Richelieu Scratchbuild 1:200

poulw
5th June 2008, 06:08
As mentioned in my introduction, I have taken some pictures of the current state of my model, but I am in deep trouble trying to post them.(Ouch)

Can someone please help me!

poulw
5th June 2008, 10:49
OK - managed to figure out something. Hope it works out alright.

Here is my model in its current stage in profile, and from the front.

poulw
5th June 2008, 10:56
And here some pics of the superstructure and turret II

liteflight
6th June 2008, 11:31
Poul,

Beautiful model - thanks for showing it to us

Could you tell us about the hull construction, please. With photos if possible, now that you have sorted out the mystery of posting them!

I/we are trying to help some first-timers with hulls from plans - showing them the process always helps with confidence.

Please keep us posted with progress

andrew

poulw
6th June 2008, 12:18
Being a first-timer myself, I certainly know the task. What should be just a bit of work suddently becomes major obstackels with heavy decision making.

I made the hull - plank on frames - before I became aware of forums for modellers, so I have at least one unconventional solution: I made a false deck joined to all the frames so they were absolutely perpendicular to the keel, and also to avoid any warp. This false deck is actually an integrated part of my hull and now forms the base for the planked decks.

Here are some early pictures.

poulw
6th June 2008, 12:56
I steambend my 2mm pine planks over an old fashioned kettle (an electric one doesn't work as it switches off just when the steam starts to develope) or, for the bilge keels, a steam iron. The bilge keels are 3.5mm thick hardwood and joined 10mm into the frames to make them (the keels) more sturdy.

The bow and stern were made out of sandwished blocks (is it called bread-and-butter or something like that?) because of the otherwise heavy bends on the planks. I was lucky enough that the contour of each layer in the sandwich was outlined on the drawing - just had to trim each layer to be 4.5mm thick.

Should I do the hull today, I would do two things differently:

1. I would use a plate of plywood along the keel where the bottom is flat
2. I would use two layers of planking instead of just one

That would save a lot of work sanding and filling afterwards.

Here are some pictures of the bow, and also one how to bevel to give the planks a larger surface for better glueing.

PS: In the pistures, the top plank is actually too high. It was sanded down afterwards to the exact deck level (3mm over the false deck).

poulw
6th June 2008, 13:00
This picture shows the elevation of the main deck in place, and also the prop supports and rudder.

I hope the pictures help.

poulw
6th June 2008, 13:08
Oops!!!

The picture of bevelling is from one of Billing Boats' "How To" descriptions.

(Just to avoid any breach of copyrights).

liteflight
6th June 2008, 13:13
Poul

Thank you for the pictures and explanation.

I thought when I saw a picture of the planking that it looked like pine! What glue did you use?

Is she a working model, or a static one?

Lovely model, and original choice of subject. I was going to ask where you got the plans, then I realised that you have probably told us in the other Richlieu thread, so I won't!

andrew
btw - You might like try a photo using the "scenes" setting of your camera - often a pic of a mountain - if you need everything to be in focus at the same time. It will be slow exposure, but all sharp

poulw
7th June 2008, 00:06
Andrew,

This is my first ever model (haven't even built a plastic kit before), so she is only static. I decided that an R/C model would be too much of a challenge for a 62 year old first-timer. One step at the time - but maybe next time.

The planks, I cut 2x9mm by 150cm so I had them full length (the top plank is 12mm wide though). Pine is relatively flexible, cheap, and easy to work with, and also easy to find with straight grains.

I have only used PVA glue (white glue) on the hull, since everything is wood.

I use three different sets of plans and I cross check all the time.
First I downloaded various drawings from the French government site and converted them to 1:200 scale. They are excellent for the hull, but lack details on deck fittings and the superstructure, and they are all before her 1943 NY refit.
Then I found a printed 1:200 drawing (made by an American, Edward H Wiswesser) in a model shop, and I also downloaded a 1:200 drawing from a Polish site. Both plans showing her after the refit.
But the best help to me is actually a cardmodel I purchased from Moduni in Germany. It is easy to scan and provides good ideas when I need to make templates. It is also good on details and has relatively few errors. I compare to the drawings every time I use it.
And then of course I use whatever information other modellers are kind enough to email me. So in short, I am practically making up my own detailed drawings - part by part - on my laptop as I go.

