What is a GP3?

Shiny
2nd July 2008, 19:40
I thought this from Fleet News circa 1979 might be enjoyed by others.
With thanks to Col Robinson who sent it to me
Shiny

PS Hope the attachment works...computers aren't my thing, but give me a chipping hammer...

R58484956
3rd July 2008, 19:22
In the engine room "painting OVER the grease nipples" not a recommended practice unless you want a seizure.

PS. A GP3 is a low cost very versatile interface that connects your PC to the outside analogue and digital world.

twogrumpy
4th July 2008, 16:29
A GP3 is a GP2 with his head kicked in.
twogrumpy

Shiny
5th July 2008, 09:22
A GP3 is a GP2 with his head kicked in.
twogrumpy

Eh? I don't get it, is it GP2s you don't like or GP3s?

twogrumpy
5th July 2008, 16:23
Not really keen on either, the old system was superior.
twogrumpy

Shiny
5th July 2008, 19:12
Your misanthropic moniker gives you away: you must have been a joy to be with on those long trips.
Did you resort to violence often?

twogrumpy
6th July 2008, 16:21
Had low tolerance for non technical personnel, and an old fashioned attitude towards subordinates, how does that grab you??
twogrumpy

Broady
10th July 2008, 09:06
As the clip says he is a junior seaman and when you have your sea time in the you are promoted to GP2.I enjoyed my time at sea and found it interesting working deck and engine room.Tony

Shiny
21st July 2008, 18:16
Had low tolerance for non technical personnel, and an old fashioned attitude towards subordinates, how does that grab you??
twogrumpy

Those engaged in manual labour can be so tiresome eh?

Still, don't suppose you got in the crew bar much with that attitude - unless they wanted a leckie to change a light bulb or put a plug on something.

methc
21st July 2008, 19:03
Twogrumpy,
You're a man of old fashioned values but they worked especially on ships where the young seamen were taught to call officers "pigs".Never heard that before. In my day Mates were either lousy bs who didn't let you get away with anything or silly bs who did . You must have learned your attitude in one of Lyles tramps.
Having gone to Jamaica for Bunkers the pilot took us to a harbour anchorage to search for stowaways. The Mate saw some hiding under the fresh water tank in No.3 tween deck. He got them out by playing a steam hose at them!
Drunken discordant or argumentative seamen were washed along the decks by a fire hose at full pressure. I kid you not!!

twogrumpy
21st July 2008, 19:33
Those engaged in manual labour can be so tiresome eh?

Still, don't suppose you got in the crew bar much with that attitude - unless they wanted a leckie to change a light bulb or put a plug on something.
Did not do social nights, did not want the crew in the officers bar, and never went in the crew bar, is that plain enough for you.
In addition, if I did not like the goings on in the officers bar, would not bother going in there either, all down to personal choice and how you choose to live.
twogrumpy(Cloud)

Shiny
21st July 2008, 19:52
and ..."drunken discordant or argumentative" officers were...?
Oh, yeah I remember they were...in charge.

arfabuck
12th December 2008, 10:53
Twogrumpy,
Drunken discordant or argumentative seamen were washed along the decks by a fire hose at full pressure. I kid you not!!

Had a similar experience on my last ship,- the Willow? Only all aft ship I sailed on. We had a Irish crew, . Standard procedure was as OOW, if any crew returned from shore- leave at the least bit inebriated, they were knocked unconscious and slung on their bunks to sleep it off. Obvious sign came in 3 sorts, singing and friend of the world, or pissed and looking for a fight, or out of their tree and maudlin. Any of these signs and the bar came down. Sounds drastic but by the time this came into effect they had completely demolished all their cabin doors and most of the furniture, they weren't house trained and cr....d in the corridors etc. etc.

The final straw was that we had been out for over a year and the Company promised to have us back in the UK by Xmas, and this was early December. After discharge in Dunedin- a 3 day bastard and Harry Tate had not got any sleep during that time, we were anchored out in the roads waiting for papers. I was 3/O on the bridge on watch and heard this screaming below so went to investigate. Two of us managed to rugby tackle a drunk seaman just as he was swinging a fire axe down on the mates head - who was crashed on his bunk.

We stopped off at Wellington to drop this bugger ashore and expected to be flown home. No such luck, Abadan F.O. and finally got home in Feb via Dubai and Dan Air.

The only one who got home for Xmas was the seaman - who got a reprimand from his union and couldn't sign on another ship for 3 months.

