Braemar Castle (1898)

Shipbuilder
3rd July 2008, 14:44
I have just started a miniature of the BRAEMAR CASTLE of 1898, doesn't look much at the moment, but should work out OK. To be a waterline model moving at speed with fore-and-aft sails set.

Shipbuilder
11th July 2008, 18:08
I have made some more progress on the BRAEMAR CASTLE The decks & bulwarks are fitted & the hull smoothed & ready for plating.
This type of model (miniature Victorian passenger liner) is very unpopular with modelmakers owing to the large number of portholes, side stanchions & lifeboats, but I prefer them over the usual run of models for the challenge they present. There will be no shop-bought parts in it. I normally work a lot faster than this, but have been engaged in other activities during the last week.
Bob

Jim MacIntyre
11th July 2008, 22:33
Hi Bob
A bit selfish of you to be gadding about with other activities while your SN audience is sitting here in cyberspace waiting for more pics....
A friend recently completed a small model of the American Export Lines SS 'Independence' and pondered the porthole dilemma for some time. I recall in the end he ran off several lines of 'o's on his computer, reduced them to the correct scale and printed them on a clear mylar sheet which he was able to cut out and glue to the hull. He was also able to do other small details like funnel markings in the same manner.
BTW I've been meaning to ask you about the pen - looks like and older Parker ballpoint ???
Looking forward to the next installment .
Cheers
Jim Mac..

Shipbuilder
12th July 2008, 09:23
Hi Jim,
The other actvities didn't slow me down as much as the weather actually. At this stage, I do a lot of the work of case construction, hull shaping, carrying case etc on my outside bench that has a large vice on it. I can cope with cold weather, even in the middle of winter, but rain simply stops me altogether because it would mess up the wood. It seems to rain almost every day now! That part is all behind me now though & all the remaining work can be done inside. Smaller models (six inches or so long) can be done inside my small shed, but this one at about 14.5 inches is a "big one" for me!
Bob

Shipbuilder
12th July 2008, 10:33
Hi Jim,
Me again - had to go off to breakfast before I had time to complete answering your points. The pen is a Parker, but not particlarly old. Between models, I actually use it & it will be replaced in the event of me losing it or getting glue on it. When I buy a pen, I pick it for its photogenic qualities & the Parker pen seems to be the best shape.
I also use the computer for funnel designs etc.
At one time, I stuck portholes on using telex punchings dyed black (I have several hundred thousand of them saved from the days of punched paper teleprinters at sea), but always felt they looked "stuck on."
Ages ago, I took to actually drilling out each individual porthole & they look a lot better - here is one I did earlier (British troopship DILWARA).
Bob
PS Its raining again!

Jim MacIntyre
13th July 2008, 04:12
Hi Bob
By now the pens are so famous you should try auctioning them off..
I remember the old teletypes - Siemens was the big name. There was no such thing as a 'light touch' on those machines..
I guess by the time you dyed the punchouts and stuck them on individually it might even be quicker to drill the ports.
I'm fortunate to have access every once in a while to a laser cutter. You walk in with the plans and the various styrene and aircraft plywood sheets. A few hours later you walk out with a custom 'kit' almost. Initially we came up with rough edges on the styrene cuts but reducing the intensity and making two passes solved that issue. The ports are cut out according to the plan then I finely 'slice' plastic tubing of the appropriate size and glue that on the outside. The laser cutter can also produce a whole sheet of scale decking on 1/32" plywood in about five minutes just burning straight lines. The downside is according to my nephew through whom I have access the machine costs about $40K
We talked about card models earlier - I've left the plans and some sheet styrene with my nephew and am waiting for the 'kit' - it is a 1/60 model of a Waveney class lifeboat "The Scout" plans found on Modelismo Naval Urugay as Lancha "Ades 16"
Anyway don't want to keep you from the Braemar Castle... more later
All the best
Jim Mac

Shipbuilder
13th July 2008, 09:19
Hi Jim,
The teleprinter we had on the ST. HELENA was a Creed with electronic keyboard, but mechanical works & punched paper. Dying the punchings is real easy. Put small tin of cold water black soirit dye in jar & dump in a few thousand punchings. Stir well then empty onto newspaper (outside of course) & leave to dry. When dry, they all come apart again. Fitting them is quick & easy. Small spot of white glue aplied to hull with cocktail stick. Pich up punching with point of scalpel blade & place in glue spot. Nowadays, I prefer to drill the holes individually using hand-held battery drill. Takes longer than punchings, but looks better. Finished BRAEMAR CASTLE ports yesterday after plating hull.

I use 1/32nd marine plywood for decks & score them using a plank-scoring machine that I made myself. Doesn't take long. here is example.
Bob

Shipbuilder
14th July 2008, 14:38
More progress has been made with the hull plating, portholes & painting complete. The bulwarks have also been panelled. Once the fixing holes in the welldecks are covered by hatches, it will be more like a real ship being built & will soon take on the aspect & character of BRAEMAR CASTLE (1898)
Bob

Shipbuilder
19th July 2008, 19:15
Coming along nicely now with the boat deck fitted & the main sections of guardrails & side stanchions in place. Also wheelhouse, officers accommodation & upper bridge fitted. Filled with enthusiasm now, following successful sale by auction of HMS EREBUS & Tea Clipper NORMAN COURT, by auction in London on the 17th.
Bob

Shipbuilder
21st July 2008, 20:23
Done a bit more & fitted the smokestack. Will have a few days off now.
Bob

Shipbuilder
28th July 2008, 19:56
Have just returned from my few days off (London - boiling hot) & resumed work on the BRAEMAR CASTLE. Hatches now fitted, also 8 cargo winches & windlass. Hope to be moving along a bit quicker now.
Bob

Shasta
2nd August 2008, 05:41
Absolutely superb work, very crisp and well detailed. What scale is she?

Shipbuilder
2nd August 2008, 08:34
Hi Shasta,
Thanks. Scale is 32'=1" & the hull length is about 14.5 inches overall.
Click on
Miniature Merchant Ships (below) to see more.
Bob

Shipbuilder
4th August 2008, 20:47
Just spent all day making the 15 lifeboats, so pretty fed up, glad that they are complete, but looking at this enlargement, I see a couple of them need a few "adjustments!" Coin is Quarter Dollar US.
Bob

Shipbuilder
13th August 2008, 10:00
The BRAEMAR CASTLE is "coming down the straight" now & I hope to have her completed later today. Only main, mizzen & jigger masts to rig. My wife painted the sea two days ago & the display case is completed & awaiting the model.
Bob

Shipbuilder
14th August 2008, 08:16
Finished at last!
The service speed of the BRAEMAR CASTLE was 15.3 knots. She was the first of the company steamers NOT to have square sails & was the LAST single screw vessel they had. Although fitted with sails, they would not have been in common use. Maybe in the case of engine failure & even then not very effective. When I joined the company in 1965, some of the older officers could remember seting sail in these ships on the rare occasions of engine failure, but they only gave steerage way even in high winds. Although she lasted for 26 years, she only served about 11 of them in the company. The other years were spent under government charter before, during & after the war as either a troopship or hospital ship. She made an amazing 776 voyages as a hospital ship and during that time carried a staggering 2,655,025 patients - a truly remarkable number.
To me at least, ships like this are far more beautiful than the stumpy warships of Naopleonic times & it is a great pity more interest is not shown in them by modelmakers.
Bob

onestar
14th August 2008, 17:34
Congratulations! She looks a real gem, and I think you have captured the feel of that lovely era. The lifeboats and davits are excellent and so often not properly done on models.