In respect to pictures, I have now purchased a Panasonic digital camera, a Lumix FZ8. It looks like a good camera, but I also need a tri-pod to try to convert "all unsharp" into "all sharp".

shane67
8th June 2008, 22:34
hello poul nice to see you have taken my advice and joined this forum there appears to be some helpful people on here and your richeleiu better every time i see it . to everyone else this model is the reason i got caught into doing a scratch build and found the perfect ship in the richeleiu although poul is doing her post refit and i am doing her pre refit ,his model is an inspiration to any first timers as what you can do if you put your mind to it !!! and a fair bit of patience .

shane

liteflight
10th June 2008, 08:02
Poul,

Thanks for the source of the plans and drawings.

I see you have the Southern Cross flying - presumably a resident of Oz.

The line between static and sailing models is so fine as to be difficult to draw; you have made the hull with great access and open frames so the option is still yours to take.

My "sharpness" comment was not aimed at "fuzzy" at all. It was the depth of field (the amount of the photo which is perfectly sharp) for taking a pic of a long hull we need a huge depth of field, and this comes from a small aperture/long exposure. This is generally programmed into cameras as the "scenic" setting - and it needs (or benefits from) a rest or tripod. I put the camera on a flat surface and use the timer function so I don't shuggle the camers by pushing the button.

regards,
andrew

poulw
10th June 2008, 11:23
Hi Andrew,

Your guess is correct. I live in the Melbourne area of Oz.

The use of open frames for the hull was my first "major" decision, and it was based solely on viewing pictures of various models on the internet. Open frames seemed like a "trade standard" which I was not to dispute. At that stage I had enough trouble trying to think several steps ahead - plank thickness, deck thickness, etc.

At this stage it is virtually impossible to get access to the hull cavity as the false deck is firmly glued in place and supports my three planked decks (2 months of work and over 800 planks), that would otherwise have to be redone. Also, the prop supports and rudder would have to be reconstructed and all the portholes sealed.
So, a major task to change it now.

If I had planned R/C from the beginning, not much would have had to be done differently, but don't forget that this is my first build and R/C was simply too much to think about - I just didn't have a clue of what it involved and I wanted to get started. And I'm glad I did. The moment I cut the first frame was like taking a step into a complete new world.

At the moment, my only regret is that I didn't start thirty years ago.

liteflight
25th July 2008, 08:05
Poul

Greetings to you in Mid-winter Melbourne

How goes the build?

andrew

poulw
25th July 2008, 13:51
Yes Andrew, it's definitely winter down here and a bit chilly at the moment, and it is also our wet season now.

The build is progressing well. Finished all the platforms with the armoured rib-fences last month, the two main 380mm turrets last week, and the front mast with the type 281 radar this week. Working on some of the many 20mm AA batteries at the moment and made a prototype of the 20mm Oerlikon gun yesterday (came out alright).

Those quad 380mm turrets look absolutely terrifying.

When I have primed the parts I should be able to post some pics. I've got around 50 parts waiting to be primed, but I have to wait for a day with nice weather, as I have no place to paint indoor.

I am now starting to worry a bit about the rigging. I have absolutely no idea of what material to use or how to do it. I am thinking of adding some 2mm brass rings to fix the rigging where it ends on flat surfaces, but that's as far as I've gone.

Suggestions about the rigging would be most welcome as it would be nice to have everything prepared before putting it all together.

liteflight
28th July 2008, 15:16
Poul,

Glad you have been making progress; we look forward to seeing the pictures when you get the time and weather to prime them.

I had a look at the French naval site to see what rigging there is on Richlieu - seems to be radio aerials (of the 4 into one type), crane and hoist rigging and, presumably, signal halliards.

I too don't know how to represent them at this scale, but I think I know how not to! I believe that anything made of cord is going to look "hairy" however you treat it.

I have read experts who pull styrene sprues over a candle to make fine smooth wires - I would use thin copper transformer wire - straightened and darkened; or perhaps black (or better still dapk grey) nylon monofilament fishing line - there are types of line which are "soft" and don't buggle up into tangles.

While on the fishing subject there is a tip that scale aircraft modellers use - they find a suitable size fishing hook, and cut off the bend so that they have a small, perfect (electropolished) eye to fit rigging to. Can be fitted in a neat drilled hole too!

andrew

poulw
29th July 2008, 13:03
Thanks for the rigging tips.