Bye bye BP Tanker Co. Ltd.

Art

stewart4866
12th December 2008, 17:38
Did not do social nights, did not want the crew in the officers bar, and never went in the crew bar, is that plain enough for you.
In addition, if I did not like the goings on in the officers bar, would not bother going in there either, all down to personal choice and how you choose to live.
twogrumpy(Cloud)

What changed you twogrumpy never like that when I sailed with you. stewart(Thumb)

twogrumpy
12th December 2008, 19:11
What changed you twogrumpy never like that when I sailed with you. stewart(Thumb)

Young and impressionable when I was with you Stewart, then found out that one had to be strong to survive.
(Cloud)

kevjacko
16th December 2008, 12:17
Just reading through this thread takes me right back to the divisions that used to make me laugh in my day's with BP. Twogrumpy you really need to give yourself a nip. Times have changed and the worlds moved on. As a chief cook I suppose I could be called non - technical personnel. However since coming ashore I have diversified retrained, qualified and work as a technician installing medical equipment. (does this make me good enough for you to talk to). I was proud to be a chief cook at a relatively young age and anyway it's each to his or her own. A chief steward I sailed with once said to me. You can train a monkey to go down the engine room and press a sequence of buttons, the same monkey can be trained to swab the decks, but someone's got to be there to feed the monkey. I add to this thread tongue firmly in cheek not wishing to cause offence to anyone. My view always was that ' everyone was in the same tub, heading in the same direction, therefore civility, politeness and respect for all and their function on board that ship made life a lot more dammned pleasent all round'. There's no such thing as a superior corpse in the graveyard and I fail to see how adopting an 'I'm it your ****' attitude contributes effectively in this day and age.

sherloc
16th December 2008, 14:02
I wondered how long it would take for the "them and us" to come out on this site, thats if it has't already. I've missed it if it has. Just for the record Mr Twogrumpy, sir, the crew were quite happy in their own bar thank you. The officers pig was much to stuffy and boring ! Sherloc.

Broady
16th December 2008, 14:44
Oh no now wait for the flak to come your way,but well said kevjacko and sherloc you both hit the nail on the head but in other posts they even have a go at each other (deck vs engineers) so on most ships there was a 3 way split.

twogrumpy
17th December 2008, 10:07
Just for the record Mr Twogrumpy, sir, the crew were quite happy in their own bar thank you. The officers pig was much to stuffy and boring ! Sherloc.

Would not agree on the stuffy and boring, but then again we were reasonably well behaved with not that many punch ups.
I recall an instance where one of the PO's had his wife on board, they had to ask if the wife could drink in the officers bar, as the "troops" in the crews bar made it so uncomfortable for her, clearly she did not find us overly "stuffy"
Would say that on the whole saw more trouble in the crew bar over the years so very glad you were happy there, quite clearly you felt at home.
(Cloud)

David W
17th December 2008, 10:37
Had low tolerance for non technical personnel, and an old fashioned attitude towards subordinates, how does that grab you??
twogrumpy

Kevjacko, Sherloc, Broady, stop it at once, or you will be made to sit on the naughty focsle with the millions of other subordinates poor old Grumpy has discovered since becoming strong after being young and foolish.

Jacko I agree with you "we were all in the same boat", but its a pity there were a few who thought they were entitled to water ski while the others manned the oars.

twogrumpy
17th December 2008, 11:03
but its a pity there were a few who thought they were entitled to water ski while the others manned the oars.

Correct, quite enjoy a good water ski, row faster galley slaves...
Oh, and the word was impressionable, believed there was good in all, soon discovered otherwise.
(Cloud)

stewart4866
17th December 2008, 11:06
What happened to all the christmas spirit must be still in the bottle, come on chaps lighten up. cheers stewart

David W
17th December 2008, 11:52
Sorry being non technical I pressed the wrong button

David W
17th December 2008, 12:05
What happened to all the christmas spirit must be still in the bottle, come on chaps lighten up. cheers stewart


The Christmas spirit is in full flow Stewart, under the skis of old grumpy, who I do believe is enjoying himself, and will continue to do so until us non technical people, mistakenly, connect the lecky cable to the wire tow rope and he becomes the glow[er]ing light of our Christmas decorations. Ah well back to the tabnabs

