Athena

Bob S
16th June 2005, 18:53
With a really unattractive aft end, the ATHENA is seen sailing from Tilbury today (16th June).
Built in 1948 as the infamous STOCKHOLM of the ANDREA DORIA disaster, she now operates under the Classic Cruise banner.
(See STOCKHOLM thread)

Fairfield
17th June 2005, 05:48
Truly amazing that she is still with us.Has had some career! Good to see those shots.

Doug Rogers
17th June 2005, 06:08
That really is amazing, find it hard to believe that she is still around!!. Good pictures Bob

pigpenz2
1st July 2005, 23:00
Hi, can anyone please tell me what the monstrosity is on her stern??

Ron B Manderson
1st July 2005, 23:19
Hi, can anyone please tell me what the monstrosity is on her stern??
Ah don't worry just a growth
The tablets will sort it out
Ron lol

fred henderson
5th July 2005, 20:01
This lady has certainly been around: -
Delivered to Svenska Amerika Linjen in 1948
1960 - Bought by the Free German Trade Unions Confederation of East Germany and renamed Volkerfreundschaft.
1985 - Renamed Volker and laid up in Oslofjord then Southampton
1986 - Renamed Fridtjof Nansen and towed to Oslo for use as a refugee accommadation ship.
1989 - Bought by Starlauro and towed to Genoa for refit. Plan abandoned.
1990 - Bought by Genoa warfinger Vittorio Chiesa.
Eventually bought by Compania di Navigazione Nina and completely rebuilt by Chiappella Shipyard, Genoa. Apart from the hull nothing remained from the old ship. The strange appendage at the stern was added during this rebuild, probably to meet modern stability requirements.
1994 - Redelivered as Italia Prima and chartered to the German travel agent Neckermann.
1999 - Renamed Valtur Prima for charter to Navyclub
2003 - Renamed Caribe and chartered by Festival for cruises to Cuba. Laid up after collapse of Festival
2004 - Sold to Classic International

Fred

Ship'sEnthusiast
19th July 2005, 16:37
Has someone ever seen her postcard as CARIBE by Festival Cruises?

Has anyone travelled on her with Festival Cruises? What was your opinion?

I had the chance to visit her twice as Italia Prima and she was excellent inside, and according to a friend that recently made her maiden cruise as ATHENA the service is quite good...I hope that this old liner with this unique "look" will survive for many years....

In the meantime, in my opinion Arcalia Cruises is perhaps the only company of the world owning "real ships"- ARION ( EX-ASTRA); PRINCESS DANAE, FUNCHAL & ATHENA....do you agree?

Regards

D.A.

moaf
19th July 2005, 17:13
pigpenz2 - A bit delayed I know, but that weird construction is basically a cheap form of stabiliser. It increases the water area of the ship and reduces pitch and roll. Not that common on cruise ships because of the looks but quite a few ferries have had it done to them.

fred henderson
20th July 2005, 23:22
I am sorry to be a Jeremiah DA, but there is a very limited market for vintage cruise ships. My daughter wanted a vintage Rolls Royce for her wedding, but would not trust it to take her to Heathrow for her honeymoon. Cruise passengers and travel agents want the space, facilities, comfort and reliability that can only be found in modern ships.

You refer to Arcalia Cruises; the same ships are listed in my industry reference under the name Classic International Cruise. This company carried 37,000 passengers in 2004, down from 49,000 in 2003. They managed a load factor of 86% of their lower berth capacity. The Carnival Group carried 6.3 million passengers in 2004, up from 5 million, with a 106% load factor.

With the current trend in oil prices, tighter safety and environmental regulations, the trading future for vintage cruise ships is not looking good. At the end of the day a "real ship" is one that earns its keep.

Fred

Piero43
21st July 2005, 15:09
This lady has certainly been around: -
Delivered to Svenska Amerika Linjen in 1948
1960 - Bought by the Free German Trade Unions Confederation of East Germany and renamed Volkerfreundschaft.
1985 - Renamed Volker and laid up in Oslofjord then Southampton
1986 - Renamed Fridtjof Nansen and towed to Oslo for use as a refugee accommadation ship.
1989 - Bought by Starlauro and towed to Genoa for refit. Plan abandoned.
1990 - Bought by Genoa warfinger Vittorio Chiesa.
Eventually bought by Compania di Navigazione Nina and completely rebuilt by Chiappella Shipyard, Genoa. Apart from the hull nothing remained from the old ship. The strange appendage at the stern was added during this rebuild, probably to meet modern stability requirements.
1994 - Redelivered as Italia Prima and chartered to the German travel agent Neckermann.
1999 - Renamed Valtur Prima for charter to Navyclub
2003 - Renamed Caribe and chartered by Festival for cruises to Cuba. Laid up after collapse of Festival
2004 - Sold to Classic International

Fred

For precision sake: Calata Chiappella (Chiappella Wharf) is the name of the site of the Shipyard in Genoa harbour. The name of the firm is MARIOTTI Shipyard.
Piero

Ship'sEnthusiast
21st July 2005, 18:30
Fred,

I agree with your opinion,in fact it is quite sad to see all great liners going to breakers...

However I think that exists a good market for "old ships"...as an example the OCEANIC of Pullmantur is overbooked...and Arcalia - management fleet company for Classic Int.Cruises, still bets on these ships because with a renewal and a good service on board they can be really competitive.

The same is valid for Club Cruise of Holland,Majestic cruises,Orient Lines,etc...

The main reference must be in which type of market should a company bet on...certainly passengers that travel on modern cruise ships do not like them, having all modern facilities, but real sea passengers certainly will keep them alive!

Regards

D.A.

fred henderson
21st July 2005, 22:01
For precision sake: Calata Chiappella (Chiappella Wharf) is the name of the site of the Shipyard in Genoa harbour. The name of the firm is MARIOTTI Shipyard.
Piero

Thank you Piero. I have for many years regarded Mariotti as the world leaders in successful major conversions for cruise ships. I had not realised that Chiappella was the name of their site. The wonderful thing about Ships Nostalgia is that you learn something new every day

Fred

fred henderson
21st July 2005, 22:34
Fred,

I agree with your opinion,in fact it is quite sad to see all great liners going to breakers...

However I think that exists a good market for "old ships"...as an example the OCEANIC of Pullmantur is overbooked...and Arcalia - management fleet company for Classic Int.Cruises, still bets on these ships because with a renewal and a good service on board they can be really competitive.

The same is valid for Club Cruise of Holland,Majestic cruises,Orient Lines,etc...

The main reference must be in which type of market should a company bet on...certainly passengers that travel on modern cruise ships do not like them, having all modern facilities, but real sea passengers certainly will keep them alive!

Regards

D.A.


I fully agree that Oceanic is the exception that proves the rule, but most of the smaller dedicated cruise companies are operating old ships because they cannot afford new construction. The larger cruise companies have established their own subsidiaries to operate their older tonnage (Island, Ocean Village, P&O Australia, Orient, etc) so when the occasional middle aged ship comes onto the market it is snapped up by companies that are backed by the financial clout of larger non-cruise operations - Fred Olsen, MSC, Saga, Orient, etc. The operators of old tonnage are also careful to avoid the tough regulations applied to ships entering US waters but all areas are becoming more concerned by safety and environmental standards.
I wish the operators of older ships all the luck in the world, as I think they will need it to survive

Fred