Captains cabin Stbd side?

RichW
24th July 2008, 04:33
Why is the captains cabin traditionally on the stbd side of the vessel?.
I was told it was so the Capt could keep an eye on a stbd crossing vessel, but there are a few different opinions onboard as usual.

stein
24th July 2008, 13:40
Side-hung rudder on starboard side, therefore the side of the course decider? Just a suggestion; much tradition probably had a haphazard origin. When I was at sea, the whole deck crew were housed on the starboard side, but those without stripes had to enter the bridge on port side. Such "traditions" are gone now, and many will say good riddance. Regards, Stein.

JoK
24th July 2008, 13:58
Interesting. I have been mentally reviewing the ships I sailed on and the majority had the Captain's cabin on the stbd side.
Never noticed that before.

ROBERT HENDERSON
24th July 2008, 14:21
I have looked back on all the ships I have sailed on including coasters and the Captains cabin has been on the stbd. side. I have never really given it any thought before.
Where oh where are all our maritime historical experts when they are needed?

sparkie2182
24th July 2008, 14:24
there was a post here which explained the siting of the masters cabin extremely well.
i think it was possibly a little off topic to the main thread, so perhaps whoever was responsible for it may repost.

JohnGrace
24th July 2008, 14:27
I had heard that it was because ships usually went alongside port side to the jetty and if the old man was on the otherside he might get a bit more peace

JimC
24th July 2008, 16:57
Some of the ships I sailed on the captain had a deck to himself with the 'serfs' occupying the deck below -2M port F, 3M midship F, C/O starboard Fand 4/O starboard side.
Most of Denholm ships I sailed on were similar to that. (I think).

Jim C.

David Davies
24th July 2008, 17:01
The starboard side is the superior side by tradition. In flag etiquette the starboard yardarm is superior to the port yardarm, in the Royal Navy officers were hung on the starb'd yard arm, others on the port, (admirals were shot). In collision regs for sail, the starb'd tack is superior to the port , port gives way. In many companies with a sailing ship derivation i.e. NZSCo the master occupied the whole fore part, with the mates cabins on the starb'd side, engineers on the port side. (the mates were at sea before the engineers, engineers being considered newcomers to the sea. In two watch system the starb'd contained the best seamen under the mate, the port watch the less experienced seamen under the 2nd mate, this demarcation was later reflected in fore and aft stations. Which end were you? I must admit that in my 4 years on deck, most of my time was down aft with the 2nd mate.

trotterdotpom
24th July 2008, 20:09
When they switched the Mate from the focsle to the bridge during manoevres he was replaced up for'ard by the 3rd Mate. I was told this was partly to give the Mate experience of ship handling during berthing and what not, and partly so they could see what a new 3rd Mate was up to - the 2nd Mate down aft was expected to no what he was on about.

John T.

John_F
24th July 2008, 20:25
Every vessel I served on in BP (9) had the Old Man's cabin on the port side.
On the Queen (the largest one that I served on) he had office, dayroom, bathroom & bedroom, on a deck all to himself below the bridge.
Kind regards,
John.

Tony Breach
24th July 2008, 21:41
On every ship where I was master, except one, it was starboard. Having had the experience, during daylight hours, of hearing five short & rapids on my own ship's whistle, without the wally on the bridge calling me first, the first thing I wanted to see was what the hell was on my port side. I beleive that BP with the old man on the port side was correct.

Oh, and the ship where I wasn't on the starboard side was the KHALIJ CRYSTAL, ex ZEALANDIC where I was abaft the bridge & sort of underneath the funnel. I couldn't see forward at all but the mate & the chief could - I may have had a direct route to the bridge but I was not at all impressed. The logic of me having a cabin on the bridge would have meant the chief having his cabin you-know-where.

