Whale Ships

John Rogers
16th June 2005, 20:38
Has any one ever sailed on a Whaling ship??. One time back in the 50s I was sent down by the Shipping Pool to one named the 'Northern Star or Cross" (I have forgotten the exact name,) its one I like to forget,she was berthed in Avonmouth and as I approached her gangway I got a whiff of this awful stench,almost made me upchuck, one of the dockers nearby said the smell was worst on board. I went back to the Pool and said they didn't need anyone. She had a large opening in the stern to pull the whales in to cut them up. I never did meet anyone that sailed on one. (EEK)

R58484956
17th June 2005, 14:39
On entrance to Durban they had a whale cut up slipway and you could smell the stench of that long before you arrived., The best known whale factory ship was the "Baleana" Today in Reykjavik (Iceland) they have 4 whalers in working order, but I was told they only catch whales for scientific purposes, just like the japs and norwegians do. How much scientific knowledge do they want. The Icelanders said the whales were eating too much cod but on opening them up no cod has ever been found

japottinger
17th June 2005, 15:36
Would that be a Salvesen whale factory ship? All had prefix names such as Southern Empress, Princess, Empress, Venturer,Collins, Opal, Harvester etc etc

R58484956
17th June 2005, 16:44
United whalers ltd ,15715 tons, registered london and she was an up & downer.

John Rogers
17th June 2005, 17:40
It could of been the Southern Cross my memory is good but that ship I forgot real fast but the smell remain in my nose to this day.
They also told me they had all kinds of free perks and lots of overtime if you signed on. No thank you.!!

R58484956
17th June 2005, 17:55
There was a Southern Harvester, a whale factory ship of 15364 tons, registered in Leith and owned by South Georgia co ltd ( Chris Salveson co)

trotterdotpom
18th June 2005, 04:43
I sailed with an ex whaling master. He used to sober up enough to come to dinner on a Sunday. Sometimes he'd come into the radio room so drunk he was incoherent and when you couldn't understand a word he said, he'd fly into a rage and start punching and kicking the Oceanspan (Transmitter). I met him again later and dried out he was a totally different man, almost fatherly.

Those were the days, my how we laughed.

Dave,

Was he the one who liked to transit the Great Australian Bight via Macquarie and Hern Islands?

When I was little, there was a girl in my class who's father worked on whaling ships. One day she brought a stuffed alligator to school, that was enough for me... I couldn't wait to run away to sea. However, I'm far to environmentally friendly to have sailed on a whaling ship, although I do remember seeing and smelling the slipway at Durban, and the nearest I got to a stuffed alligator was removing the used bandages from the stuffed camels in Suez!

John T.

Rhiw.com
18th June 2005, 09:52
Two photos taken in the South Atlantic during the 1950's. The catcher "Setter II" and crew change day. Two Master Mariners from my village worked down there, one in the 1930's and the other when these photos were taken. Most of the photo collection would be deemed Politically Incorrect in today's climate, but historically very important, Regards Tony.

wully farquhar
13th September 2005, 17:04
[b]have A Read Of The Book, (shetland Whalers Remembered)and You Will Find Out All About Whaling Down In The Antarctic

janbonde
13th September 2005, 22:30
To RHIW.com Would the other Master have been Captain Sam Williams ,I was with him for almost a year

Tmac1720
13th September 2005, 22:53
I have a photo of the Juan Peron's flensing deck I'll dig out and post. It is an interesting photograph.

fredkinghorn
14th September 2005, 11:57
Served as a Messboy, Southern Harvester ( Salvesen of Leith ) 1953/54. First trip to sea. 7. 17.6p per month, 10p. per hour overtime. 12 hr. shifts, day /night. As we were at sea it was O.K. for those under 18yrs. to work a nightshift. I only did the one trip, but would do it again as I went away a wee boy and came back as a man. It was tough but, you soon figured out that Mummy wasn't there to hold your hand when things got tough. I was cheeky to a deckhand, I'll never forget him, he just turned round and flattened me. I wasn't cheeky again. I met him many years later and asked him if he remembered. He said no, but I must have deserved it ! I bought him a drink anyway.

There is a Whaler's club in Leith if anyone is interested.

Fred.

