Cunard memories

john g
18th June 2005, 22:26
Ok all you guys who out there can claim to be ..."A Cunard Yank"..and what is your definition..?..............john g...ex cunard-brocklebank 1965-1972 but I think the story starts well before my time.

sailingday
12th July 2007, 15:51
Ok all you guys who out there can claim to be ..."A Cunard Yank"..and what is your definition..?..............john g...ex cunard-brocklebank 1965-1972 but I think the story starts well before my time.

mainly tourist waiters in the post war years, every trip to new york, we would buy american gear, and back in liverpool, we be in the pubs all dressed up with packs of luckies or pall mall, change left on the bar, we thought we were the cat's whiskers, but even to day 50 odd years later we still take a pride in our appearance.

sparkie2182
12th July 2007, 21:45
an interesting piece by tommy steele a few weeks ago on bbc radio 2.
he was talking of his time in the m.n. as steward, and being one of the first to experience the "rock" craze when alongside in new york.......then within weeks, bring it to the u.k.i think it was the queen of bermuda (furness withy) he referred to, also the samaria.
within 4 weeks of his first appearance with this new american craze........he was top of the bill at sunderland empire......such was its instant popularity.

Cunarder
12th July 2007, 22:48
Geez - is Tommy Steele still going? I remember watching him in "Half a Sixpence" on the Mahsud I think - another blockbuster from Cattermouls (spelling?)

Alan Marsden

sparkie2182
12th July 2007, 23:11
yep........still going........:)

as r/o for radio and electronic services.......i remember cattermoule and also walport.........very well...........

i once swapped a set of films to a soviet ship when we were alongside in basra. they were the "confession" series of films......confessions of a taxi driver........window cleaner........driving instructor ect:
they were popular on uk ships as they were mildly "skin flicks"........but HUGELY popular to the eastern bloc ships companies.........:) they loved em. i was on the port alfred on the south american/middle east run (samel)

i knew the russians had a habit of sailing off with films which had been loaned to them........but i let them go anyway.

they kept them for 3 weeks.......untill sailing time......the returned them with many bottles of vodka and wine for me........:) apparantly i was a legend in the soviet merchant fleet after that...........hahahahahah..........:)

i also was invited aboard the russian freighter, which was really interesting.......another world.......she sailed between cuba and iraq.......bringing sugar to iraq and general goods to cuba.i always remember the alleyways.....framed photos of devestated soviet cities.......aerial pics of stalingrad.......moscow........leningrad. this was mid 1970s.........but they still lived with this daily.

they lived dreadfull lives at sea.......awfull pay and leave .........i was pleased to let them have a bit of enjoyment, they were only seafarers like ourselves.

i was shown around by the mate, a great guy, good english, good humour but had to leave when the ships "doctor"......aka....... political commisar......turned up.

the vodka was good..........

a memorable time.........

best regards, alan, from another cunarder.

Cunarder
15th July 2007, 23:13
Sparkie (name?)

Thanks for that - I had been wracking my poor addled brain for the name of the other movie outfit "Walports" - at least I can but that one to rest. It seems a long way now from today when we can watch movies at the flick of a switch to the movie nights onboard. Setting up the projector - oooo and the widescreen anamorphic lens too if you were lucky! - Purser busy preparing fish and chips in newspaper - quite an event. Usually a bit of a decision too for the R/O with the end of the movie invariably coinciding with the evening 8-10!

I too recall the movie swaps with adjacent Russian ships - how they would pounce on our filthy, western movies but were quite embarrased about their own. As you say - usually endless reels of people working in the fields happily waving to hoardes of Tupolev bombers passing overhead! But there were some good pourouts with the Russkies who, I recall, were always a good laugh once they'd had a few scoops and had let their guard drop a little.

Oh happy days...
Alan

sparkie2182
15th July 2007, 23:31
hello alan...........

i remember sending some films across to a soviet ship.......somewhere in the pacific islands i think........and receiving a set of army green "jerry cans"....in which their films were housed........for us to watch...........:) they must have been 25 years old............
whenever i swapped films with the soviets ships, there was a possibility of not getting them back........as you know.
the films they sent to us, were so obviously awfull......also in russian language , of course......as to be useless to us.
nevertheless, i never lost one reel of our films,and they were always courteous .....which is more than i can say for everone i met at sea...:)
and am pleased to have given them a bit of pleasure............

i know they didnt get a lot of that in their lives...........:(

best regards from another cunarder..........

allan lawson.................r & e.s. (began as sponsored cadet.........bill curry, arthur orum.....angus mcdonald et al)


p.s.........i bet those old soviet movies would be worth a fortune these days to historical t.v. movie channel producers

Frank Holleran
16th July 2007, 03:43
"Cunard Yanks"....I thought it was "Cunard Cowboys"
Regards
Frank

john g
22nd July 2007, 16:19
Geez - is Tommy Steele still going? I remember watching him in "Half a Sixpence" on the Mahsud I think - another blockbuster from Cattermouls (spelling?)