Broady
17th December 2008, 12:29
Would not agree on the stuffy and boring, but then again we were reasonably well behaved with not that many punch ups.
I recall an instance where one of the PO's had his wife on board, they had to ask if the wife could drink in the officers bar, as the "troops" in the crews bar made it so uncomfortable for her, clearly she did not find us overly "stuffy"
Would say that on the whole saw more trouble in the crew bar over the years so very glad you were happy there, quite clearly you felt at home.
(Cloud)

Then I must count myself lucky because I never came across punch ups in the crew bar and as for taking your wives well it should never had been allowed nothing but trouble,some seem to think they had joined a cruise ship not a tanker but hey thats another story.

twogrumpy
18th December 2008, 19:08
The Christmas spirit is in full flow Stewart, under the skis of old grumpy, who I do believe is enjoying himself, and will continue to do so until us non technical people, mistakenly, connect the lecky cable to the wire tow rope and he becomes the glow[er]ing light of our Christmas decorations. Ah well back to the tabnabs

Clearly I must bow to your in depth knowledge of life at sea, gained over your many years ploughing the oceans of the world as a highly experienced seafarer.
(Cloud)

Sarky Cut
18th December 2008, 21:05
I am surprised that our headmaster Marcroni Wallau has allowed this to go on so long.
I spent many years in the employ of BP tankers and for the most part found the catering abysmal compared with two other companies I sailed with. The Catering Officers acted as passengers with the masters ear who did little to check on the accomodation and the job that they were paid for. Many were never seen in the Officers Bar or even dining in the Officers Saloon.

The crews were of two types, they were good or would have fitted into Croxteth perfectly.

I could take or leave the officers bar, many of the members were good engineers and drivers who were professional in their spheres, I know many people like that in real life but I would not want to socialise with them.

It was a case of live and let live as far as I was concerned but I objected to being told when and how I should or should not spend my leasure time by ingnorant oiks who thought that because they had a bit of paper saying they could fit metal or shot holes in the sun, could tell me whether I could drink or read a book or attend films.

As long as I performed my tasks and duties and was always prepared to do my bit I did not see that it was the remit of somebody else to tell me how to use my off duty hours.

Funny its still the same now having retired after 37 years at sea in constant and rewarding employment on various vessels and trades routes.

BP Tankers was the most professional but was full of pretentious types who were forever timedating their life with before,after or during getting my ticket.

I spent the last 16 years of my career on CC ferries and the staff there did their jobs well without referring to their qualifications as most of them had them all anyway but then there were no young men on the ferries and many of the junior staff had either Masters or Chiefs Certificates gained deep sea and had become disallusioned or were in my case made redundant.

I can see where Twogrumpy is coming from and all this vitriol; that is being aimed at him is from people who have never been officers or were junior staff who could always ask for advice from a senior watchkeeper.

Its horses for courses, I stayed because I liked the life of a different place every day and was strong enough to avoid the twin pitfalls of drugs and drunkeness that afflicted so many young men at sea in those days and the advances of preditory men from a certain department.

It has all changed now, the Royal Navy has changed, life in general has changed even ashore everybody is working longer and harder.

We had it relatively soft and were well paid and there was much time to kill.

Some people can handle idleness, I am one of those people who could do my job with the ease of knowing that I had been well trained and was experienced enough to do it without flapping, running around trying to impress the senior officers.

Its hard to be perfect but what can you do?

David W
19th December 2008, 09:51
Clearly I must bow to your in depth knowledge of life at sea, gained over your many years ploughing the oceans of the world as a highly experienced seafarer.
(Cloud)

Dear old Grumpy just when I thought some of your stuff was written tongue in cheek, you go and prove me wrong, and you really do believe that you are superior to everyone else.

By the way how long does it take to become a highly experienced seafarer ?,
and what does it matter, as I thought this site was for anyone and everyone with an interest in things maritime, and at least my profile is there to be seen

Sarky, have you ever been to Croxteth ?, and just as a matter of interest, I do believe the Catering Department came in handy sometimes, even if it was only to show some people what knife and fork to use and not to wipe their nose on the napkin. From a "brew in a can" to "silver service", a giant step for mankind.

Sarky Cut
19th December 2008, 10:44
Lighten up David W, we spent more time as an apprentice learning a worthwhile skill/trade than you did at sea, as for learning about how to use a knife and fork I learned that with my mothers milk!

As for noses that is what overall sleeves were made for.

As for your question about Croxteth, no I have not been there but I have been reading and watching the news about someone who used to.