Succour
20th September 2005, 06:21
There's a grand Pic of Salvesen's Southern Harvester and Southern Venturer,
moored at the Mill Dam. You can find this at the 'Tyne Tugs' website under the link 'Ships on the Tyne' at the page bottom, along with other interesting Tyne stuff. Thanks for the welcome to Ships Nostalgia.

ruud
6th October 2005, 12:13
Ahoy,
Here another painting from Henk, it's a whale catcher, rebuilt in 1951 at the wharf "de Hoog" at that moment in old Delfshaven, where Henk has worked as a docker from the beginning till the delivery, was built as corvette, and layed up for a long time.Here his expression:
http://img76.imageshack.us/img76/3289/walvisjagerhvdveer3fw.th.jpg (http://img76.imageshack.us/my.php?image=walvisjagerhvdveer3fw.jpg)

neil maclachlan
6th October 2005, 16:42
Hi Shipmates,
Remember when the Whale factory ships used to tie up at Gladstone Dock in Liverpool. I think the whole crew used to be in the pub at the dock gate,and I think "Fredkinghorn" the deckhand who filled you in was the same one that started all the fights in that pub?
Neil Mac.

rstimaru
6th October 2005, 19:36
I once came stern of the whale factory ship Baleadon i think she was called,I am not to sure of the the name the stink was to much i don,t think anyone was reley interested she was in scotland i think Bob

Pat McCardle
6th October 2005, 20:00
Hi Shipmates,
Remember when the Whale factory ships used to tie up at Gladstone Dock in Liverpool. I think the whole crew used to be in the pub at the dock gate,and I think "Fredkinghorn" the deckhand who filled you in was the same one that started all the fights in that pub?


Neil Mac.

I heard that the crew used to have a 'Whale of a time' in that pub!!

Pompeyfan
6th October 2005, 22:37
Lets hope they stay in the pub because the way things are going, these wonderful creatures will soon be extinct.

brian lewis
14th October 2005, 22:49
The whalers even came to Manchester the smell was even worse than the canal in the summer.

Derek Roger
15th October 2005, 01:12
I lived in Durban as a kid and fished with my Dad where the whalers used to tie up for Grunter . The fleet was tied up at the far end of the Grain Elevator wharf. As a kid I was fasinated bye the harppon station forward and the walkway from the acommodation to the gun .My Dad worked for the Natal Mercury and one of his pals was a well know shark fisherman. He caught a world record shark from the bluff and it was displayed in a tent along the beachfront ( 1 shilling entrance fee ! ) We got in free as Dad has his press card . I still remember touching the beast ; its skin was like sandpaper .
We would visit the Bluff from time to to time to watch the whales being hauled up the slip . Sharks would attack the carcasses and take huge chunks of blubber from them . I was about 9 years old and much impressed.
My brother Cameron was at Riversdale Tech Liverpool with the son of Salvesons but they have lost touch.
I now go and watch whales in the Bay of Fundy for sport .
Changed Days ???

Regards Derek Roger

neil maclachlan
17th October 2005, 02:20
Hi Derek,
When you mentioned The Bluff it brought back memories to me,I sailed on The Stanvac South Africa and we were the Durban refinery ship. If my memory serves me right there was a coaling wharf there and right across the harbour was the South African Naval Station. I remember seeing a Royal Navy cruiser coming in on a visit,the Marine Band was playing on the foredeck and all the lads were lined up wearing their whites,what a sight and feeling of pride we all felt.
Nostalgia,
Neil Mac.

Pompeyfan
17th October 2005, 11:49
You are lucky there are still whales to watch for sport Deryk. If the greedy short sighted morons have their way hunting them to extinction, there will be nothing for future generations to enjoy OR make future money out of?!. David

kelgels
19th January 2006, 13:07
Go to either the Greenpeace or sea shepperd sities and you will find pictures of Japan's so called research fleet in the southern ocean. You will also see on the Greenpeace site the results of the Artic Sunrise vs Nissin Maru, the Artic Sunrise come off second best.

Jeffers
19th January 2006, 19:07
I remember as a boy growing up on the Tyne seeing the whaling ships arriving in the river.
It must have been the Southern Harvester and the Southern Venturer. It seemed to be something that happened every summer. I remember it being sunny anyway!

Paul UK
19th January 2006, 20:23
As the Japs are so good at making artifical things why do they have to kill whales, Sorry this site is not for this type of rant.