If anyone else should have some "tricks of the trade" in regards to rigging, I would very interested to know.

sydney heads
30th July 2008, 08:53
From the Southern Tablelands of NSW, congratulations from another "Senior Sid" attempting a first try at a wood model, in my case the retired Manly ferry South Steyne.
Your wonderful effort is an inspiration! Thanks for sharing your experiences.
Cheers John

poulw
1st August 2008, 02:08
Greetings Sydney Heads,

Isn't modelling a wonderful way to keep yourself busy. Wonder how I ever had time to go to work.

I have given up for the weather to behave in a way so I can prime all the parts in waiting (either raining or too windy at the moment), so here are some pics of the status quo of the superstructure:

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll242/poulw/1Aug2008Superstructure1.jpg

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll242/poulw/1Aug2008Superstructure2.jpg

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll242/poulw/1Aug2008Superstructure3.jpg

I understand that I am limited to 3 pics per post, so one more post with the main 380mm batteries to follow.

poulw
1st August 2008, 02:14
Second post with pics of the main guns

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll242/poulw/1Aug2008380mmmainguns.jpg

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll242/poulw/1Aug2008380mmturretII.jpg

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll242/poulw/1Aug200820mmOerlikon.jpg

liteflight
1st August 2008, 08:19
Poul

Good on yer!

I, For one am VERY glad you showed us those before priming - you have shown us the combination of materials and parts you use to build up those complex shapes.

Your pictures and workmanship are a cotton-picking inspiration to me. Thank you

I was not only grinning as I opened them in sequence but I found myself wondering what lived in the two enclosures on the top of the upper turret. Pigs, sheep? Then the last picture had two close-in Guns each side, so my wondering was answered.

thanks, and keep showing us, please

andrew

poulw
1st August 2008, 09:50
Hi All,

Can someone please tell me why sometimes the pictures (attachments) are shown as thumbnails, and sometimes as links :confused:

Wonder if I am doing something wrong?????

K urgess
1st August 2008, 10:40
The ability to embed pictures in a post is not available.
The only thing you can do is add them as attachments rather than links as you did in your earlier posts. That gives you a thumbnail at the bottom of your post.
Cheers
Kris

poulw
2nd August 2008, 01:06
Thanks Kris,

I'll try to remember that for next time.

poulw
2nd August 2008, 01:46
Thanks for your comments Andrew.

FYI, I visited a local wholesaler of brass products and bought a wide selection of brass tubes (up to 30mm dia.) with a wall thickness of 0.7mm where possible. Those have been most useful to my build.

At the same time, I also bought some 0.7mm soft brass sheet, which he was kind enough to cut into strips for me, using his large guillotine, in widths of 5mm (for the armoured fences on the superstructure and the 20mm AA stations), 7, 8, and 9mm (for the 40mm AA stations, breakwaters, etc.).

Had I used a sheet cutter or razor saw to cut the strips, I could never have achieved the same finish.

To produce the curves, I just wrap the strip around a brass tube 2-3mm less the diameter I need. Because the brass sheet is the soft type, I can then easily do the final adjustment to the curve around my fingers.

liteflight
5th August 2008, 16:02
Poul

Forgive me if you know this, but nearly ALL brass is the soft type if you anneal it. Heat to red hot, and either allow to cool on its own or drop it into water = soft brass. Works even better with copper!

Yes, you can never have too many tubes!

andrew

poulw
14th September 2008, 11:11
It has now been over one month since my last post, and that month has been spent constructing a prototype of the 152mm secondary guns (Richelieu had 3 such batteries mounted aft).

The smaller the armament gets, the more difficult to construct, and looking at the result I think that I need to do a few modifications. Not major changes, but at this size the 0.5mm thickness of the styrene sheet really starts to show.

I am happy though that the rangefinder came out alright as it is based on a resin casting I made using a silicone mould.

Anyway, this is the result of the prototype:

poulw
8th November 2008, 02:00
With the parts being smaller and smaller, I have lost the enthusiasm a bit and my modelling has become a chore.

