Scratch-built brig

liteflight
6th June 2008, 12:40
Please forgive me, I am a little happy

Trial sailed my brig, Volante last week.

Almost flat calm weather but I realise that this is the safest way to start. I was so keen to get on the water that the sheets were fitted with bank-adjustable adhesive devices (sticky tape). Winches will follow

I look forward to posting some "roaring forties" pictures in the fullness of time

andrew

Shipbuilder
6th June 2008, 20:16
hi Andrew,
Nice little model, pity not really enough wind. My curiosity is aroused as to why you have one "yellow" jib set - why not all white?
Bob

liteflight
9th June 2008, 12:58
Bob, frustrating in the wind, but it WAS her first time under sail, and I had only the short "conformal" keel fitted - as shown in the third photo.

So looking back it was probably a wise start to becoming a proficient brig sailor - I will aim to build up to the roaring forties.

Yellow flying jib? Would you believe me if I said it was for orientation? No?
Well, the other F&A sails are cut from a retired white shirt (60%polyester) and aged with coffee, but it ran out during the trying of headsail shapes.

I normally cut paper patterns and look at them in situ for two or three days to see what they tell me - so this is about the third set of headsail patterns and jibs I have made. The yellow is the palest umbrella nylon in my sail material box.

The square sails are cut from a HORRIBLE superwhite nylon from the 1960s which has not faded at all (worst luck) and they are terribly bright and shiny. I have killed the white with coffee and a rinse of cream acrylic.

The yellow jib will not appear on the next outing

andrew

Shipbuilder
9th June 2008, 20:54
Hi Andrew,
I can accept your explanation of orientation - just wondered. Reminded me of Antwerp, 1968. We were stuck there on S.A. ORANJE during seamen's strike. The previous voyage, I had been instructing 2nd R/O in rudiments of plank on frame & he produced fine little brigatine. Persuaded him to sail it at Antwerp. This is result. returned to ship to drown sorrow in a few beers. returned next day with grapple made from bit of old aerial wire & retrieved model, so happy ending after all.
Bob

liteflight
10th June 2008, 08:49
Department of Small World!

Oranje was the troop ship on which my parents met in 1940 or so on a run to Cape Town!

Glad the brig was recovered! I will stuff mine with table tennis balls or similar so that I never need them! When the "official" ball changed size I was given many boxes of the old ones - I believe its the last common use of celluloid!
andrew

Shipbuilder
10th June 2008, 09:58
Hi Andrew,
Different ORANJE. Mine was the S.A. ORANJE (ex PRETORIA CASTLE). When they sold her to South Africa, we continued to man her until the end of her days.

Good idea using old table tennis balls if you have a supply. In my last sailing model, I used old 35mm plastic film tubs, & stuffed the gaps with bubble wrap. The sinking model was a bit too small for either though. Was only about a foot long, but sailed quite well. It sank because we hadn't secured the main hatch, it was just placed in position & when a heavy gust brought water on deck, the hatch floated off - sank very realistically though as the photograph shows. It was not a quick dive to the bottom, but a graceful tilt followed by a slow descent taking about two minutes!
Bob

dickH
10th June 2008, 10:26
I sailed on Pretoria Castle 1955 Southampton-Cape Town via Las Palmas.
Over 40 yrs later, I built a 7ft. long working model of her.
This can be viewed at www.modelboatmayhem.co.uk, go to "Your models" and scroll down to my pics of Pretoria, with Northern Star.
cheers
dick

Shipbuilder
11th June 2008, 08:44
Hi Dick,
I saw your PRETORIA CASTLE when you put it on & recginised her immediately, very nice model. I enjoyed my time there, but she never looked as well painted white & I was never too keen on the new name either. I can understand they wanted a South African name, but even ORANJE RIVER would have been better than S.A. ORANJE, or even just PRETORIA! The other one, TRANSVAAL CASTLE became S.A. VAAL, I sailed in her as well under both names.
Bob

Leccy
11th June 2008, 09:17
I'm now an artist and sometimes I'm asked to restore old oil paintings, often with holes in them. I've found that calico is a good flexible material for this purpose, would it be suitable to make model sales? it would look authentic.

Leccy
11th June 2008, 09:22
Sorry SAILS

Shipbuilder
11th June 2008, 09:43
Hi Leccy,
Don't really know for sailing models, as it is now many years since I built one. I now specialise in miniature static models that are usually between 3 inches & 15 inches long. When I make miniature sailing ships, I just use airmail paper these days. Click on "Miniature Merchant Ships" below for examples.
Bob

Leccy
11th June 2008, 10:15
Thanks Bob, nice site, I suggested calico because I thought it would be functional (depending on the size of the model) as well as looking right. Just an idea, I'll leave it to the experts.

liteflight
12th June 2008, 08:56
Thanks for the comments
Leccy; calico might be ideal - depends on the weight and the way it hangs. For the first suits of sails I prefer to use a synthetic material since I can cut it out with a soldering iron and it is self-hemming.

I have a supply of the old-fashioned drawing linen, and this is ideal when the size is washed out of it. Thin, fine, creamy grey colour, but it needs hemming and bolt roping, etc.

The brig will sport synthetic sails for a while longer - there is a lot of adjustment required to make the sails suit the "oles, and probably some to help the intrepid skipper learn about the model!

A rudder extension is planned (in the style of Richard Webb) downward, outward and balanced, and removable.

deeper sailing keel also planned (with lead ballast as either cylinder or a pair of half-cylinders cast in thermalite block)

andrew

liteflight
17th June 2008, 08:55
Progress - deeper keel made with greatly simplicated bulb retention system - what could be simpler than three tiewraps?
And they allow me to adjust fore and aft trim, too!

andrew