Some are born to rule others serve, it is no disrespect to the the catering department but to see some of the pan bashers on the TV and their pretentious antics is it any wonder the catering department used to get some stick?

And photographers.

(Big fishing rod smiley)

David W
19th December 2008, 11:30
Lighten up David W, we spent more time as an apprentice learning a worthwhile skill/trade than you did at sea, as for learning about how to use a knife and fork I learned that with my mothers milk!

As for noses that is what overall sleeves were made for.

As for your question about Croxteth, no I have not been there but I have been reading and watching the news about someone who used to.


Some are born to rule others serve, it is no disrespect to the the catering department but to see some of the pan bashers on the TV and their pretentious antics is it any wonder the catering department used to get some stick?

And photographers.

(Big fishing rod smiley)

Morning sarky,
Its always a pleasure to have a conversation with someone using wits lowest form,
Length of time at sea ?, maybe the grass was greener somewhere else, it was certainly more lucrative, but surely the time at sea doesnt count as much as the wonderful companions it was spent with.
Learning things with your mothers milk, is that why the dummy is thrown out of the pram so often.
A worthwile skill/trade !! with so many ships going UMS.
The expression "can lad" also comes to mind.
Most of the overalls I saw had no sleeves, so silver sleeves must have been silver arms.
Pan bashers on TV !, dont you wish you were making their money ?
Croxteth, I dont believe you are really naive enough to believe everything you read in the papers, if you do, I am sorry to tell you Father Christmas doesnt really exist.
Angling, a worm at one end and a ?? at the other.
Some are born to rule others serve ??, some are born to eat fillet steak others get gristle.

(==D) A massive camera flash light smiley of me light[en]ing up.(==D)

PS almost forgot, how does "BP Tankers was the most professional but was full of pretentious types who were forever timedating their life with before,after or during getting my ticket." not equate to "we spent more time as an apprentice learning a worthwhile skill/trade than you did at sea"

Sarky Cut
19th December 2008, 12:06
Some things David you will never learn and one of those is you are acting like a complete pratt not only on this thread but on many of the others you have been on.

You are ill informed about life at sea as you are about real life.

Your signature says it all about you just as my name says it about me.

The difference is I have done it, been there, seen it, got the tee shirt, all you have done is peel potatoes take pictures and talk tripe.

I am living a comfortable retirement in a nice home earned by honest work and toil.

I dont need to fill my resume in, when you are the Jones's you dont have to keep up with them!

Have a nice day.

dom
19th December 2008, 12:11
I am surprised that our headmaster Marcroni Wallau has allowed this to go on so long.
I spent many years in the employ of BP tankers and for the most part found the catering abysmal compared with two other companies I sailed with. The Catering Officers acted as passengers with the masters ear who did little to check on the accomodation and the job that they were paid for. Many were never seen in the Officers Bar or even dining in the Officers Saloon.

The crews were of two types, they were good or would have fitted into Croxteth perfectly.

I could take or leave the officers bar, many of the members were good engineers and drivers who were professional in their spheres, I know many people like that in real life but I would not want to socialise with them.

It was a case of live and let live as far as I was concerned but I objected to being told when and how I should or should not spend my leasure time by ingnorant oiks who thought that because they had a bit of paper saying they could fit metal or shot holes in the sun, could tell me whether I could drink or read a book or attend films.

As long as I performed my tasks and duties and was always prepared to do my bit I did not see that it was the remit of somebody else to tell me how to use my off duty hours.

Funny its still the same now having retired after 37 years at sea in constant and rewarding employment on various vessels and trades routes.

BP Tankers was the most professional but was full of pretentious types who were forever timedating their life with before,after or during getting my ticket.

I spent the last 16 years of my career on CC ferries and the staff there did their jobs well without referring to their qualifications as most of them had them all anyway but then there were no young men on the ferries and many of the junior staff had either Masters or Chiefs Certificates gained deep sea and had become disallusioned or were in my case made redundant.

I can see where Twogrumpy is coming from and all this vitriol; that is being aimed at him is from people who have never been officers or were junior staff who could always ask for advice from a senior watchkeeper.

Its horses for courses, I stayed because I liked the life of a different place every day and was strong enough to avoid the twin pitfalls of drugs and drunkeness that afflicted so many young men at sea in those days and the advances of preditory men from a certain department.

It has all changed now, the Royal Navy has changed, life in general has changed even ashore everybody is working longer and harder.

