Bovril boats

DURANGO
7th July 2008, 17:09
Will anyone else own up to having been in a bovril boat i spent a couple of weeks in the old Henry Ward in 1962 i was just killing time while waiting for a ship ,i needed to spend a month in her realy but in those days you used to do your own cooking there was a cook in her but i think you had to pay him up front and if memory serves i was skint at the time , i remember having to phone my dear old father from the pumping station at beckton to bring me some food down on the next turn around i remember he was not that impressed, in the end i could suffer me own cooking no longer and jacked it in hapy days .

chadburn
8th July 2008, 12:47
Like yourself I spent time in the early days of my Career and between deep sea voyages on unusual boats although not a "Bovril" boat, one was a paddle tug and the other a trailing arm Suction Dredger with the Boilers in the Bow and the engineroom/ pumproom in the stern with the Hoppers inbetween. Both were very "Para Handy" with a scruffy Cabin Boy who cooked a great Full English, for a fee up front and the food provided by me.

RWilliams
8th July 2008, 13:54
I had the fortune of being invited for a day trip on the Sir Joseph Baslegette in 1980 when I was working ashore and had left Houlder Bros on 1974. We boarded at Crossness with a cargo of treated sewage bound for the Barrow Deep where it was to be offloaded. I had no idea what to expect, but the chap organising the trip from Thames Water thought that sandwiches may be provided during the day. However we were welcomed in the officers dining saloon with a full breakfast and sailed shortly afterwards. We had a full tour of the ship and it was spotless. The engineroom was imaculate and I even had an opportunitity of taking the helm on our passage down the river. The lunch was a typical five courses and an evening meal of seven courses. Typical deep sea style with silver service. The only indication of the nature of the cargo was when it discharged leaving a brown stain on the sea and a rather nasty niff for a few minutes.
The only downside of the trip was I had told my wife that my expectation for the victualling was not high, so she had prepared a full steak and kindney pudding with vegitables and potatoes for my return expecting me to me very hungry. It was a struggle not to disallusion her.
It is understandable why this trade came to an end but it was a lovely ship and I imagine a good job.

benjidog
9th July 2008, 00:02
Durango,

There are a number of threads concerning Bovril boats - the most comprenhensive is this one that I started a couple of years ago: http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=6258

Regards,

Brian

spongebob
9th July 2008, 00:24
Thanks for the clarification Brian, reading this new thread gave me the impression that a "Bovril" boat was a poor feeder or one where you had to do your own catering. In NZ we use Marmite or Vegemite as a spread or a hot nourishing drink.
The Auckland waterfront used to have an old rubbish scow that was called the "Gut Boat" and every morning it used to go to the seaward side of all ships in port to collect all the galley food scraps and waste before going out to a deep water spot just off Rangitoto Island light to dump it.
The fish got to know and it was claimed that they used to swim from miles around for this morning banquet. It was known as the best fishing spot in the Hauraki Gulf

Fairfield
9th July 2008, 10:09
Never served in one but sailed a few times on GARROCH HEAD one of the Glasgow ones.

chadburn
9th July 2008, 14:59
Bob, did you not have a "Dash of Sherry" with your Vegemite/Marmite hot drink My Dear Chap!!

celsis
10th July 2008, 10:38
I had the fortune of being invited for a day trip on the Sir Joseph Baslegette in 1980 when I was working ashore and had left Houlder Bros on 1974. We boarded at Crossness with a cargo of treated sewage bound for the Barrow Deep where it was to be offloaded. I had no idea what to expect, but the chap organising the trip from Thames Water thought that sandwiches may be provided during the day. However we were welcomed in the officers dining saloon with a full breakfast and sailed shortly afterwards. We had a full tour of the ship and it was spotless. The engineroom was imaculate and I even had an opportunitity of taking the helm on our passage down the river. The lunch was a typical five courses and an evening meal of seven courses. Typical deep sea style with silver service. The only indication of the nature of the cargo was when it discharged leaving a brown stain on the sea and a rather nasty niff for a few minutes.
The only downside of the trip was I had told my wife that my expectation for the victualling was not high, so she had prepared a full steak and kindney pudding with vegitables and potatoes for my return expecting me to me very hungry. It was a struggle not to disallusion her.
It is understandable why this trade came to an end but it was a lovely ship and I imagine a good job.

An 'Officers Dining Saloon' ona sh*t boat? How quaint!(A) (A) (A)