Useful engineroom stuff

DaveO
4th July 2008, 17:04
Thinking back to my days in BP enginerooms, i seem to remember the three most important things to keep the job going.
1. Devcon - plastic steel and plastic bronze. Good for building up pump casings etc as it can be machined.
2. Thistlebond - repaired many sea water lines which were like lace curtains with this stuff.
3. Tespa band, a sort of DIY Jubilee clip. 1001 uses.

Its amazing what can be done when the lights are about to go out.

Happy days.

chadburn
4th July 2008, 17:29
The "Queen City" Reardon Smiths use to be called the Thistlebond Queen!

WilliamH
4th July 2008, 17:35
What about cement? I have seen some chippies that were masters of the cement box.

DAVELECKIE
4th July 2008, 19:23
Can remember on the Pioneer a couple of days North of Cape Town heading for Europort fully loaded when a ships side sea water inlet pipe burst open outboard of the v/v.
Although only approx. from memory a 6 inch line the bilge pumps struggled to cope with the water coming in.
After frantic efforts with rubber jointing/tespa band etc a cement box was put around the stub pipe and this partially stemmed the flow.
We proceeded to Las Palmas with the bilge pumps running non stop and just about keeping the "status quo".
We all breathed a sigh of relief when the divers went down and blocked the pipe so repairs could be carried out!

Dave

raybnz
5th July 2008, 08:56
The Waipawa when I sailed on her was about at the end of her life. The second engineer reckon a pipe had to 85% thistle bond before it needed replacing.

We used spare fire bricks to build a wall around the back of the engine so we could contain the lub. oil that was escaping from the main engines. It was bucketed up and put through the purifier then back in the sump for reuse. I think today its called recycling.

Cement was quite popular repairing worn out and leaking valves.

albert.s.i
5th July 2008, 09:19
i was on a scuffler cantick head my first coal fire job steaming north i went from the stoke hole to the engine and noticed water running down the ship side i asked the old chief sitting by the controls what it was he said oh the cement box wants seeing too i should think she went to the scap yard with it ship was so old and probibley the last ship where firemen did 4 on and 4 off cheers albert.s.i

Hamish Mackintosh
6th July 2008, 01:35
If you can't fix it with duct tape, you ai'nt using enough !!

makko
6th July 2008, 01:50
Not Thistle Bond, but another member of the Devcon family, for my life I can't remember which product.....

The latter BF "M", Memnon (77), had a bronze spool in the steel SW line. Obviously, due to galvanic action, the bronze "dezinced" and we wrapped more and more GRP bandages around said spool. We transmitted ahead for a replacement steel spool to the agent in Maracaibo. When I removed the spool, there was basically no metallic part left. Bloody good stuff! Wish I could remember its name!!! LoLs!
Dave

Tony Morris
6th July 2008, 03:58
Could it have been Cordabond?

spongebob
6th July 2008, 04:33
During WW2 the HMNZ Bird Class Minesweeper "KIWI" dropped a depth charge that went off prematurely springing some hull plates under the prop shaft tunnel.
She got back to port and to make a temporary repair the tunnel was filled with concrete almost up to the plummer blocks before she went back on patrol.
At least ten years later I worked on her as an apprentice and the concrete was still there but covered in at least ten coats of red "Solphar" paving paint.
Apparently she had never leaked and plate thickness checks had proved that there was little corrosion going on so as an old ship I guess they chose to let sleeping dogs lie.

tunatownshipwreck
6th July 2008, 05:31
If you can't fix it with duct tape, you ai'nt using enough !!

All hail Red Green!

Don Matheson
6th July 2008, 15:25
Best place in the workshop was the "lucky drawer". Told about this by a very good donkeyman who reckoned everything you needed was in there. All the old bits you did not need or did not know what it was went in there. Amazing the number of repairs you could make with something from the lucky drawer. Wise old donkeyman saved me many times over the years.

Don

R58484956
7th July 2008, 15:25
Broomhandle for plugging small holes in ships side. The old QE ran for about 4 months with 3 plugs in her until we drydocked in December.

chadburn
7th July 2008, 15:38
I think that most Marine Engineers even though now Retired still have a "Lucky Drawer" or "I will hang on to that just in case", my lucky drawer goes by another name THE GARAGE where I can no longer get the car in!!

K urgess
7th July 2008, 15:44
Not just Marine Engineers, chadburn.
I thought car garage as a phrase was an oxymoron.
I feel I must put a word in for the worst magpies on the planet. Sparkies. [=P]

Cheers
Kris

chris thompson195
25th October 2008, 21:25
I think that most Marine Engineers even though now Retired still have a "Lucky Drawer" or "I will hang on to that just in case", my lucky drawer goes by another name THE GARAGE where I can no longer get the car in!!

I still have bits that I keep and can never find when I need them.
Is it just a geordie thing or is it just cause we're just to bloody cautious!!

tankerman2
31st October 2008, 17:07
I started with a lucky shelf in the shed. Now the whole shed is lucky. I thought it was only me, but after reading this crews notes I can see it was all marine engineers. On the beach now for over 30 years but still remember the lucky draw.

chadburn
31st October 2008, 17:41
Hello Tankerman 2, have you seen the advert about making a Will, how true it is, it goes along the lines of when the Father passes away the Will was the easy part, sorting the shed/garage out is going to take some time to complete!! Are Whitworth spanners worth anything these days?

Marconi, just picked up on your piece on R/O's and spares, when I was home on leave in the 60's one of my favourite haunts was "John's Radio" in Leeds which I use to go down to to buy surplus working two-way radio's to fiddle about with, the sale of these radio's was based on the receipt containing the wording "For Spares Only" which was a bit of a cover for the sale to be completed. What was number of the ex Tank Sets (Type 20's?) which with a little bit of "adjustment" could be made to trans/rec long distance, any idea's?

K urgess
31st October 2008, 18:42
Don't remember those, Geordie Chief.
They were still flogging those US Army WWII two-way radios in Boyes on Hessle Road when I was into that sort of thing.
Best my pocket money could stretch to was the Air Ministry aircraft morse key or the tank periscope (never knew when you would need one [=P])
I've been trying to make up for my parents moving house while I was at sea and leaving all my stuff behind ever since.
Almost there. (Thumb)

R651400
31st October 2008, 19:05
Chadburn, think you're referring to the 19 set which still has an international following.

chadburn
31st October 2008, 19:08
As you are a Yorkshire Lad I thought you might have come from the Leeds area before "emigrating" to the smell of the sea after your sea-time ended, but I read you are a Kingston Man. I was interested in the old S.A.R.A.H. sets with the measuring tape type antenna which sprung out when you pulled the pin, I am still called Gadget Man with all the "valuable" bits I keep in the garage, they may after all come in handy ONE DAY!!

R651400, can they still get the bits for them from Army Surplus stores?

Blackal
31st October 2008, 19:37
Thinking back to my days in BP enginerooms, i seem to remember the three most important things to keep the job going.
1. Devcon - plastic steel and plastic bronze. Good for building up pump casings etc as it can be machined.
2. Thistlebond - repaired many sea water lines which were like lace curtains with this stuff.
3. Tespa band, a sort of DIY Jubilee clip. 1001 uses.
.

See! You worked for a posh company....................


We used to use "monkey dung" (Thumb) (generic term for 1, 2 & 3 - above)

Al :D