I am presently plowing my way through Homer's 'Odyssey' for the unteenth time. Closest I ever got to BF is when reading such literature.(Thumb)

All the best

Dave

makko
30th May 2008, 23:07
John,
Apologies not needed! We need the mods to change the title perhaps and prune the posts! How rude of me - Welcome aboard! My first vessel was Phrontis, alas it was also her last voyage for BF, sold in Singapore Roads! There are plenty of good photos and BF people here, I hope that you enjoy!
Regards,
Dave R.

sammigreybeard
20th October 2008, 01:04
Didn't know Bill Rutter, but as an ex Bluey R/O, please get the name right! It was "Patroculus"!!!!!

you also should get the name right it was PATROCLUS

BillH
20th October 2008, 07:08
Yes, Patroclus. My grandfather was on the one sunk in 1941 saving a liner from a U-Boot!
Rgds.
Dave R.
Dave,

Interesting about your grandfather. We had until a few years ago, another survivor living in Nottingham. He came to the local branch of the World Ship Society and gave a fascinating talk on his experiences.
His name was Tom Jobling (Lt./Cdr., ret'd)

EdwardParry
22nd October 2008, 14:15
Hello!
I've just joined Ships Nostalgia and saw the name Patroclus - I did 5 round the world trips on her as 4th Engineer back in late 69/early 71. Yes i do remember Bill Rutter as R/O. I'm a member of the BFA but have yet to get up to Liverpool to one of the monthly meetings. I'm taking early retirement at the end of this month so I might(?!) have some spare time on my hands soon. After Patroclus was sent to Keil for 6 months for final commissioning of Kowloon Bay - I did 2 trips on her then left the sea to get back to real life(???)
Hope to hear from some old shipmates at some time
Cheers
Edward

gadgee
22nd October 2008, 14:23
Changed to PATROCLUS

Succour
26th November 2008, 08:39
An obvious nautical flavour sets off this splendid marquetry wall panel clock taken from the Blue Funnel liner Patroclus. The style is typical of the period made popular by the Festival of Britain in 1951. The marquetry design using exotic woods set into satinwood was still popular, though a remnant of pre-war tastes. It was soon to be replaced in ships' public areas by formica laminates, plastics, mosaics and other cheap, modern, easy-to-clean surfaces.
Even removing the pointers of this lovely face could not stop the advance of time.
Succour.

R651400
28th November 2008, 11:59
Didn't the P and H class have a huge cut glass mirror on the main stairwell depicting an Odyssey scene of the ship name?

DURANGO
28th November 2008, 16:30
Didn't the P and H class have a huge cut glass mirror on the main stairwell depicting an Odyssey scene of the ship name? I remember well seing the clock from Peleus at the Greenwich maritime museum some years back

R651400
29th November 2008, 11:41
I remember well seing the clock from Peleus at the Greenwich maritime museum some years back I coasted Jason and the mirror depicted Jason and the Golden Fleece. The placement of the mirror was obviously intended to impress the passengers coming from the dining salon to the passenger accommodation.

Bill Davies
1st December 2008, 22:28
I remember well seing the clock from Peleus at the Greenwich maritime museum some years back

Thanks for that information. 'Peleus' was my last China boat as AB (04/61). I'll take a look next time I am in the area.

nightjar
5th April 2009, 09:26
hi - i,m new to this site -just to say i sailed in patroclus 1961 -62 as junior engineer -great days.

shipmate17
5th April 2009, 11:44
Hi,
Only one WR Rutter in Wirral phone directory.
cheers.

CaptJim
17th April 2009, 17:41
Didn't the P and H class have a huge cut glass mirror on the main stairwell depicting an Odyssey scene of the ship name?

remember them well i was 4th mate on the pyrrhus (52) and 3rd mate and 2nd mate on the perseus (56) and the passengers were impressed as were any visitors. certainly do not come like that anymore

R651400
17th April 2009, 18:03
Before going deep sea, I coasted Peleus and Jason.
The cut glass mirror depicting Jason and the golden fleece comes to mind from one of the better known schoolday Homer stories.
Story, myth or fact?
Instead of panning for gold in ancient times another method was to lay the fleece of a sheep in the river bed and leave it for a lengthy period of time.
Flecks of gold washed by the current were caught up in the wool.
The fleece was then dried, burned in a fire and the melted gold collected from the ashes.

colin stevenson
17th April 2009, 20:12
Dave R
Regarding the last voyage of the Phrontis, I also did the last trip, spending a few weeks in Singapore roads with a skeleton crew before dry docking and handing over to the Greeks.
Colin S

makko
17th April 2009, 21:38
Hi Colin,
I remember you well, 4/E! 3E was Jeff, 2E Ken. I was a little disappointed that the trip was so short but a good learning experience for a first trip eng/cadet. The other cadet was John Banks from Croxteth. My first experience of Bay of Biscay - I forget who told me on board but have never forgotten the two phases of seasickness! (Manhandling/repairing winch motors with the Lecky, T/C casing, Sulzer RD exhaust valves, collapsed evap, lots of auxy overhauls, flooded shaft tunnel and those bloody valve chests with the rotten diaphragms etc.)