Tony

NoMoss
24th July 2008, 21:43
[QUOTE=RichW;233637]Why is the captains cabin traditionally on the stbd side of the vessel?.
I was told it was so the Capt could keep an eye on a stbd crossing vessel, but there are a few different opinions onboard as usual.[/QUOTE

I thought it was because the ship was steered from the starboard side with the steering oar or board and it was usual for the captain to stand on the starboard side of the bridge and hence his cabin there also.
I sailed on ships where the captain got a bit narked if anyone stood on the starboard bridge wing without his say so.

Duncan112
24th July 2008, 22:42
China Navigation's Miho Mk II and III have the Masters Cabin on the Port side then the offset cranes don't obscure the view from his dayroom (but a full load of boxes will!). If you look in my gallery you will see a photo of Kokopo Chief with this arrangement.

From memory the Masters suite on "British Respect" was on the Starboard side but she was an odball, built by KHI as a one off. The other BP vessels I sailed on had the Masters (and Chiefs) accommodation on the Port side.

With respect to forward vision however, the one vessel I sailed on with centrally mounted cranes (Polynesia, now Saipan Voyager) the helmsmans view of the bow was completely obscured by the crane pedastals - I have seen some ships with centrally mounted cranes with a type of offset bow window arrangement with an offset steering stand to give the helmsman a clear view forward.

John Rogers
24th July 2008, 22:44
Maybe this cabin location began when we had iron men and wooden ships and there was a starboard watch and a port watch,long before we went to three watches and the captain had the starboard watch.

John.

eldersuk
24th July 2008, 23:15
I too recollect that the Captain's cabin was on the starboard side, and in 35 years as an engineer my accommodation was always on the port side but I don't have a clue as to the reason.

Derek

R798780
24th July 2008, 23:53
Cunard's Moss tankers from the Eriksberg yards had the masters cabin on the port side - basically a BP design - with the Mate on the starboard side of the same deck, and the chief engineer directly below the mate.
Brocklebank tonnage that I recall mostly had the master on his own deck below the wheelhouse except the Mahseer class where he was abaft the wheelhouse and the third mate suffered the clunking of the telemotor as the manual wheel above passed amidships. The Black four may have been the same but I never sailed on them.
Lucerna, Energos and Marin all had the masters cabin to starboard. Luxor, with midships accommodation, had the master on a deck of his own below the wheelhouse.

J Boyde
25th July 2008, 10:37
As a mere engineer, I sailed on two USSco ships there the engineers were on the starboard side. On others the mates were on one level and the engineers one below. The Captain had the starboard side and the Chief engineer on the port side.
Jim B

Trevorw
27th July 2008, 16:00
Trust Blue Funnel to be the exception! The Masters accommodation on A Class, D Class and M Class was on the port side - as it also was on the "Glenlyon" class!

DAVELECKIE
27th July 2008, 16:38
From memory all the BP Tankers I sailed on had the Masters cabin on the port side, Mate starboard side.
Also from memory Chief Eng deck below tended to vary but was mainly Starboard side.
Dave

surfaceblow
27th July 2008, 18:46
The T 2's that I have been on the Captains Quarters were on the Port Side and the Chief Engineer was on the Starboard side. All of the other ships that I sailed on the Captain as been on the Stbd side.

Trader
28th July 2008, 01:35
Trust Blue Funnel to be the exception! The Masters accommodation on A Class, D Class and M Class was on the port side - as it also was on the "Glenlyon" class!

From my memory the Masters cabin on the "Bellerophon" and "Astyanax", both A Class ships, went right across the forepart under the Bridge.

Trader.

stein
28th July 2008, 08:21
John Rogers suggests this (a few postings back): "Maybe this cabin location began when we had iron men and wooden ships and there was a starboard watch and a port watch, long before we went to three watches and the captain had the starboard watch."
In the ships in the period I know something about: trading deepwater sailing ships, 1850 - 1930, the captain did not do watches, port watch belonged to the first mate, starboard to the second. On those ships, btw, the captain slept on the starboard side, he had his office on the starboard side, and he ate on the starboard side of the table. Since he was "master next to God," maybe there was a biblical connection:sweat:? Regards, Stein.