Paul

kelgels
20th January 2006, 13:16
Paul

My point exactly. Every other nation in the Antarctic has non leathal ways of conducting research on Whales. The technology used was proberley created by the Japs in the first place, so why do they have to use lethal means when no one else does?

Yes OK, perhaps one or 2 whales you I can understand but 900+ for the purposes of Research? Seems a little excessive to me.

R58484956
20th January 2006, 14:57
Thread #24 Baleana 15715 tons. In Rekjavik there are 4 whale catchers in sea going condition. 2 are apparently going to put to sea for scientific purposes or so the Whale Museum told me.!!!

ron hansen
22nd January 2006, 14:15
no comment taking the fith amenmant

fredkinghorn
22nd January 2006, 15:46
Here we go ! Unfortunately for the whale, the Japanese eat them. To get around the ban on catching whales for this purpose, they have to resort to other means. We only ate whalemeat during WW2 when we could get it. I ate it when I was with Salvasen on the Southern Harvester and it was not too bad.
I wonder how many of us will be going over to France for a holiday. Will there be protests on the force-feeding of geese for fois gras? Have any of you guys ever heard a lobster being boiled alive ? we can all meet outside Gordon Ramsay's restaurant.
How about not eating Mr. Matthew's turkey or battery chicken ?
I don't like the idea of harpooning animals and their subsequent death, but I occasionally ( if I'm lucky ) catch a trout on a hook, play it until it is exhausted, reel it in and then batter it on the head with a weighted bar to kill it, I then take it home and eat it. Am I any worse ?

fred.

" go ahead punk..make my day "

jim barnes
22nd January 2006, 15:58
I too have smelt the one in Durban? I was on a Oil Rig supply vessel in Mulgrave Nova Scotia and a whaler tied up astern of us, well as quoted what a stink ! any way our cook swopped some steak with them for some whale meat, we had some whale meat pies for a while after, different tast but not unpleasant (OILY) (should have been posted in ships fare) (Night)

benjidog
22nd January 2006, 16:35
I am not going to try to justify the Japanese and others in continuing to kill whales, but to put in context, according to the Independent on Sunday Newspaper today, whales are killed by their hundreds by the use of sonar by various navies. If it is true, (would a newspaper tell porkies?) You can't even justify that in terms of feeding people.

(This article was written in the wake of the hallaballoo about a whale that swam up the Thames and died despite rescue attempts.)

ron hansen
22nd January 2006, 21:25
some 80% of the catches from these ships was landed in newcastle im talking about the 70s when there was still a big fleet here and the beef was used to produce pet food i think it was spillers at that time so a lot of little rovers and tabbys were getting stuck into moby too.

cboots
24th January 2006, 00:40
I am not an animal rights activist myself but in fairness to those that are, I think that it is worth pointing out to Fredkinghorn that people who protest against the killing of whales usually also protest about the other forms of animal abuse to which he refers. From my point of view, and I eat battery chooks, and enjoy a spot of fishing occasionally, the difference is that many whale species are in grave danger of extinction, unlike trout or even French geese. For what it is worth, I have been informed by some who claim to know about such matters that the eating of whale meat in Japan is not traditional and stems from quite recent times.
CBoots

david
17th July 2006, 07:46
We have been watching the annual Humpback migration over the last few weeks, giong past my place to their warm water breeding grounds up north.

I have been following the various threads and posts on our site.

One question please... Can anyone give me a website where I can see the Nissin Maru, the processing vessel which is the object of the Greenpeace fury?

Regards
David D.

R58484956
17th July 2006, 19:42
Go to http://www.greenpeace.gen.nz/gallery/press05?page=5. Page 5 picture No; 134