So in order not to loose the plot completely, I think I'll take a breather for a while and probably not start again until after Christmas.

liteflight
13th November 2008, 11:02
Poul,

As always, thanks for sharing it with us.
Sorry the little parts are becoming a chore - you have to do what keeps you interested at any time

Interested in your use of the PVC sheeting - I had a Google for it and find it is made about 20 miles from where I am sitting. I know you attach it with contact cement - have you found a solvent cement which welds it?

regards,
andrew

poulw
13th November 2008, 12:39
The PVC cladding is 0.35mm Isogenopak (manufactured in UK). It is very strong, and it has a natural tendency to curve.

I presume it can be "welded" by heat, but I don't know if there is a solvent for it. Suggest you try Google for that.

If you buy Isogenopak wholesale, it is a roll of 10m (cannot remember the width, but probably about 2m).
I remember that you can get it in two different thicknesses, and that I went for the thinner one.

I suggest you visit a plumber, preferably one who specialises in insulated heat pipes (that is what the Isogenopak cladding is for anyway) and ask to buy eg. a piece 1x1m for I guess around 5 cash.
This is what I did, and I haven't even used 1/10th of it yet.

Perhaps ask the plumber about glue at the sme time.

As Isogenopak doesn't exist in Australia (climate is not for heavy insulation), I fortunately got some help from a friend in Europe.

poulw
19th December 2008, 06:46
Me breather didn't last all that long.

After one week I started to get itchy fingers again and continued my "battle" with the tiny parts, and after 4 weeks - it really feels more like 4 months - I have finally finished my small (the tinyest fiddly bits I have ever made) lookouts.

Just to give you an idea of the size, the binoculars are made from 0.5mm and 0.7mm round styrene rods, and the seats are only 1.5mm wide.

- The first pic shows the small lookouts

- Second pic shows a close up of the two different binocular stands

- and the third, the aerial lookouts

I have now also finished most of the 20mm AA stations, and the fourth pic is of the front 20mm stations, right behind the front breakwater.

The last pic is of the rear 20mm AA station with the 20mm Oerlikon armament in place.

The small towers in the background (last pic) are for the M51 rangefinders for the 40mm quad Bofors armament, and in the front is one of the two 120cm searcdhlights.

poulw
19th December 2008, 06:52
For the 120cm searchlights I have used 6mm acrilic rod (to give the impression of glass) with PVC cladding wrapped around. Only dryfitted on the first pic, as I have to paint them later as 4 individual parts each.

For the 60cm searchlights I have used acrylic rod inside a brass tube. The one on the right in the second pic is already masked, and ready to be primed.

Everyone have a nice Christmas and a happy New Year.

arfabuck
26th December 2008, 19:57
Congratulations Poulw!

A remarkable achievement. Watching with great interest as I have been helping a mate build the Richelieu in 1/96 scale. I was only involved in making the hull, the rest is too fiddly for me.

To save time in cutting all the flanges and deck supports by hand, it was done on the lasergraph. 300 of these, 150 of those sort of thing. Far too time consuming otherwise!

Art
NZ

poulw
26th December 2008, 21:51
Thanks Art,

About 40 years ago in a naval museum, I saw a model of a 1700s warship (around 50cm long) made by a prisoner who had carved all pieces out of bones from his dinners, using a knife only. It was an absolutely amazing and beautiful model. Not sure how long it had taken to build the model, but it definitely was not done overnight.

What I am trying to say here is, that every modeller make their models in different ways - their own way. There is no "right" way, and there is no "wrong" way, to make a model. If you like your model, then it is done "right" - because it is your model, and it is your hobby making it. You only make the model to satisfy one person - yourself.

That is also the reason we are all so interested in how other modellers make their models and what techniques they use. And we all share our ways of doing things, because it is really a pad on your back, if you have found a way to show some details that your fellow modellers also want to achieve. So if we can "steal" a good technique to make our model quicker and better, this can drastically reduce the time consumption, and increase our satisfaction at the same time.

A lot of people give up before they even start on a model because they find it "far too time consuming" as you say, but I am glad that you have found a way around it by lasercutting the parts.