Bill Davies
28th July 2008, 08:39
TrevorW
Quote:Trust Blue Funnel to be the exception! The Masters accommodation on A Class, D Class and M Class was on the port side - as it also was on the "Glenlyon" class! :Unquote
I am afraid you are mistaken. The Masters accommodation on the class you mention went right across the forepart under the Bridge.

R651400
28th July 2008, 08:57
Trust Blue Funnel to be the exception! The Masters accommodation on A Class, D Class and M Class was on the port side - as it also was on the "Glenlyon" class!Taking in replies to the opposite above, I can go earlier and say that even pre-war Blue Funnel builds, the master had an entire deck to themselves directly below the bridge.

K urgess
28th July 2008, 13:15
Of the ones I can remember it seems the starboard side rules.
Interestingly on the Baron Wemyss there were two long tables in the saloon. The starboard one was headed by the Master and contained the deck department. The port one was headed by the Chief Engineer and seated the engine department.
On other ships the middle large circular table was usually the Master's but seated heads of departments and any important passengers. The other small tables were mixed departments.

Trevorw
28th July 2008, 16:15
From my memory the Masters cabin on the "Bellerophon" and "Astyanax", both A Class ships, went right across the forepart under the Bridge.

Trader.

Yes they did, but there was a door onto the deck on the Port side into his dayroom. His bedroom was on the starboard side with only a door from the dayroom.

Trader
28th July 2008, 19:05
Yes they did, but there was a door onto the deck on the Port side into his dayroom. His bedroom was on the starboard side with only a door from the dayroom.

Trevor,

go tohttp://www.rhiw.com and click on Blue Funnel then go to Ships plans "A" Boats.

His day room was on the starboard side, bedroom in the middle and bathroom on port side.


Trader

Bill Davies
28th July 2008, 19:22
Alec,
Looks like the Master was the only one who did not benefit from the modification.
Bill

Bill Davies
28th July 2008, 20:24
Alec,
Many thanks for bringing the rhiw site to my attention. I was just reminiscing about the 'D' class with the Bosuns House on top of the Seamans along with the Lifeboats. For the life of me I don't know how we ever worked up there as you could hardly 'swing a cat'. Last one was 'Antenor' 50 years ago.

Bill

jimmys
28th July 2008, 21:52
I was on the Antenor as a fifth engineer in August 1965. My cabin was right outside the officers bog. A wonderful position. I dont think she had been de-passengerised at the time but I am not sure. The second engineer and the chief were along the alleyway from me. The senior lecky was there as well.
A lot of the ships were not carrying passengers at the time even though there were cabins.

regards
jimmys

Bill Davies
28th July 2008, 22:02
The 'D' Class you will all recall had lino tiles inside accommodation. A big improvement on painted 'Red Deck'. PROGRESS!!


For the non BF viewers you may wonder why Jimmy/Pat and I are calling ships like 'Antenor' and 'Ajax' a 'D' boat. They were of the 'D' class.

Trader
29th July 2008, 00:49
Alec,
Many thanks for bringing the rhiw site to my attention. I was just reminiscing about the 'D' class with the Bosuns House on top of the Seamans along with the Lifeboats. For the life of me I don't know how we ever worked up there as you could hardly 'swing a cat'. Last one was 'Antenor' 50 years ago.

Bill

Pleased to see that you like the rhiw site Bill, it is very interesting to anyone who sailed in the China boats.

I never sailed on any of the "D" class but have just had a look at a photo of the "Dolius" and see what you mean about "swinging a cat".