Derek Roger
18th July 2006, 02:47
I have never sailed on a whaler ; but have read a bit and it was a hard life and the sailors who manned them were some of the very best . We should not
belittle the feats that these men achieved .
It is easy to be a monday morning quaterback some decades later and with 20/20 hindsight say how wrong it all was !
The same can be said for the fishery in general ! ( Yet all still have their fish and chips ! And Yes the Cod are very much an endangered species )
I often reflect on the time I was serving in Moss tankers and our ships were carrying 30,000 tons each cargo of Naptha to Vietnam or Okinanwa during the war . How much damage was I reponsible for ???? At the time we all believed in what we were doing ! In fact we put in for medals to the US for being in a war zone ( They were turned down as we were civilians ) Im glad now as I dont think I would want to wear that badge today.
I fully agree that there should be no more Whaling as the species is i a very fragile state ; I agree that the Japanese dont need 900 tons for resarch ( but would be open to listen to arguments to the contary )
Whale watching probably generates more revenue that the killing of the mammels ever did ( Bit like the Safaris in Africa now ; photography rather than lead )
Still I like to keep an open mind and listen to all sides of a story .
With respect to the initial controvosy re the Hunting in the Faroes I think I would support tradition and a way of life of humans without getting to " Bent out of shape " The same would go for the seal hunt ( there is some serious culling to be done to protect the Cod !)

lagerstedt
18th July 2006, 06:21
Dose anyone know how many gallons or litres of whale oil it took to fill a barrel and how much oil they got from one whale? I recently found a web site the gave all the arrivals of whaling and other ships for the year 1843. The listings gave the number of barrels each whaling ship was carrying and the lenght of time each ship was at sea. One whaling ship returned to port after more than 30 months at sea with over 1000 barrels of sperm whale oil on board. When I find the site again I will publish it here for you to read. All the ships listed were sailing ships.

Regards

Blair Lagerstedt
NZ

Freo
18th July 2006, 07:42
As an engineer,I sailed on a whale factory ship called the Willem Barendz, it had been converted to process pilchards into fish meal for fertiliser. We used to operate off the coast of Mauritania, Western Sahara, and the Canary Islands. The smell was pretty revolting, but one got used to it after awhile.

(Night)

Freo

dom
18th July 2006, 08:14
whaling ship 'globe'
built nantucket 1815
capt G.W.Gardener
deck lenghth 95ft 300ton.
1st trip over 2,000 barrels sperm oil-1815-1818
2nd trip again over 2,000 barrels sperm oil-1818-1820
3rd trip again over 2,000 barrels sperm oil-1820-1822

64,000gals-250 tons
the book goes on to say 73 whales killed and many more lost.
book 'demon of the waters' true story of the mutiny on the whaleship 'globe'
author gregory gibson bought it yesterday reduced from $24.55 to 6.95 aust

some times i sits and thinks and some times i just sits

john hughes
29th January 2008, 23:41
did one trip with UNITED WHALERS not on factory ship, on MV POWELL whale
tanker they had another MV BISCOE.during trip had 54 stops main engine
DOXFORD cooling leaked like a sieve,I wasELECTRICIAN spent more time in
the crankcase caulking than on my own job,on the way home CHIEF asked are
you comming back next trip to whitch Ireplied enough said.
Iwonder anyone outthere come across STAN ALLEN from SPEKE. JOHN HUGHES

Blackal
30th January 2008, 21:23
My father was an engineer and ultimately superintendent for Salvesens catchers in the 50s. I've now inherited his photo album (I believe he had pics published in National Geographic at the time), scrimshawed whales' teeth, Sperm whale's eardrum (EEK) , Whale oil production figures for years 57/58/59, the annual refit lists for the catchers and all manner of things that he kept all these years.

I believe there was a converted catcher in Aberdeen harbour this week(Ocean Swift - ex Whaler-65, built 1957 in Netherlands) that drew a fair bit of interest.

Al (Thumb)

dr bob duncan
25th February 2008, 02:59
In 1955 Salvesons used a helicopter to operate from the factory Southern Venturer and search for whales. It was from Bristows, who became famous for supplying oil rigs later. There is a picture of it on the back cover of Gibbie Frazers book Shetland Whalers Remember.

Riptide
25th February 2008, 03:32
Sailed with Salvesons,met quite a few ex whalers,Jake Nesbit was on dk.& Morris Skillen engineer,just too mention a few & all great guys who wern't afeared of anything.Kenny.

Manwithplan
5th March 2008, 16:20
I worked on the Interpeche which, I understand was the ex WILLEM BARENDSZ, ex SOUTHERN HARVESTER. She had been converted in to thew Fish Factory ship and we had up top 16 catchers supplying us with fish to process in to meal, oil and frozen fish. Mainly mackerel and sardine. Hard work, smelly (but you got used to it) and very long days / nights. Some hairy times. One in particular when 8 crew members of one of the catchers (Zuiderster 8, I believe) were shot and killed by the Polisario (terrorists). She was, eventually, demobed and sent to Chile where where she was used as a shore based factory vessel. MWP
Anyone on the site worked on her?