We had it relatively soft and were well paid and there was much time to kill.

Some people can handle idleness, I am one of those people who could do my job with the ease of knowing that I had been well trained and was experienced enough to do it without flapping, running around trying to impress the senior officers.

Its hard to be perfect but what can you do?

pat yourself on the back

David W
19th December 2008, 12:30
Some things David you will never learn and one of those is you are acting like a complete pratt not only on this thread but on many of the others you have been on.

You are ill informed about life at sea as you are about real life.

Your signature says it all about you just as my name says it about me.

The difference is I have done it, been there, seen it, got the tee shirt, all you have done is peel potatoes take pictures and talk tripe.

I am living a comfortable retirement in a nice home earned by honest work and toil.

I dont need to fill my resume in, when you are the Jones's you dont have to keep up with them!

Have a nice day.

Morning again sarky,
All the things say say may well be true , but you cant prove it, it is your opinion and you are more than welcome to it. I must say I am very disappointed in you, you have slipped from sarcasm to outright personal attack, and that doesnt equate to answers to the questions posed, especially the last one.
By the way can I count 25 cruises, all over the world, in the last 10 years, as sea time ??

Pratting about having a nice day.(==D)

ROBERT HENDERSON
19th December 2008, 13:24
Pardon me if my memory is fading with old age, I thought this thread was requesting the explanation of a GP3, not for school children throwing insults at each other.

Regards Robert

Sarky Cut
19th December 2008, 13:50
Pardon me if my memory is fading with old age, I thought this thread was requesting the explanation of a GP3, not for school children throwing insults at each other.

Regards Robert

You are quite right of course, I would say it was the lowest rank in the General Purpose crewing list, old style "deckboy" or "engineroom boy".

Broady
19th December 2008, 13:51
YES but he started it SIR!!!![=P]

David W
19th December 2008, 14:31
Pardon me if my memory is fading with old age, I thought this thread was requesting the explanation of a GP3, not for school children throwing insults at each other.

Regards Robert
Absolutely correct Robert , but if you look at posts 3 & 7, and I wont mention 31, you may get an inkling of why some of us non "highly experienced seafarers" have misplaced the steering "thingy", let go the stringy bits and are no doubt heading towards the Moderator Reefs, and the final ignomy of being grounded.
But as they say in all the best galleys "If you cant take it, dont dish it out"(==D)

Broady
19th December 2008, 14:46
All this from a simple question.

Sarky Cut
19th December 2008, 14:54
A worthwile skill/trade !! with so many ships going UMS.


This little phase shows that you have no idea of what you speak.

Who do you think controls and maintains this equipment, with maybe five years between refits and drydocks.

Highly trained dedicated people who are in it for the long term, nobody else would go through all the hard work at college and hard slog to get their qualifications.(A)

Derek Roger
19th December 2008, 15:02
Directed at nobody in particular but may fit some of the threads in this Forum .

GP3 " 3rd generation Goading Pratt "

Just so you all know we are watching this thread with some distaste .

Derek

David W
19th December 2008, 16:40
Directed at nobody in particular but may fit some of the threads in this Forum .

GP3 " 3rd generation Goading Pratt "

Just so you all know we are watching this thread with some distaste .

Derek

Good afternoon Derek,
If I am the one you are watching please say so and you wont have to ignore me, I will go away, but first I would like to say I thoroughly enjoyed my time at sea, for a 16 year old, with not the best eye sight in the world, I saw some wonderful things, had some great experiences, and met some wonderful people, in all departments, and as a Marine Superintendant, who was friend, once said, everyone is important on a ship, if the Company did not need you they wouldnt employ you. Unfortunatley there were also some absolute a...holes, who took great pleasure in abusing what little authority they had. I am the first to admit that most people on a ship held posts that were senior to mine, but, I was subordinate to no man. I couldnt stand bullsh-----g, blustering bullies then and I cant stand them now, and that is after 40 years of controlling people who didnt want to be controlled, and still earned their respect.

benjidog
19th December 2008, 18:16
The later stages of this thread reminds me of times spent with a friend whose parents lived over an Irish pub in Kilburn north London.

Often on a Friday night there would be a punch up with chairs and fists flying and someone would call the cops. The cops weren't daft - they waited until the drunks had knocked seven bells out of each other then went and picked them off the floor and arrested them.