Alec.

jimmys
29th July 2008, 10:10
I sailed on three D Boats, Antenor, Dolius and Achilles and I can confirm the Masters cabin was under the bridge. I was 5/E and 4/E. We entered the engineers alleyway from aft on the prom deck and as I have said my cabin was at the engineers toilet. We did not use the deck above much and you were probably only up there to sign on. The engine access was through the toilet/changing room.
Space was at a premium on those ships the deck was full of equipment, hatches,derricks,winches,contactor houses. The seaman were forever at wires, blocks, ropes etc. Everything was worked hard. I will say even though our cabins were small they were very well fitted. Complaints about accommodation on those ships was unheard off.
Very nice ships.

regards
jimmys

Bill Davies
29th July 2008, 10:30
All above,
The decks were cramped to such an extent on top of sailors house and iwo of Bosuns House that the topping lift bitts were at right angles to the lead block which facilitated the initial making up ( two round turns beneath the lip - three above and two cross turns) to be lead through the bitts.

muldonaich
29th July 2008, 14:59
every ship i ever sailed on if my memory serves me right the old mans cabin was on the starboard side brgds kev.

Ghost
18th August 2008, 02:15
On Blue Funnel with Masters accommodation across the deck, which side did he have his bunk on?

muldonaich
18th August 2008, 08:56
On Blue Funnel with Masters accommodation across the deck, which side did he have his bunk on?bet you it was port side kev.

Brian Locking
18th August 2008, 10:25
Take a look at the 'A' Class Plans submitted by 'Trader'.
The masters bedroom was indeed on the PORT side.

Bill Davies
19th August 2008, 19:37
Yes, I seem to remember the for'd Port side of the Boat Deck and for'd stbd side of the Prom Deck (Ch.Eng) was out of bounds before 0800 and after lunch. This of course varied on the P & H (Steam) class as the Bosun may just have you working iwo the Ch.Engs cabin if he was negligent in'blowing tubes'. Usually the Engine room did not make the mistake twice.

Pat Kennedy
19th August 2008, 20:42
You will I am sure Bill. recall the deck boy accomodation on that class. Right beneath a winch, and on the other side of a thin bulkhead from the tally clerks office. Sleep was not possible in places like Singapore where they worked cargo all night.
Pat

jmcg
20th August 2008, 17:10
Pat

Not only were the Deck Boys affected. All the "sailors" accommodation suffered from continuous cargo working. There were winches to work Nos 4 and 5 holds over the sailor's house. To make matters worse you could also hear the "contactor house" noise - i.e. each contact making. And feel the heat from the contactor house midship just beneath the ladder at No 5. hold.

Did you ever get a "midnight knock" from that pufter tally clerk known as SPANGLES in Port Swettenham. He was known for that sort of thing.

The run ashore to Toby's Bar or the Ritz was a welcome relief!

BW

J.

Bill Davies
20th August 2008, 20:05
Now, now John, behave yourself.

Remember what OB taught you.

Brgds

Bill

Pat Kennedy
20th August 2008, 21:02
Pat

Not only were the Deck Boys affected. All the "sailors" accommodation suffered from continuous cargo working. There were winches to work Nos 4 and 5 holds over the sailor's house. To make matters worse you could also hear the "contactor house" noise - i.e. each contact making. And feel the heat from the contactor house midship just beneath the ladder at No 5. hold.

Did you ever get a "midnight knock" from that pufter tally clerk known as SPANGLES in Port Swettenham. He was known for that sort of thing.

The run ashore to Toby's Bar or the Ritz was a welcome relief!

BW

J.

No thank God, that would have been the last straw, although Johnny Lynas leered at me on the Empress of Britain once, and scared the hell out of me.
Pat

R781128
20th September 2008, 20:35
As a master it did help somewhat to be able to look out forward and to starboard from ones cabin if perhaps wanting to keep an 'eye' on things without appearing to intimidate less experienced or perhaps less competent officers with long spells leaning on the bridge taffrail.

seaman ini
31st October 2008, 14:55
Nice topic, but seems no one is continuing it.

Yup, most ship i was on board, the captain's state room is always on the starboard side.
But some are sleeping on the bridge......(Jester)

tankerman2
31st October 2008, 15:06
Strange when you try to remember cabin positions. All the BP tankers I sailed on had the old mans cabin on the starboard side, one deck above the chiefs cabin.
The mates cabin was on the port side, one deck above the 2/E.
If I remember my cabin (as 4/E) faced aft from the central accom block. This was the Diplomat, but she was built in France so maybe that was the reason why. Long time ago now mayme I got it wrong.