Binnacle
6th March 2008, 21:34
Sailed with Salvesons,met quite a few ex whalers,Jake Nesbit was on dk

Seamen don't come much better than Jake Nesbit. Trained with him in 45. Last sailed together when he was bosun of Carchester. Believe he died at sea. RIP Jake.

The Admiral
10th March 2008, 00:05
f THas any one ever sailed on a Whaling ship??. One time back in the 50s I was sent down by the Shipping Pool to one named the 'Northern Star or Cross" (I have forgotten the exact name,) its one I like to forget,she was berthed in Avonmouth and as I approached her gangway I got a whiff of this awful stench,almost made me upchuck, one of the dockers nearby said the smell was worst on board. I went back to the Pool and said they didn't need anyone. She had a large opening in the stern to pull the whales in to cut them up. I never did meet anyone that sailed on one. (EEK)
f

The Admiral
10th March 2008, 00:18
I did three trips whaling 1952-1955.with United Whalers,MT.BISCOE.and MT.POWELL.Hector Whaling.I would be pleased to hear from anyone that sailed on these ships,or knows anyone that did.and would be willing to share their photos with me.

The Admiral
12th March 2008, 11:32
THE ADMIRAL.Reading Mr Hughes note remindrd me of an incident on my very first trip.I was on the Biscoe on the gulf to Argentine run when heading west 400-500 mls off the Cape we saw the Powell wallowing in heavy seas with the camshaft-chain broken.Another job in there for the poor unfortunate engineers .when it broke I beleiye the sec was very lucky it did not hit him .We all felt sorry for those who had this job to do in such conditions.

Awil
13th November 2008, 21:19
THE ADMIRAL.Reading Mr Hughes note remindrd me of an incident on my very first trip.I was on the Biscoe on the gulf to Argentine run when heading west 400-500 mls off the Cape we saw the Powell wallowing in heavy seas with the camshaft-chain broken.Another job in there for the poor unfortunate engineers .when it broke I beleiye the sec was very lucky it did not hit him .We all felt sorry for those who had this job to do in such conditions.
I well remember this meeting our OM asked if they wanted a tow, reply is not recorded. Tony wilkinson

Tony D
13th November 2008, 21:41
I remember the Southern Harvester in the Tyne in the early sixties,we were tied up outside her at Swans,we had to store ship by climbing over her and down onto our deck,I recall she was a long way out of the water and the plank at about 45 degrees and clambering up that with half a pig over my shoulder was killing for a wee lad like me,I recall I slept that night no problem,and you are right, she stank like a banshee,the Whaling factory ships had a bad name then so I would not have fancied sailing on her.
(EEK)

Awil
6th December 2008, 18:37
Hello Admiral, you must have been on Biscoe at the same time as I was. Tony Wilkinson

coronatus242
22nd February 2009, 17:08
Does anyone have any images of the soviet whaling fleet?
I would most especially like to see some pics of Slava.
Thanks

R58484956
22nd February 2009, 17:52
Greetings Coronatus and welcome to SN. Bon voyage.

coronatus242
22nd February 2009, 19:08
Thanks very much... I feel welcome already!

Normski
27th June 2009, 17:27
My father worked for many years on the whaling factory ships Southern Harvester and Southern Venturer. My first memory was my Dad taking me to the top of the Engine room, when the door opened and we entered the combination of the heat and smell of oil hit me -it made me ill. Unfortunately the Chief Engineer was directly below me - got covered in it. I don't remember that part particularly but it was a tale my Dad told me years later - apparently the Chief gave him hell for it for a few weeks before they "settled things" in their own manner.

Funnily enough I turned out to be kind of an engineer myself after my apprenticeship at Middle Docks.

The smell of the ship still lingers in my memory, and my Dad, when he came home used to stink the house out. Being home 6 months out of every 24 was hard on my Mam more than me - because to my eyes he was someone who came home for half a year out of every two, always bringing fabulous presents for me. but that's kids for you I suppose.

jg grant
28th June 2009, 00:52
I was on the Southern Satellite 1958/9. Joined her in the Gareloch. Captain William Spence. I can't believe I only took a half dozen or so pictures while doon the ice. Does anyone have any pictures of the Satellite? I have a couple taken on board but it could be any ship. Regards Ronnie

clarke
22nd December 2009, 08:13
Im trying to find people who knew my father his name was Ronald ( Nobby) Clarke he sailed on the Southern Venturer season 1952-53
he was employed as a Deck Galleyboy and was 20 years old.