Saludos from Mexico,
Rgds.
Dave R

Trident
18th April 2009, 05:01
[Instead of panning for gold in ancient times another method was to lay the fleece of a sheep in the river bed and leave it for a lengthy period of time.
Flecks of gold washed by the current were caught up in the wool.
The fleece was then dried, burned in a fire and the melted gold collected from the ashes.[/QUOTE]

That was very interesting, once wondered about the golden fleece...If I remember right AH used to print the origin of the ships name on all menu's.....Al

R651400
19th April 2009, 12:52
Thanks above Trident.
Not sure where I got that gem of wisdom but remember the same source told me that second to gold the next most valued commodity in the ancient Greek world was amber or elektron (the origin of our word electricity).
Don't think our Danish or Ukrainian colleagues would agree but my source maintained that Odense and Odessa were both called after Odysseus and his odyssey in search of elektron.

John Ringrose
4th June 2009, 08:59
If there is one W Rutter in the wirral directory do you know what it is? - It could well be him

steamship
20th May 2012, 08:16
If there is one W Rutter in the wirral directory do you know what it is? - It could well be him

I see no posts since june 2009. I was an apprentice at Barclay Curles
drydock in scotstoun and we used to hide when we saw Blue flue boats coming in! They maintained their boats very well and as soon as the steam pressure was down we were on top of the boilers doing
all the small valves. I might be wrong but I seem to remember the Patroclus being a B&W top piston job. They always seemed to have a lot of Chinese crew too.

gordy
20th May 2012, 09:32
I see no posts since june 2009. I was an apprentice at Barclay Curles
drydock in scotstoun and we used to hide when we saw Blue flue boats coming in! They maintained their boats very well and as soon as the steam pressure was down we were on top of the boilers doing
all the small valves. I might be wrong but I seem to remember the Patroclus being a B&W top piston job. They always seemed to have a lot of Chinese crew too.

She was a steamship!

When I sailed on her on a coasting trip she had recently settled on the bottom of King George 5th dock in Glasgow! 18' of water in the engine room allegedly.
Condenser door slackened off with something stuck under the main sea water inlet valve.
Oh dear. We were taught to always leave a couple of nuts on loose as a safety measure!

steamship
20th May 2012, 10:31
She was a steamship!

When I sailed on her on a coasting trip she had recently settled on the bottom of King George 5th dock in Glasgow! 18' of water in the engine room allegedly.
Condenser door slackened off with something stuck under the main sea water inlet valve.
Oh dear. We were taught to always leave a couple of nuts on loose as a safety measure!

I stand corrected. There were a lot of blue flue boats that came in. I have surely got them mixed up. I remember the chief engineer on one of them gave me some AH engraved glasses. I kept them for a long time.

Hugh Ferguson
20th May 2012, 12:56
Patroclus in Singapore pre-war.

Pat Kennedy
20th May 2012, 16:00
Patroclus in Singapore pre-war.

But the ship which is the subject of this thread is the 1950 built Patroclus, one of the four steam turbine 'P' class. The others were Peleus, Pyrrhus and Perseus.

regards,
Pat(Thumb)

Photo courtesy of World Ship Photo Library

Hugh Ferguson
20th May 2012, 16:17
Yes, PAT, I appreciate that but I posted the photo of the earlier Patroclus for the benefit of makko (post #4) whose grandfather served in her. The other liner, commissioned as an A.M.C., to which he refers was the Laurentic

Pat Kennedy
20th May 2012, 16:40
Yes, PAT, I appreciate that but I posted the photo of the earlier Patroclus for the benefit of makko (post #4) whose grandfather served in her. The other liner, commissioned as an A.M.C., to which he refers was the Laurentic
I am sure that makko appreciates that Hugh.
Its amazing the number of people who misspell and mispronounce the name of this ship.
I sailed in Peleus and Pyrrhus and worked on all four when in the shoregang, and I believe they were Blue Funnel's finest ships.
regards,
Pat(Thumb)

TonyAllen
20th May 2012, 21:06
I agree pat the P boats were the blue funnel's best I did 2 trips on each in 56/57
peleus and pyrrhus and also the other 2 when on the shore gang and as was said on an other thread "the best of times" tony

makko
21st May 2012, 15:26
Patroclus in Singapore pre-war.

Many thanks, Hugh. The old fellah was sunk again in Crete on a Thos. & Jas. boat, captured and spent the rest of the war in Milag Nord. My father has a photo of him, his sister, mother and father probably taken just before Patroclus was sunk. My father is wearing his father's RN style cap with Patroclus cap band.
Regards,
Dave

sparkie2182
21st May 2012, 17:31
Plenty to be proud of, Dave.

