Orari

geoff smith 1932
30th June 2008, 18:24
I wonder if anyone remembers "Orari"?
Regards Geoff.

R58484956
30th June 2008, 19:44
MV Orari, 10153 tons , built 1931 by Alexander Stephens & Co; Glasgow.
471.0 x 67.3 x 36.8. Two Sulzer diesels 9 cylinder 2S CSA, 26 3/4" X 47 1/4"
2 double ended boilers at 100psi. DF,ESD, Radar. 2decks 3rd deck in forward holds. Cruiser stern. Code flags GJKX. O/No; 162906. Registered Plymouth. British flag. Owned by NZ shipping Company.

Hugh Ferguson
30th June 2008, 20:09
One of my old pilot colleagues was a Harry Lee. He was either 2nd or 3rd mate in the Orari in the Malta convoy code-named, Harpoon, June 1942. The Blue Funnel, Troilus and the Orari were the only ships of that convoy which succeeded in making it to Malta. Harry died quite some years ago. If you knew him and would wish to know the date I could probably find it for you.

ian d.cameron
30th June 2008, 20:14
Some more info
http://www.clydesite.co.uk/clydebuilt/viewship.asp?id=3605
http://www.uboat.net/allies/merchants/717.html

Mike S
1st July 2008, 01:43
Ah yes.......Orari.......
My Grandfather (Capt. J.G. "Nutty" Almond) was C/O on her in her early days and in fact I seem to recall he was promoted Master in NZS while he was there.
Wonderful old ship however she never really recovered from that belting she got in the war. She survived the torpedo attack and arrived in the Clyde with an aft draft of 39 feet!
The near misses in the Malta convoy attacks took their toll too and by the time the H boats were coming on line in the late forties the poor old girl was not too well and not worth fixing up.
Grandpa always had a very soft spot for her and was there for a while.
I have just noticed that they claim she was scrapped in 1971! I have to be honest I thought she was sold from fleet in the early fifties......that would make her 40 years old when scrapped!

spongebob
1st July 2008, 05:53
I can remember Orari visiting Auckland during the late 40's and early 50's.
An old friend of mine, Jim Donn, served on her as an engineer before joining Ben Line during the 50's. I seem to remember that her Sulzer engines had reached a stage where she was a real work house below.

alex page
3rd July 2008, 03:48
Great ship the Orari for parties .She had a fire onboard in Cairns or Bowen next days paper had front page picture of hoses everywhere and booted and spurred officers escorting party goers aboard . A large rocket was soon incoming from Leadenhall St.
Alex

geoff smith 1932
3rd July 2008, 17:49
The engine room fire took place in Townsville.I was Senior Elec and was present at both events (Fire and "Social Evening").My Boots and Spurs have never been the same!
Regards Geoff.

JET
10th July 2008, 09:50
NZS disposed of her in 1958, she was renamed Capo Bianco and was scrapped in 1971. The Sulzer engines were well past their prime in 1956 and by that time I can confirm that she was a workhouse.

Regards John

roygretn
1st September 2011, 11:01
I remember the Orari well.
I was signed on for a trip Wellington - London November 1947, on her way back to UK for a major refit. We had a deck cargo of live sheep for Montevideo so sailed via Cape Horn. We were lucky to survive the South Pacific seas with only one engine to maintain steerage while the engineers struggled to get the failed engine restarted. Is there anyone out there who shared that voyage ?
roygretn

Hugh Ferguson
1st September 2011, 16:56
The best photo I can find of the N.Z.S. Orari arrived in Malta. The port list was caused by her having struck a mine entering Valetta Harbour

roygretn
2nd September 2011, 01:12
To Hugh Ferguson
Thank you for the photo of NZS Orari. I was describing my voyage on her to my son & realised I had very little information on her apart from my memories of 64y ago, which are still quite vivid. I was on my way to UK to study at Imperial College, University of London and thanks to NZ Shipping Co managed to work my passage, replacing a crew member who had jumped ship in NZ. I recall she looked rather better by 1947 than after her wartime experiences, but was certainly still in need of a major overhaul.
roygretn

Hugh Ferguson
2nd September 2011, 16:37
A graphic account of Operation Harpoon appears in the book, Ordeal By Sea, written by Sydney D. Waters. The following is an excerpt describing the arrival of the two survivors of the original six ships, the Troilus and the Orari, sailing from Gibraltar.