I would love to be able to lasercut parts, but unfortunately it is out of my reach. However, for my next model I may invest in a mini metal lathe instead of using my drill press and a file - as you say "too fiddly" and "too time consuming".

arfabuck
27th December 2008, 11:19
Thanks Art,

>>About 40 years ago in a naval museum, I saw a model of a 1700s warship (around 50cm long) made by a prisoner who had carved all pieces out of bones from his dinners, using a knife only. It was an absolutely amazing and beautiful model. Not sure how long it had taken to build the model, but it definitely was not done overnight.

I too saw those models made by French prisoners of war during the Napoleonic Period. When the Science Museum in Kensington auctioned them off for 200 pounds sterling to make room for 'new acquisitions' it made me very angry. Especially as I was at sea and could not bid!

>>What I am trying to say here is, that every modeller make their models in different ways - their own way. There is no "right" way, and there is no "wrong" way, to make a model. If you like your model, then it is done "right" - because it is your model, and it is your hobby making it. You only make the model to satisfy one person - yourself.

I agree wholeheartedly.

>>That is also the reason we are all so interested in how other modellers make their models and what techniques they use. And we all share our ways of doing things, because it is really a pad on your back, if you have found a way to show some details that your fellow modellers also want to achieve. So if we can "steal" a good technique to make our model quicker and better, this can drastically reduce the time consumption, and increase our satisfaction at the same time.

Again I agree. Which is why I post the attached.

>>A lot of people give up before they even start on a model because they find it "far too time consuming" as you say, but I am glad that you have found a way around it by lasercutting the parts.

>>I would love to be able to lasercut parts, but unfortunately it is out of my reach. However, for my next model I may invest in a mini metal lathe instead of using my drill press and a file - as you say "too fiddly" and "too time consuming".

This is a 1/96 scale Richelieu hull - built in one weekend, believe it or not. Over the years I have honed down the production time to hours, not days. Maybe I had better explain that I am not interested in French ships per se and only build IJN to 1945. Originally for warship battling in 1/96 scale but now I prefer to build in 1/48 for the fun of it.



1111930Laser cut lines

11931 Sanding down to the line

11932930She's big at 8' something



My current project is the IJN Shinano,- why? Because she was the largest warship of WW2 and if I can build her then I can manage anything, ( size wise that is ).

best regards,

Art

poulw
27th December 2008, 12:12
A very interesting concept.

It looks like the model Adrian Hart in NZ is building.

arfabuck
27th December 2008, 20:48
A very interesting concept.

It looks like the model Adrian Hart in NZ is building.

Correct. It is Adrian in the pics.

Art

russclark
30th December 2008, 15:40
hello from vancouver isd. canada. wished i new about this forum before as i am also building a 1/192 scale jean bart,using same methods as you,she is finished now but heres a few pics
http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/4549/im000500eo8.jpg
http://img56.imageshack.us/img56/109/im000126km8.jpg
http://img373.imageshack.us/img373/4157/im000166sw1.jpg
http://img373.imageshack.us/img373/6265/im000173cp0.jpg

K urgess
30th December 2008, 16:30
Welocme aboard, Russ.
I hope you find our modelling forum and gallery interesting.
I've tidied up your post a little because embedded images are disabled so only the link works.
Enjoy the voyage.

poulw
30th December 2008, 21:48
Hi Russ,

Welcome to the forum.

Your JB has turned out really well. Thanks for showing the pics.

I don't think I have reached a point yet where I use a certain 'method'. This is my first ever build, so I am just trying to find ways to construct all those little bits and pieces. That's actually why I joined this forum, to get some advice from more experienced modellers when stuck, and I seem to be stuck regularly :) .

At the moment, I am tryying to figure out ways to construct the 40mm and 100mm AA armament, and the ship's boats. I have read about vacu forming, so I am going to give that a go after the holidays.

If you have some close up pics of your JB, I would be very interested in seeing them.

poulw
13th January 2009, 21:42
A happy modelling year 2009 to all.

Over the holydays I finished the boat rack, located between the front and rear superstructure, and one of the two cranes.

poulw
15th January 2009, 07:34
I have now made Richelieu's bell from brass. Since I have no lathe, I used my drill press and a file to make it.
It will not be painted, but left in shiny brass.

The bell will be the last part for a while. From next week on, I will experiment with vacu forming - an all new ball game to me - in order to try and make the seven boats (the hulls) and the six double 100mm AA turrets.