The Mods are taking a similar approach with this thread. I hope nobody has to get carted away to the brig! :)

Is it worth it? (Hippy)

Anchorman
19th December 2008, 19:51
If any one wants to know more, contact the MCA and ask for relevant MGNs I think MGN 97 but not 100% sure.
As an additional point the seatime of a GP General Purpose rating only counts 2/3 towards a cert of competency on deck.
Regards
Neil

twogrumpy
19th December 2008, 20:11
Morning again sarky,
By the way can I count 25 cruises, all over the world, in the last 10 years, as sea time ??

Pratting about having a nice day.(==D)

So thats where you got all your seagoing experience, explains a lot.

Watch it Sarky, too many home truths posted, thought police will be on to you.
(Cloud)

spongebob
19th December 2008, 20:12
Boy am I glad that I never sailed on that ship!!

trucker
19th December 2008, 21:11
why all this argueing about the deck boy .there,s enough to go round.(A)

Andy Lavies
19th December 2008, 21:33
Officers Bar, Crew bar, Films? All we ever had was a cardboard box of books (nothing naughty!) from the Mission to Seamen.
Andy

Sarky Cut
19th December 2008, 21:57
Officers Bar, Crew bar, Films? All we ever had was a cardboard box of books (nothing naughty!) from the Mission to Seamen.
Andy


You don't know how lucky you were, luxury!(Jester)

trucker
19th December 2008, 22:25
Officers Bar, Crew bar, Films? All we ever had was a cardboard box of books (nothing naughty!) from the Mission to Seamen.
Andy

didn,t even have a cardboard box.(K)but had an uncle in london.

Sarky Cut
19th December 2008, 22:27
didn,t even have a cardboard box.(K)

AaaaaaaaaH never mind worse things happen at sea, as those that have been there know.(Jester)

K urgess
20th December 2008, 00:01
Time to pay up all you other Moderators.
I win the pool! (K)

I told you they wouldn't stop or go back to the thread subject. [=P]

muldonaich
20th December 2008, 00:38
reading all this rubbish makes me wonder if any one posting on this thread ever went to sea if they did i pity the poor bs that had to sail with them .

arfabuck
20th December 2008, 02:24
Officers Bar, Crew bar, Films? All we ever had was a cardboard box of books (nothing naughty!) from the Mission to Seamen.
Andy

Glad to see I am not the only one ignorant of the above! Although our books came in a wooden box, ( 2 off per trip ).

Twogrumpy your avatar looks familiar - Tal Handak?

Art

Sarky Cut
20th December 2008, 02:43
Glad to see I am not the only one ignorant of the above! Although our books came in a wooden box, ( 2 off per trip ).

Twogrumpy your avatar looks familiar - Tal Handak?

Art

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Naval_School_Tal-Handaq

With his experience he most probably knows how to make a Maltese Cross anyway. (A)

willhastie
20th December 2008, 07:03
this is giving me a great laugh,i was one of the great unwashed with both bp and ocl ,and would sit in the crew bar on social nights listening to pratts from both sides going on about them and us and would keep my mouth shut even though by the age of 36 i had set myself up for life by purchasing property in the uk at an average price of 14,000 pounds per unit, and since then i have moved on and up,in reflective moments i think back and have a giggle at it all.have a great christmas all of you,

David W
20th December 2008, 09:47
Time to pay up all you other Moderators.
I win the pool! (K)

I told you they wouldn't stop or go back to the thread subject. [=P]

Congratulations,
both you and the bullies are winners.
Bye

trucker
20th December 2008, 11:42
AaaaaaaaaH never mind worse things happen at sea, as those that have been there know.(Jester)

i see no ships,just chip,s on the proverbial shoulder.:sweat:it must be christmas.having problems with your fairy lights.

sherloc
20th December 2008, 13:43
How do you define stuffy and boring twogrumpy? From what I remember while serving as a Shaw Savill Fusiler on the Kiwi coast, who incidently would rather f*$k than fight, as the song goes, witnessed many a lovely lady swapping the stuffy rather boring realms of the Officers bar for the more laid back musical and very sexually themed atmosphere of the crew bar. If I may note that on the odd occasion we welcomed the officers wife's to our humble aboard while their hard working other halves were on watch down below!

twogrumpy
20th December 2008, 20:14
How do you define stuffy and boring twogrumpy? From what I remember while serving as a Shaw Savill Fusiler on the Kiwi coast, who incidently would rather f*$k than fight, as the song goes, witnessed many a lovely lady swapping the stuffy rather boring realms of the Officers bar for the more laid back musical and very sexually themed atmosphere of the crew bar. If I may note that on the odd occasion we welcomed the officers wife's to our humble aboard while their hard working other halves were on watch down below!

