Engine Identification

steviej
9th July 2008, 15:23
Anybody Identify this engine?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9wcMdqGVuS4&feature=related

JamesM
9th July 2008, 16:34
steviej,
By the look of the top piston telescopics these are 2 x 6cly opposed piston B&W's.
JamesM

twogrumpy
9th July 2008, 19:36
My goodness, where did this come from and how old is it?
twogrumpy

makko
9th July 2008, 20:16
I agree with JamesM. If its H&W, 1955, then its a H&W opposed piston engine. Similar engines were fitted to BFs. I am sure that the large 2S had an open Rootes blower - There were tales of people falling in and getting "minced"!

Rgds.
Dave

steviej
10th July 2008, 12:24
The Portugese gent who put the video on his youtube site also has this video, one which I have not seen before and of really good quality.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMb5GLMdFNY

JamesM
10th July 2008, 12:52
steviej,
Yes, good footage of 2 x 6 Cyl.opposed piston DOXFORD engines, possibly LB's.
JamesM

d.r.wing
10th July 2008, 15:41
I had the privilege of sailing on ships with both of these engines and in my gallery pictures wrongly identified a B@W as a Doxford (I was quickly corrected by observant members) the pic's show work on a cylinder in progess

doric
18th July 2008, 08:00
My first deep sea voyage, as a junior Elect. Engr., was in 1950, on Dominion Monarch, which had four Doxfords, quite an eye opener for this "greenie" from the valleys of Wales!. Terence Williams. R538301.

roboted
9th September 2008, 14:15
First vid link is B&W single acting double oppose,twin roots blowers as fitted to Blue Flue Anchises class ie Laomedon,Adrastus,Elpenor etc.Second vid is Doxford as
Dummura,Diedo etc ED's

raybnz
10th September 2008, 09:38
Now that video brought back some memories. My first thought was those hoses. The bubble that first appeared in the hose and then steadily grew in size.

Oh how I would love to be walking the tops again.

Bill Davies
10th September 2008, 09:44
To all the Engineers,
Why is it that German Engine builders number the units from aft to fwd and class seem to number fwd to aft. I have heard that German numbering is correct as they invented the Diesel engine and the first had one cylinder only (the drive).
Have experienced several cases where C/E had me sending telegrams to HO to sort out the problem.

jabegren
12th October 2008, 14:05
Its not a B&W (Burmeister and Wain. Danish engine builder). Its a Doxford.

surfaceblow
12th October 2008, 17:23
Bill
I had the same problem once about the numbering of the cylinders on a engine. Sulzer numbered the cylinders from the governor end (drive end). The class always numbered things forward to aft and have been in business a lot longer. On the Marine Reliance the First Engineer was to get ready to pull a exhaust valve for the normal maintenance he had all of the bolts loose and was ready to pull the valve when I got to the engine room and he discovered that he had miscounted and was on the wrong cylinder. Since the valve was ready to be lifted I said to pull it anyway. While the valve was in the air you could see that there was a start of a hole in the valve. So I told the First that he pulled the correct valve. After that numbers were painted on each cylinder to go with the machinery history on the engine.

760J9
12th October 2008, 23:20
Definitely not a Doxford, even more definitely not an LB or LBD

Glencannon
15th October 2008, 21:03
The first one is one of the main engines of the Princess Danae B&W 6-75VTF-150/50 license built by Harland & Wolfe, as far as I know of course. You can see the IMO number on a ventilation trunk.. : 5282483
The second one is Doxford, with all those horrible hoses..
Cheers..

JKB
11th August 2009, 08:03
To all the Engineers,
Why is it that German Engine builders number the units from aft to fwd and class seem to number fwd to aft. I have heard that German numbering is correct as they invented the Diesel engine and the first had one cylinder only (the drive).
Have experienced several cases where C/E had me sending telegrams to HO to sort out the problem.