This may (or may not) be an interesting experiment.

arfabuck
15th January 2009, 10:13
This may (or may not) be an interesting experiment.

Congrats on the diligence in making the bell by hand!

What type of vacuum pump will you be using for your vacu-formed parts please?

Art

poulw
15th January 2009, 10:54
I will be using my household vacuum cleaner (filter and bag removed), the styrene sheet size will be limited to 15 x 20cm, and I'll be using one centre hole only with a sheet mesh on top (8 holes/in punched, not woven, which lifts the mesh about 1mm for airflow).

arfabuck
15th January 2009, 19:21
I will be using my household vacuum cleaner.
Ahhh. OK Best of luck.

Art

liteflight
16th January 2009, 08:34
Poul,

Thanks, as always, for sharing your work with us. I find your account and pictures fascinating since you are clearly discovering and planning and developing new ways to do things.

I will be using my household vacuum cleaner (filter and bag removed), the styrene sheet size will be limited to 15 x 20cm, and I'll be using one centre hole only with a sheet mesh on top (8 holes/in punched, not woven, which lifts the mesh about 1mm for airflow).

I'm sure it will work well - I have done similar things for aircraft parts and it went very well. Being Scottish I did a lot of development and discovery with the PVC plastic covers of files. Not stiff enough to be the finished parts but free and perfect for practice.

I have been stretch-forming Footy hulls and doing a spiel about that, on
http://www.rcsailing.net/forum1/showthread.php?t=4835 there might be something useful there for you (perhaps the definition of "OOOOGY" which is the state of the heated plastic at the point of moulding)

best wishes,
andrew

poulw
16th January 2009, 11:02
Interesting link to read. Thanks Andrew.

poulw
19th January 2009, 01:44
I still have a bit of thinking to do about my vucu-forming project, so while thinking I gave myself another little challenge.

On some pictures of Richelieu, I have found up to four benches - for the officers no doubt - at the rear of the main deck.

So, here is a pic of a prototype I have made.

Not sure yet if I'll make them or not - weaving that basket pattern is a killer.
Just joking; I used very fine steel mesh.

Taking into account my ten thumbs and shaky old hands, I wonder if it would be possible to paint a navy blue uniform on the guy.

poulw
24th January 2009, 05:25
First stage of my vacu forming project completed. The 15x19cm box for connecting the vacuum cleaner.

I put a 2mm styrene sheet on top, switched on the vacuum cleaner, checked that there was no leaks, and noticed that the rigid 2mm thick styrene sheet sagged noticeably in the middle due to the vacuum (it took a lot of force to remove while the vacuum was on).

Looking very positive so far. I think it'll do the job.

Forgot to take a pic before the mesh went on, but there is only one 25mm hole in the middle, and it all seems to follow the theory nicely.

The reason to use a 15x19cm box, is that I have cut all my full styrene sheets (76x137cm) into smaller sheets of 19x30cm. This means that by halving these smaller sheets, I should be able to do two vacu forms from each in order to minimize the waste of styrene.

Next stage is to build the frame to hold the styrene sheet, and after that to test the behaviour of the styrene sheet in the oven.

poulw
25th January 2009, 11:03
Got the vacu forming going today - with mixed results at first.

After carefully watching a couple of styrene sheets sagging in the oven and then dropping all the way to the bottom, I was ready for my first go.

As you can see (first pic), I got web all over the place

I reasoned that the webbing was caused by too much stretch, so I made a new test and removed the styrene from the oven a little earlier, ie. less sag, but no matter what I did, I couldn't completely avoid webbing (second pic)

After an hour of soul searching, I thought of the possibility of avoiding the webbing by elevating the moulds. So I made a 10mm elevation and flaired this elevation at the same time (third pic) - and tried again

And the result was surprisingly good (fourth pic) - no webbing and good details

So, tomorrow is dedicated a "series production" of fittings normally difficult to construct in a traditional way.

poulw
18th February 2009, 00:43
I had to take a break from my vacu forming project due to the heatwave we have had Down Under. With temperatures up to 46 degrees C, it was simply too hot to have a hot oven going inside the house.

But yesterday was a cool morning, so I decided to make the hulls for the two whaleboats and the three motorboats, and it worked very well.

It only took me 15 minutes from the oven was preheated and until I had four perfect hulls of each type (I made two hulls in each run). So, today I have started fitting the whaaleboats.