Alan Marsden

Saw that film so many times on the ????? we ended up playing it backwards knew all the tunes same goes for "Sweet Charity". Today the younger generation look at me like I'm crazy when I quote bit from those films........anyone wlse got films locked in their minds ??

R58484956
22nd July 2007, 16:51
Saw "Ivanhoe" about 30 times on board and I think we knew every word that was spoken off by heart.

nobby s
25th July 2007, 15:25
Hi john g. I think we are diversifying a bit here. The definition of a "Cunard Yank?" Well yes it certainly goes back a bit but I dont think anyone can lay claim to being the inventor. It's just a term for Cunard crew who tip freely e.g. £1 on a 5 bob taxi ride, 2/6p on a 2/6p hair cut, 2/-s on a 4d cup of tea,someone who sports a full wrangler outfit and all done with a psuedo american accent! I've met and sailed with a few. Havent we all Ha Ha Ha!!(I've just realised I'm showin' my age with the money thing !!!)

RCHARLTON
25th July 2007, 18:42
I suppose in some ways I could lay claim to being a Cunard Yank since I sailed the North Atlantic with Cunard and have now lived in the States for over 35 years but that is obviously not the real definition. I think the following clip shows the true definition:-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5xjcGcCkBk

neville
7th April 2009, 15:58
I did many trips on the Sylvania ,and Carinthia , as a tourist mule . and Cunard cowboy , we got the name of the holliwood boys ,still dont know why except that we always were posing for the girls . the cd of the cunard yanks I have a copy in US mode that a buddy of mine in the UK sent out too me and I had copied , George Salmon was in it and he and I were partners for 2 years in charlie browns ale and chop house in NYC, I was there for 21 years before moving too Florida in 86, now retired in Leesburg fl. those were the days my friends(Thumb) (Thumb)

Pat Kennedy
7th April 2009, 18:04
It wasnt just the American gear, it was the Noo Yawk accent adopted after one trip to the States.

sidsal
7th April 2009, 20:27
I came over on the old Queen Mary to Southampton twice after leaving tankers in NY and saw the stewards' wives waiting on the quayside in their Jags and other posh cars. Of course they made a fortune in tips. In those days (50-60's) cabin class had six or more to a cabin and each would give the steward a fiver. As he would look after several cabins he would get a tidy sum every five days . No bad going.
I was told also thet the Yeoward Line of Liverpool, pre ww2 did cruises to the Canaries from ther Pool - Liverpool typists and so forth were their passengers. Apparently the Chief Stewrd pocketed all the wages of his staff and they worled on tips only. You had to be very well in to get a job as a steward there.

holland25
7th April 2009, 23:02
I only did 6 trips on a Cunarder,the Parthia.I was 3rd R/O znd I have often thought that the steward who looked after us must have been a bit disappointed. I suppose as in all things they had to get some time in.

TonyAllen
8th April 2009, 16:23
I.knocked around with Jonny Hibbet,and Ritchy barton in the early 50s and they were true liverpool yanks in dress and demeanor, Jonny I think was the first person to bring a polaroid land camera to england.He brought it into a pub in hall lane liverpool called the majestic and was showing it to all his mates, an old fella bet him ten bob that he could not take a picture their and then and show it back on the bar which he did, and the pub was in uproar to see the photo emerge from the camera and develope in front of our eyes.he gave the old fella his 10bob back and it was talked about for weeks after,I was on the china boats at the time Cheers Tony Allen

R58484956
9th April 2009, 16:17
Market diner, sally army, 110v fridges, fruit of the loom. nylons.

john g
14th April 2009, 19:28
Market diner, sally army, 110v fridges, fruit of the loom. nylons.

Stroll on.....that sums it forever !!

R58484956
14th April 2009, 19:54
John, 110v fridges could be seen on board in their dozens up the crew quarters, then customs took action and informed Cunard that cargo charges be applied to fridges and that stopped imports virtually over night.
(For non seafarers crew bought fridges in the sally army for next to nothing and sold them in the Uk for a handsome profit, plus of course having to upgrade to a 240v motor.)

Derek Roger
17th April 2009, 13:50
I suppose in some ways I could lay claim to being a Cunard Yank since I sailed the North Atlantic with Cunard and have now lived in the States for over 35 years but that is obviously not the real definition. I think the following clip shows the true definition:-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5xjcGcCkBk

Thanks for that Ray very good reply to the question .

Cheers Derek

peter johnston
8th July 2009, 23:38
just to note ! george harrison bought a "Guild" guitar from New york,from a waiter on the carinthia....cunard yanks knew how to pose and dress..and get mentioned tooo!

tom roberts
12th July 2009, 23:26
Last year my daughter bought. me tickets to the premier of Cunard Yanks at the Philarmonic Liverpool a documentary about four ex Cunard wingers who appeared on stage with their wives and John Gilmore and the others were still as dapper as ever still wearing the same old suits as ever Johns mother in law said to her daughter you are not marrying a man you are marrying a suit Granada T.V. have shown the film its worth watching