At Mirrlees Blackstone we produced some engines which were numbered from the free end, e.g. K Majors, and some which were numbered from the flywheel end, e.g. MB275s, MB430s. The same thing happened over the years with vee engines as regards which was A Bank and which was B Bank. The reason for the change was the British Standard in force at the time the engines were designed.
It could cause chaos, we had an incident on a Scottish ferry where the Chief Engineer was told by the Super to pull a unit overnight, counted from the wrong end, decided to change the shells as they were looking a bit ropey and so changed them without measuring the con. rod. The large end failed when he ran it up as the bore had gone oval over the years and there was no clearance with the new shells.
We also had a lot of trouble on the railways, they traditionally number cylinders from the free end and the MB275Ts they have number from the flywheel so we always had to clarify which cylinder we were supposed to be investigating.

Billieboy
11th August 2009, 11:07
The first one is one of the main engines of the Princess Danae B&W 6-75VTF-150/50 license built by Harland & Wolfe, as far as I know of course. You can see the IMO number on a ventilation trunk.. : 5282483
The second one is Doxford, with all those horrible hoses..
Cheers..

Have to agree, the main difference between B&W and Doxford are the elastic bands, which is what keeps a Doxford going!(==D)

bobs
11th August 2009, 12:55
According to Lloyd's Register, PRINCESS DANAE (ex-PORT MELBOURNE) is - as Glencannon says - powered by two Harland + Wolff-built Burmeister and Wain 6-75VTF-150/50 six-cylinder, single-acting, two-stroke, opposed-piston engines, each producing 6,599 bhp.
There are no Doxfords in PRINCESS DANAE but her near-sister vessel PRINCESS DAPHNE (ex-PORT SYDNEY) is propelled by a pair of Doxford 6LBD6 engines of the same layout as the B+Ws in DANAE, and almost identical output of 6,601 bhp at 112 rpm each. These Doxfords were built by Wallsend Slipway Engineers Ltd

hamishb
11th August 2009, 23:02
The engines shown are definately 750 ,1500 x 500 H&W, B&W type identifieable by the shape of the exhaust piston yoke. Tightened lots of these tie rod nuts using a monday hammer while serving my time with John G Kincaid.

ianian
11th August 2009, 23:21
I agree with JamesM. If its H&W, 1955, then its a H&W opposed piston engine. Similar engines were fitted to BFs. I am sure that the large 2S had an open Rootes blower - There were tales of people falling in and getting "minced"!

Rgds.
Dave

Worked on these a long time a go with rootes blower and turbo blowers, never heard any body fell in and got minced, some one has been pulling your leg. Regards ianian

ccurtis1
11th August 2009, 23:52
On the Doxford vid, didn't see the lub oil hoses which were fitted between the cooling water hoses on ships I sailed on, or is my memory playing tricks yet again. Fixed quadrant and rocking quadrants on the top piston and those dreadful "banjo" cooling water pipes in the crankcase. I recall we had dozens of spare "banjo's" wired up in the shaft tunnel because they were a right bugger to find one to fit. Ah , wish I were back in the 60's on those ships.

Billieboy
12th August 2009, 05:10
On the Doxford vid, didn't see the lub oil hoses which were fitted between the cooling water hoses on ships I sailed on, or is my memory playing tricks yet again. Fixed quadrant and rocking quadrants on the top piston and those dreadful "banjo" cooling water pipes in the crankcase. I recall we had dozens of spare "banjo's" wired up in the shaft tunnel because they were a right bugger to find one to fit. Ah , wish I were back in the 60's on those ships.

I appreciate your longing for the old days and the challenge of a Doxford engine. I too like a challenge, but a water cooled Doxford, with steam auxilliaries is a little too far.(==D)

cubpilot
12th August 2009, 12:27
Not sure that the doxford had any oil pipes to the top piston yoke, i think lubrication was grease from pots on the guides. very little motion in the top yoke bushes to merit oil lubrication.

ccurtis1
12th August 2009, 12:50
Not sure that the doxford had any oil pipes to the top piston yoke, i think lubrication was grease from pots on the guides. very little motion in the top yoke bushes to merit oil lubrication.

Memory may be playing a few tricks but I still seem to recall two smaller hoses between the PCW hoses. It was a long time ago however