Q-Code

Glyndwr
9th July 2008, 15:31
Following the question about the Morse code I cannot remember who invented the Q-Code. We have all used this to the extreme but I cant for the life of me remember it's origin. QSQ - I will always remeber this as Quick Send Quack or Is there a doctor on board?

I wonder whether it is still taught anywhere?

G4UMW
9th July 2008, 15:40
Some Q-codes are still used in aviation - QFE, QNH, QDM, QTE and (unofficially) QSY.

Then, of course, there were QLF (Please try sending with your left foot) and QFO (Go away).

Rob

tunatownshipwreck
9th July 2008, 18:40
When I was a kid a R/O named me "QRM".

BobClay
9th July 2008, 21:09
When Q's have failed, and you're doubt.
Think 4Q2, and tap it out.

BobClay
9th July 2008, 21:10
sorry.....

.... and you're in doubt ....

(takes double triode out of head and polishes the pins).

Don Armour
16th July 2008, 21:02
Some Q-codes are still used in aviation - QFE, QNH, QDM, QTE and (unofficially) QSY.

Then, of course, there were QLF (Please try sending with your left foot) and QFO (Go away).

Rob

Rob, there's also QNE (Standard Pressure Setting - 1013.2 Hpa) and QFU (Runway magnetic bearing), both decodes are precis of the full definitions.

Don

G4UMW
17th July 2008, 13:00
Rob, there's also QNE (Standard Pressure Setting - 1013.2 Hpa) and QFU (Runway magnetic bearing), both decodes are precis of the full definitions.

Don


I'd forgotten those, Don - I've only been working in aviation for 27 years! :confused:


Rob

mikeg
17th July 2008, 13:39
I'd learnt QFU? as Runway in use? Example Reply QFU23 for runway 23, but never heard that Q code used yet.

G4UMW
17th July 2008, 15:03
I'd learnt QFU? as Runway in use? Example Reply QFU23 for runway 23, but never heard that Q code used yet.

It's probably fallen foul of the censor!


Rob

Don Armour
17th July 2008, 17:57
QFU can still be found on many Airfield Approach Charts, a more accurate definition is "Runway orientation" (NO, I'm NOT kidding!!)

Runways are numbered according to their magnetic orientation, rounded up or down, e.g. Runway 24 at RAF Lyneham lies on a bearing (QFU) of 244 degrees magnetic and when it was on 245 degrees or more, it was runway 25.

It's not normally used in communications, in fact most aircrews who ask, ask for the QDM, not strictly correct for a runway heading, it's the magnetic bearing to a landing aid such as an ILS, so if it's an offset aid, then it won't be the same as the runway heading. Clear as mud??

Some web links for those who are interested in Q and Z Codes

http://www.kloth.net/radio/qcodes.php

http://www.kloth.net/radio/zcodes.php

The parent site has loads of information on various aspects of radio

http://www.kloth.net/radio/

And this site, I think, has some of the older definitions of both Codes (I haven't read them all!!)

http://www.ussindependence.us/acp_131.htm

Don