So clearly those officers wives had no taste either.
(Cloud)

stewart4866
20th December 2008, 20:46
The Christmas spirit is in full flow Stewart, under the skis of old grumpy, who I do believe is enjoying himself, and will continue to do so until us non technical people, mistakenly, connect the lecky cable to the wire tow rope and he becomes the glow[er]ing light of our Christmas decorations. Ah well back to the tabnabs

two grumpy is well earthed so no harm well come to him. (==D)

Robinj
21st December 2008, 14:35
Strange isn't it the only two people I fell out with at sea just happened to be Electricians.

Shiny
21st December 2008, 14:45
I started this thread in mid July and after a bit of to and fro with too grumpy it has lay dormant until December.
I wasn't looking for unpleasantness, I just wanted to share a Fleet News article that had made me smile...the what is a GP3? was a rhetorical question...I was one.
Now lets all make friends and promise not to fall out again.
In the words of Noddy Holder: "IT'S CHRISTMAS"!(A)

Derek Roger
21st December 2008, 15:00
I started this thread in mid July and after a bit of to and fro with too grumpy it has lay dormant until December.
I wasn't looking for unpleasantness, I just wanted to share a Fleet News article that had made me smile...the what is a GP3? was a rhetorical question...I was one.
Now lets all make friends and promise not to fall out again.
In the words of Noddy Holder: "IT'S CHRISTMAS"!(A)

Thanks for the kind words Shiny ; let happiness reign at least for now .

Kind Regards to All Derek

arfabuck
21st December 2008, 18:07
Now lets all make friends and promise not to fall out again.
In the words of Noddy Holder: "IT'S CHRISTMAS"!(A)

Amen.






Ever heard the phrase "Hook, line and sinker"?

Art

sherloc
22nd December 2008, 13:26
good afternoon twogrumpy sir! I did'nt know a great deal about taste when I was a fifteen year old boy rating neither did the ladies, we were far to busy with other less boring things! By the way twogrumpy, while I was reading your members profile I noticed a slight discrepency when you state that you don't belong to any public groups because I have it on good authority that your a fully paid up member of the Victor Meldrew society. Have a good christmas Sherloc.

twogrumpy
22nd December 2008, 19:09
Of course the quality of crew did improve "slightly" when we no longer trawled the pool, and went over to using contract staff only.
However I do recall one chief steward who had been told by the OM to go round offering crew contracts, being most unimpressed with the material available, won't use his exact words for fear of offending the sensitive.

kevjacko
22nd December 2008, 21:52
Right gents, we can spend the rest of our days bickering and trawling over all the old arguments that never got, nor ever will, get won by either side. But as it transpires some people thrive on conflict and thats a fact of life. I wish I was as perfect as some, but hey thats life. I refuse to start dredging up stories of lousy so and so's from all departments who were'nt fit to sail under the red duster above and below deck alike, that's a hell of a can of worms to open. Call this here Geordie boy a snobby b*****d if you want (it'll be a first mind) but I'm above that, and that means more to me than any clutch of tickets, qualifications, or sense of ones own importance or superiority. I will take this opportunity to wish all contributers to this thread a very merry Christmas regardless of rank or rating. Have a good un gents, here's to peace and goodwill to all men.

Sarky Cut
22nd December 2008, 23:00
Strange isn't it the only two people I fell out with at sea just happened to be Electricians.

Well said that man, remember it takes two to tango.(Jester)

Happy Christmas everybody.B\)

Derek Roger
22nd December 2008, 23:58
Gentlemen Please stop the nonsense ! If it continues we will close the thread down .

If the " Agro " follows into another thread then the Moderators will take a very hard line which could mean " walking the plank "

Please conduct yourselves in a way acceptable to the site .


Derek

orcades
23rd December 2008, 01:53
Oh my,I mistakenly thought that this site was for mariners, but it would seem that we have more than a fair share of school boys in our ranks. If you did,nt like the life at sea why on earth did you sign on? Merry Christmas to all

benjidog
23rd December 2008, 16:34
In the absence of self-control this thread is now closed. I hope we can do better on the next contentious question that arises. (Cloud)