Ex RN Engineers in BP

twogrumpy
29th May 2008, 20:47
A thread elsewhere regarding HMS Illustrious, RN Engineer Officers and what use they were to humanity, reminded me of Tudor Pike the engineer super with BP.

We had him on the Trident for drydock in Singapore.

Does anyone else remember him, and did he ever do any time as a seagoing engineer with BP.
twogrumpy(Cloud)

JamesM
29th May 2008, 21:41
twogrumpy,
Don't you mean "Two Door" Pike. Had him as Eng/Super twice, first time was the Centaur at Scaramanga, Greece, second time was the Trident at Sembawang, S'pore.
About as much use as a chocolate fire-guard.
As far as sea time with BP is concerned I don't know, but I do know that I would not have wanted to sail with him on the local duck-pond(even if we had one)!
JamesM
PS What year did you D/D the Trident in S/pore? I was there in 1979.

GeorgeM13
29th May 2008, 23:08
Ah Scaramanga!! where the ship's staff were required to go off the ship and use the toilets arrayed along the top of the dock and on the way passed the dockworkers going in the opposite direction to use any part of the ship for their toilet. You certainly had to watch where you stepped and in the case of the crew that joined before sailing they just had to watch. Put me off Greece for my holidays.
George

twogrumpy
30th May 2008, 07:04
JamesM
If you check my gallery, you will find a picture of the engineers on board for Singers dry dock. Alistair McKinnon C/2e I think.
79 sounds right, was that not her first dry docking after leaving the makers yard 5 years previously.
Understand that BP made a big thing about how well they had done by not docking the ship for 5 years, but the actual owners were a little hacked off by this.
Looks as though you had the same high opinin of Pike as I did, where did the "two door" thing come from?
twogrumpy

PS. The other half reckons your comment on Pike very restrained. And how did "Two Door" get the name?
PPS. The light has Dawned!! Bandar Abbas incident, then you came into the hotel in Dubai, walking wounded.

Steve Hodges
31st May 2008, 19:25
Never came across Mr. Pike, but I did sail with an ex R.N. lecky, whose name now escapes me, but he was a good lad -no complaints about his technical ability. He had sailed on the nuclear subs, and when he had a few would come out with hair-raising tales of life on board. We would stumble off to our cabins severely worried about the safety of the nuclear deterrent!

JamesM
2nd June 2008, 18:38
JamesM
If you check my gallery, you will find a picture of the engineers on board for Singers dry dock. Alistair McKinnon C/2e I think.
79 sounds right, was that not her first dry docking after leaving the makers yard 5 years previously.
Understand that BP made a big thing about how well they had done by not docking the ship for 5 years, but the actual owners were a little hacked off by this.
Looks as though you had the same high opinin of Pike as I did, where did the "two door" thing come from?
twogrumpy

PS. The other half reckons your comment on Pike very restrained. And how did "Two Door" get the name?
PPS. The light has Dawned!! Bandar Abbas incident, then you came into the hotel in Dubai, walking wounded.

twogrumpy,
"Two Door" was just a play on words, mainly to take the hiss out of him, as he was not very well liked by the lads, to say the least!!

Phil Nevin was the C/E, and I think Alistair MacKinnon took over from him.Have some photos which I will post when I can find them.
JamesM

Geoff_E
2nd June 2008, 21:53
The "gentleman" in question (about who's abilities and demeanour I heartily agree) was not alone; there were, unhappily, quite a significant cohort of BP Supts'. who rendered little good to the company and may, ultimately have contributed to the eventual (1986) demise - though money and the managerial proclivities of one Mr. Heaslip did the real damage.

It was was, prior to '86 a great company of people. Let's face it, the abilities of the seagoing staff were paramount - most of the ships were crap! Nostalgically they may have been good but technically they were stone-age compared to what could (should) have been built.

david freeman
8th June 2008, 11:13
I saided as an Eng app. with Tudor Pike the 3rd. Engineer on the BR Vision in 1965? His dream while on watch on the plates off the West Coast of Africa was a crisp freash salad. (Our vitals were mutton, more mutton and even more mutton -(White Crew from Middlesbrough.)
Tudor wore cloggs in the engine room and in the crankcase when required. I later met him later when I was on the Light in Bahrien and he was superintendent. Quite a guy but fair and honest.

Ryder
2nd July 2008, 02:09
I agree with Geoff, Heaslip was total and utter p...k and did untold harm. I remember how we all celebrtaed his demise after years of bull kept him in his job. If I remember he met his end by making a c..ck up over manninga ship which cost the company a lot of money by missing a charter date. I was told that he was told to clear his deck and not darken "Big Panic House" again.
Tony

davet
5th October 2009, 23:12
A thread elsewhere regarding HMS Illustrious, RN Engineer Officers and what use they were to humanity, reminded me of Tudor Pike the engineer super with BP.

We had him on the Trident for drydock in Singapore.

Does anyone else remember him, and did he ever do any time as a seagoing engineer with BP.
twogrumpy(Cloud)

Tudor Pike was 2/E on the 'British Victory' in Aug. 1961 when I joined at Palmers, Hebburn. He did not sail on the vessel. I later met him in the late 70's when he was Superintendent and had no problems with him - his boss was the problem.

chrishandel
6th October 2009, 07:36
Can't remember which ship it was, but the 2nd Engineer christened him two-door hunch back.

Sarky Cut
7th October 2009, 00:18
I knew Tudor before I joined BP in 1962, he was a local man who used to disappear for months on end and reappear for his leaves.

I met him once in my time in BP, in the IOG and he was on one of the 12 or 16 getting his motor time in, never did me any harm and the best bit of advice he ever gave me was regards clothing, get your shirts and shorts from Littlewoods and make sure you take plenty of pants and socks.

See the man was not all bad.

He did have a loud voice though, his wife just used to turn off as did his kids when he was home.

david freeman
21st October 2009, 20:38
Tudor was a steam man in his viens and he solved a problem on an IT ship of the BP fleet in which I sailed. The scams diaphram between the salt water and distilled water collection dome was or had a hairline fracture. We by then were 3months out of drydock with the scams producing no reliable distilled boiler water or had since drydock. The Caird and Rayner VaP (Coil Variety low pressure not vacuum could not cope with the required consumption daily of distilled boiler water. We had no help from any experts and spent many fruitless hours trying to solve the problem at sea. Under vacuum the diaphram on the scams opened up: and salt water feed directly into the distilled section. We were tired and exhausted and TUDor found the fault: Which once realised was a major problem, among the many others we had to solve. On this occasion Tudor was not found wanting. By the way what is the result of feeding 600psi 650'F boilers on feed fit for a scotch boiler? The result is quiet dauting, and spectacular.