:)

Les Gibson
21st May 2012, 22:12
PATROCLUS Built at Vickers Armstrongs Naval yard Walker on the TYne. Nicknamed Pat Roc a popular and gorgeous film star of the time.

bev summerill
27th May 2012, 21:40
I sailed on the Patroclus on her last voyage with blue flue sailed Amsterdam 3 Sept 1982 sold Singapore 3 Jan 1983 to a ssaudi owner.I have the engine room bell with Glenalmond on as she was Glen line when launched. I was 1st mate on her my last trip with them as I was made redundant after my leave
Bev Summerill

SuperClive
1st August 2012, 18:34
Ah, Patroclus... Bill Rutter... Names I haven't heard in many a long year. Just joined SN and found this thread. I sailed on the good ship Patroclus as a J/Engr with Bill as RO from late 1971 until we took her to the breakers in Kaohsiung in Feb 1973. She was the last of the Blu Flu steamers to go, we went full astern up the beach shuddering to a halt next to the bow section of her sister ship, the Perseus, that had arrived 3 weeks earlier. Sad day. I now live and work on Anglesey but still have connections with the Wirral so will have to look him up in the phone book.

Incidentally, she went to the breakers as Philoctetes as the 'Kremlin' (India Buildings - HQ) wanted to rename the Glen Line Super P 'Glenalmond' and bring her onto Blu Flu's books as Patroclus. We all felt a bit cheated taking her there as Philoctetes. She may have looked a bit scruffy externally but down below, we found loads of Brasso left in the stores and that engine room positively shone to perfection as we rang that final FWE. I've still got the pictures I took on my last watch...

SuperClive
10th August 2012, 10:08
She was a steamship!

When I sailed on her on a coasting trip she had recently settled on the bottom of King George 5th dock in Glasgow! 18' of water in the engine room allegedly.
Condenser door slackened off with something stuck under the main sea water inlet valve.
Oh dear. We were taught to always leave a couple of nuts on loose as a safety measure!

From what I remember, it was in Gladstone Dock, Liverpool, where she sank. And it was definitely more than 18" - more like 18 FEET! There behind the switchboard was a little square of paintwork, about 6" square, and along the middle was the tidemark - clean white above and dirty, oily below. THAT was how far up the water reached! All the motors, gennies and major cabling had to be renewed. I was told it was a piece of 4" x 4" timber that had got lodged under the main SW inlet valve. The J/E THOUGHT it was shut tight, and as you said, took ALL the nuts off the condenser manhole door and gave it a clout and got the shock of his life... Yes, ALWAYS slack off the nuts, THEN break the joint before removing the nuts..!

Up until her dying day in the breakers in Taiwan, we ALWAYS showed new starts that piece of paintwork just to make them understand what COULD happen. A salutory lesson for all.

BFN

Clive

A.D.FROST
10th August 2012, 10:53
From what I remember, it was in Gladstone Dock, Liverpool, where she sank. And it was definitely more than 18" - more like 18 FEET! There behind the switchboard was a little square of paintwork, about 6" square, and along the middle was the tidemark - clean white above and dirty, oily below. THAT was how far up the water reached! All the motors, gennies and major cabling had to be renewed. I was told it was a piece of 4" x 4" timber that had got lodged under the main SW inlet valve. The J/E THOUGHT it was shut tight, and as you said, took ALL the nuts off the condenser manhole door and gave it a clout and got the shock of his life... Yes, ALWAYS slack off the nuts, THEN break the joint before removing the nuts..!

Up until her dying day in the breakers in Taiwan, we ALWAYS showed new starts that piece of paintwork just to make them understand what COULD happen. A salutory lesson for all.

BFN

Clive

All good advice and common sence(thats why god invented vent cocks/make sure its not blocked),reminds me when serving my time,a ship along the fitting out quay sunk.Some one left the cover off SW strainer after working on it at Low water (ship on bottom)(?HUH)

EdwardParry
7th January 2013, 16:47
Hello SuperClive,
As I did 5 trips(7/E to 4/E) on the Patroclus just before she was scrapped I have fond memories of her. Am putting together a colection of photos of the ships I sailed/worked on. Would it be possible to obtain a copy of what you have for my records??? Quite willing to pay postage etc. etc. or is it possible to e-mail them?
Thank you in advance
Edward Parry

oldseamerchant
7th January 2013, 17:49
(7/E to 4/E)


Seven Engineers? No wonder they did not last.(*))

Hugh Ferguson
7th January 2013, 19:01
Always amused me how, when piloting Blue Funnel P's & H's, the master never failed to warn you that the astern movement was very quick and very powerful; it sure was, half astern was always sufficient for normal manouvering even when fully loaded as they always were outward and homeward.

Hugh Ferguson
7th January 2013, 19:18
Many thanks, Hugh. The old fellah was sunk again in Crete on a Thos. & Jas. boat, captured and spent the rest of the war in Milag Nord. My father has a photo of him, his sister, mother and father probably taken just before Patroclus was sunk. My father is wearing his father's RN style cap with Patroclus cap band.
Regards,
Dave

Did you know of the book, MILAG-Captives of the Kriegsmarine, by Gabe Thomas (former Registrar General of Shipping & Seamen).
Four of the people I knew who suffered the same fate as your father all get a mention in this book.
(Gabe's address is:- Tir Uchaf Cottage, Derwen Rd., Alltwen, Pontardawe , West Glamorgan, SA8 3AY)
ISBN 0 9525498 0 8 All the best, Hugh.