I took a series of pics during the first run, so if anybody is interested, let me know and I'll post them.

poulw
20th February 2009, 08:28
The two whaleboats have now come as far as I can make them for the moment.
The 1.5mm props were a nightmare to make and fit - and in the end you hardly notice them :o

The seat arrangements cannot be properly fitted until the boats are painted, because I need access to mount the timber deck.

The first pic is of one of the boats (dry fitted and without the five front seats though - too fiddly to dry fit)

Te next pic shows the steering assembly and motor housing to be fitted on the deck. The black ring in the steering assy is a small o-ring to be used as the life belt.

Without using vacu forming, I really don't know how else I could have constructed these boats.

arfabuck
20th February 2009, 22:45
Te next pic shows the steering assembly and motor housing to be fitted on the deck. The black ring in the steering assy is a small o-ring to be used as the life belt.


Now there is a novel use for an "O" ring. Never thought of that before. Many thanks. Now to find some big enough for 1/48 scale(Thumb)

arthur

jg grant
21st February 2009, 04:52
Hi Poulw from NZ. I would be very interested to see and hear of your technique with vac formed hulls. I have a six foot model of a Grand banks schooner (picture model booats sesction). These schooners carried as much as twenty dorys in racks and were used for long line fishing on the banks. I have omitted them until now on my model because I thought it too difficult to mass produce identical boats. Thanks in advance .. regards Ronnie

poulw
21st February 2009, 05:21
Hi Ronnie,

Here is what I did in a kind of step-by-step version:

Pic 1: First I placed the support structure in the oven to hold the frame and styrene sheet, so the sheet was free to sag without touching (= getting stuck to) anything, and then I set the oven to 200C.

Pic 2: When the oven was preheated, the styrene sheet sandwiched between the two frames (I used 0.75mm sheets) went on top of the support structure

Pic 3: Next to the oven, the masters for the whaleboat and the motorboat were placed on top of the vacu box with the vacuum cleaner attached

Pic 4: As soon as the styrene sheet started to sag in the oven, I started the vacuum cleaner. When the sheet had sagged about 2.5cm, I quickly took the frame out of the oven, aligned it with the three guide posts, and slammed it down over the masters.

30 seconds later you can remove the sheet and cut out the hulls.

Hope this can help you. Vacu-forming is actually quite easy as soon as you get the hang of it .... Poul

liteflight
3rd March 2009, 17:01
Poul,

Thanks, as always for your photos and the clear descriptions. I have to ask you - where did you get the huge match, though?

I hope that the worst of the heat is over for you guys - you are not so far from the problems.

andrew
This year - finishing lots of projects and ships!

poulw
3rd March 2009, 21:12
The match? I thought nobody would ever notice :D

Yesterday and overnight we had a change in the weather, and we finally got some rain. 10mm in fact. The first rain this year, so I think this will be the end of the fires for now. The nearest fire was 5km from here, so it has been a bit scary.

Meanwhile, I have made the first of three motorboats, again using vacu-forming for the hull.

liteflight
5th March 2009, 08:16
Poul,

A beautiful little boat in her own right
- I see you have the deadlight retaining screws correctly at 4 inch spacing , and all the heads aligned :D

We're relieved that you have the first rains - hopefully that's the peak of the worry past.

andrew

poulw
22nd April 2009, 09:15
I am now ready to start making the fourteen 40mm quad Bofors AA guns.

Having spent the last two days drawing up the parts, tomorrow I am ready to try if everything fits together. Attached is a pic of the parts for the prototype.

The four amber parts in the middle are resin castings.

Not made up yet for the prototype is the rear rail and the foot switch arrangements for the fire control. The fire control arrangements are linked to the small seats shown in the top right hand corner.

I have also attached my drawing of the assembled prototype (the individual parts are on a separate drawing)

Whichever way it goes, I should hopefully be able to show a pic of the result tomorrow.

poulw
26th April 2009, 01:55
It didn't quite work out as planned.

All parts, except for the gun shield, seem to fit perfectly. The shield creates too much tension and tends to push all the corners out when fitted.

So, back to the drawing board.

jg grant
9th May 2009, 00:35
Thanks for the reply Poul. This gives me something to work with. Regards Ronnie