My father died in 1962 aged 30yo,

I'd love to hear from anyone who sailed with him and would love to see any photos taken during his trip
My father was English about 5ft 10 tall, when he passed on he had receeding hair and wore glasses so may of been the same in 1952

Id appreciate any help in locating old friends of his and links to other web sites that maybe able to help.

Blackal
22nd December 2009, 08:26
I have a few photos and documentation from the Salvesens' fleet between '50 and '53 in my gallery. My father was an engineer, so any group photos would be predominently from that department. I'm not sure exactly what the complement of the factory ships was - but looking at the photos - there were a lot onboard.

Al :)

slick
23rd December 2009, 07:50
All,
When I was down South after the Falklands War and ashore in South Georgia amongst the detritus of the Whaling Station I took a souvenir or two, one of which is a Library Book which is marked on the cover Fl/K "SEVILLA".
Any more details of the aforementioned ship, what does Fl/K translate as?


Yours aye,

slick

Wendy Owen
18th June 2010, 20:57
I receive messages via MarinersRootsweb and one in particular has taken my eye, so being "local" to Hull I will post on here.


http://www.hull.ac.uk/mhsc/FarHorizons/Documents/TheIsabellaandCaptainRoss.pdf

One Hull whaler, the Isabella, had a remarkable relationship with Captain, later Sir John Ross. The Isabella was chartered by the Admiralty as the flag ship for an expedition in search of the North West Passage in 1818. Captain Ross commanded the Isabella whilst his subordinate, William Parry, took charge of the consort vessel, the Alexander. Ross's mission was to take his ships round the extreme northeast coast of America and through to the Bering Straits, in other words he was to find his way through the legendary Northwest Passage.

further read.....

In August 1833 they finally made it through the ice. Exhausted by weeks of rowing they were resting in tents on the beach by a small river to the east of Navy Board Inlet when they spotted a sail, but on putting to sea in pursuit, they failed to make contact. This ship later turned out to be the Hull whaler, William Lee. Hope had turned to despair, and then suddenly another sail was seen. Against all odds it turned out to be Ross's old flagship the Isabella. The whaler hove to and the mate set off in command of a boat to investigate but, on approaching the survivors, he took some convincing that the gaunt, grim bearded man who hailed him was in fact Captain Ross, who had been given up for dead for more than two years.

Suggest you read this Pdf

Wendy

5lighthouse
14th October 2010, 23:42
My father was an engineer and ultimately superintendent for Salvesens catchers in the 50s. I've now inherited his photo album (I believe he had pics published in National Geographic at the time), scrimshawed whales' teeth, Sperm whale's eardrum (EEK) , Whale oil production figures for years 57/58/59, the annual refit lists for the catchers and all manner of things that he kept all these years.

I believe there was a converted catcher in Aberdeen harbour this week(Ocean Swift - ex Whaler-65, built 1957 in Netherlands) that drew a fair bit of interest.

Al (Thumb)

Hi Al,

I've only just joined. I joined because your post came up in a search I was doing to find any old pics of this mighty vessel as she was many years ago (Pre "Havila Sky."). I lost the ones I used to have when a previous laptop died. The only photos I have are attached. Beautiful isn't she?
Any help on this would be most appreciated. Sister ships included.

"Ocean Swift" was previously:-
"65" - "R5"(I think.) - "Andenes" - "Rescue Kim" - "Kim" - "Havila Sky" and now "Ocean Swift."

Hope this is helpful to someone.

Mick Whiting
16th September 2011, 21:41
As an engineer,I sailed on a whale factory ship called the Willem Barendz, it had been converted to process pilchards into fish meal for fertiliser. We used to operate off the coast of Mauritania, Western Sahara, and the Canary Islands. The smell was pretty revolting, but one got used to it after awhile.