'It was past midnight when the two survivors of the original convoy arrived in harbour, but the people of Malta had not gone to bed. They crowded on the ramparts, wildly cheering the ships. The crews of the Orari and Troilus, had a hasty meal, rigged the derricks and before daybreak the badly needed cargoes were being unloaded. During the morning, Lord Gort, Commander-in Chief-of-Malta, called on board of the Orari and Troilus and congratulated the ships' companies on their performance. It was, perhaps for the civilian population, Malta's darkest hour. It is related that Sir Edward Jackson, the Lieutenant Governor, broadcast to the island what further deprivations and sacrifices awaited them. When darkness came they gathered round his house with accordians and guitars and serenaded him; then they went back to their tunnels and tightened their belts once more----------------------------During the fifty four days the Orari remained in Malta there were 289 heavy air attacks----------'

It was to be another two months before the five survivors of the epic Pedestal Convoy of August 1942 arrived in Malta.

Hugh Ferguson
6th September 2011, 18:52
The best photo I can find of the N.Z.S. Orari arrived in Malta. The port list was caused by her having struck a mine entering Valetta Harbour

The Troilus, the other survivor of Operation Harpoon

Hugh Ferguson
7th September 2011, 12:32
The Troilus, the other survivor of Operation Harpoon

Note the barrel lashed to the very top of the foremast. This was a feature aboard Blue Funnel ships during the war. The purpose was for a ship proceeding independently to send aloft, at sundown and sunrise, a special lookout who would be able to see, as far as the eye could see, any U. boat that may have been stalking the ship.
This duty was reserved especially for the two senior middies.
Does anyone recall if any other company did likewise?

alex page
9th September 2011, 04:01
In the picture of the orari in malta what was the addition to the bow for ?
Alex

Hugh Ferguson
9th September 2011, 09:01
In the picture of the orari in malta what was the addition to the bow for ?
Alex

It was called a 'paravane' and was deployed in many ships at that time as a counter measure to mines. It was intended to snag the wire to which a mine was attached, cut it and so prevent the ship striking the mine and causing it to explode.

Hugh Ferguson
9th September 2011, 10:04
In the picture of the orari in malta what was the addition to the bow for ?
Alex

This thumbnail shows a very unusual event involving a 'paravane' snagging the propellor of a torpedo. The ship was the Commodore ship Port Chalmers in the epic Pedestal Convoy to Malta, Aug. 1942.
In order to clear this the ship had to be stopped and given a bit of sternway which then enabled the paravane wire to be cut. No sooner had this been done when the torpedo exploded but now far enough away not to cause any damage to the ship.
Lucky Port Chalmers!!!

BelliniTosi
9th September 2011, 11:50
It was called a 'paravane' and was deployed in many ships at that time as a counter measure to mines. It was intended to snag the wire to which a mine was attached, cut it and so prevent the ship striking the mine and causing it to explode.


This is how paravanes are deployed and in theory, because they are streamed from the bow they will stop any moored mines from hitting the hull

Russbeau
19th September 2013, 09:12
NZS disposed of her in 1958, she was renamed Capo Bianco and was scrapped in 1971. The Sulzer engines were well past their prime in 1956 and by that time I can confirm that she was a workhouse.

Regards John
Spot on John it was in Falmouth she changed hands, I believe The Italians bought her. I was working by on the Suffolk at the time and was told they had great difficulty starting the engines.........Seems the old girl just didn't want to go.