(Night)

Freo

freo,,was she called the "interpeche" or "L,interpeche" ,,i was on them both on the same run,,2 x 6 month contracts off mauritania, worked just off the 100 fathom line about 30 mile off.. nouadibou.

alan ward
23rd October 2011, 15:22
Here we go ! Unfortunately for the whale, the Japanese eat them. To get around the ban on catching whales for this purpose, they have to resort to other means. We only ate whalemeat during WW2 when we could get it. I ate it when I was with Salvasen on the Southern Harvester and it was not too bad.
I wonder how many of us will be going over to France for a holiday. Will there be protests on the force-feeding of geese for fois gras? Have any of you guys ever heard a lobster being boiled alive ? we can all meet outside Gordon Ramsay's restaurant.
How about not eating Mr. Matthew's turkey or battery chicken ?
I don't like the idea of harpooning animals and their subsequent death, but I occasionally ( if I'm lucky ) catch a trout on a hook, play it until it is exhausted, reel it in and then batter it on the head with a weighted bar to kill it, I then take it home and eat it. Am I any worse ?

fred.

" go ahead punk..make my day "

I shoot a bit as well,i`ve never shot a whale but I`d love to see my lab retrieve one.

geirrosset
3rd March 2012, 12:05
All,
When I was down South after the Falklands War and ashore in South Georgia amongst the detritus of the Whaling Station I took a souvenir or two, one of which is a Library Book which is marked on the cover Fl/K "SEVILLA".
Any more details of the aforementioned ship, what does Fl/K translate as?


Yours aye,

slick

Fl/k translates loosely to "Floating cookery". So it was a factory ship.
Steamer. Built in 1900. 7002 tonnes. Converted to floating factory for Salvesen in 1922. Sold to company Sevilla in 1929 with four catchers. Sold to Polhavet 1930. Sold back to Salvesen 1933. Used as Transporter/Tanker. 1946 scrapped in Belgium.

Geir

Andrew Craig-Bennett
3rd March 2012, 18:34
One who was on the Salvesens factories told me they refuelled at sea from a tanker which then cleaned, loaded whale oil and returned. Cleaning from fuel oil to whale oil at sea is not a job I would fancy.

Cisco
3rd March 2012, 19:10
Hector Hawk, one of Hector Whaling's last two ships, was set up for that although she never went south. Not as bad as it sounds.... 10C was used for bunkers... the rest of the tanks would receive the whale oil.

grbosse
31st January 2014, 20:21
Anyone sailed on the Cruz del Sur whale factory ship after she was laid up in Mobile, Alabama in '68 and was supposed to be hauled to the far east to be cut up and converted into 3 barges? I was the sparks from July -68 to November -68.

Michael Cook
11th March 2014, 10:33
There was a Southern Harvester, a whale factory ship of 15364 tons, registered in Leith and owned by South Georgia co ltd ( Chris Salveson co)

All of Salvesens ships were prefixed by Southern Hope this helps

geirrosset
11th March 2014, 13:41
Addendum to Mr. Cook's post. Salvesen's (South Georgia Company) use of the prefix "Southern" stemmed from the early days of Southern Whaling and Sealing Co. (South African Irvin & Johnson), who operated the factory ships "Southern Empress" and "Southern Princess" as well as assorted similarly named catchers. This company was acquired by Salvesen in 1941, and they took over the "Southern" naming convention. Before this, Salvesen (whaling) ships had names often beginning with S and almost always ending with an A. Rather strange names too like Sorsra, Sondra, Sigfra, Sorka, Busta, Foula ... In the early Iceland, Pharoe Island and Shetland whaling days the names were a bit more varied, like Arctic, Immanuel, Thor, Isafold ...



Geir Rosset

Oslo

Norway

marinescenes
28th March 2014, 20:33
fl.k stands for in Norwegian floating kokerie or whale factory ship in English regarding your visit to South Georgia the book you mention from the vessel named New Sevilla was a Salvesen Whale factory ship.I find thisstrange as I am looking at a book you mention that I picked up from the billet named Trehus in November 1991 when visiting the island in my possession See www. marinescenes for whaling ships

TIM HUDSON
28th March 2014, 21:16
I sailed with a mate in 1970s who worked on Southern Venturer and Harvester. WRD McLaughlin from Aberdeen way. He had published several books on Antartic whaling including some novels. Try 'Call of the South - The Story of British Whaling in Antartica'.....its still available at Amazon etc. Good read.
Tim