Pat Hughes
31st October 2008, 15:25
Strange when you try to remember cabin positions. All the BP tankers I sailed on had the old mans cabin on the starboard side, one deck above the chiefs cabin.
The mates cabin was on the port side, one deck above the 2/E.
If I remember my cabin (as 4/E) faced aft from the central accom block. This was the Diplomat, but she was built in France so maybe that was the reason why. Long time ago now mayme I got it wrong.

Spent more nights on the Chart Room settee than I care to remember.

muldonaich
31st October 2008, 22:03
did you not trust oow pat ??

Pat Hughes
31st October 2008, 23:14
You could say that.

Paul Baxter
16th November 2008, 09:00
From the replies their are differences from Company to company.

In relation to Blue Funnel go to web site www.rhiw.com there there is under Blue Funnel ships plans for :a"class and their last "super "P" class plans.

Masters accomodation was in the middle and stbd side.

Bedroom in the middle and day room on Stbd side.

Cap'n Pete
16th November 2008, 20:02
In my 4 decades at sea, I've never known the captain's cabin to be anywhere else except on the starboard side. This makes my cabin easily locatable by non-crew as I've found to my cost. I've never heard of any pirates who attacked the chief engineers cabin by mistake!

tunatownshipwreck
17th November 2008, 00:33
I've been on over 1000 ships (mostly as a visitor) and the captain's cabin was always starboard, just as the RO was most often portside on the same deck.

Bill Davies
17th November 2008, 09:20
I've been on over 1000 ships (mostly as a visitor) and the captain's cabin was always starboard, just as the RO was most often portside on the same deck.

Don't know about that. I don't think it applies with the same certainty.
I think many 'Sparkies' will agree they were stuck anywhere as an afterthought. That is meant in the nicest way.

Ron Stringer
17th November 2008, 10:12
Was on the starboard side more often than anywhere else on the ships that I sailed on, but Bill is correct in that there was no pattern to it and, not being a member of any onboard 'department' there was no reason to stable us alongside any crowd of shipmates. Not being part of such a 'department' (and often not even being an employee of the shipowner) there was no one to fight our corner when the accommodation was being planned. By the time the R/O joined the ship, everything was cut and dried. As long as we were in reasonable distance of the radio room and could reach it within the specified maximum time, 'anywhere that they could stick us' was an appropriate description of some locations that I have seen.

K urgess
17th November 2008, 13:16
I seem to have been all over the place.
3 starboard
7 port
7 somewhere around the middle between mates or between mates and engineers.
Plus a few I can't remember [=P]

billyboy
17th November 2008, 13:32
I have never sailed deep water. But, on the small ships i was on the captains cabin was always on the port side

Bill Davies
17th November 2008, 17:51
Just a thought.
On one of the NBC ships I was Master of there was only two people lived amidship. The Sparkie and the Master. The Master directly below the Bridge and the Sparks below the Master.
Yes, go on, I can anticipate what posts will follow this one.

mike N
17th November 2008, 18:24
Same on my last ship, Captains cabin full width of midships accommodation below bridge, me Sparks ,stbd side below that, plus the three mates . Rest of them aft with the Doxford(Thumb) !

K urgess
18th November 2008, 12:35
Funnily enough I never found that my cabin appeared to be an afterthought.
Usually higher up the ladder than the Captain and closer to work.
Maybe too close sometimes.
Staying in yer bunk to take GKL traffic list on a cold morning was maybe taking lying down on the job to extremes. [=P]

Brad
20th November 2008, 13:44
It was always explained to me that if there was going to be a collision from another ship, then it would most likely occur on the port side, and therefore the capt would be safe......

Always sounded like ******** to me but i heard it more than once......

Steve Woodward
20th November 2008, 16:42
Funnily enough I never found that my cabin appeared to be an afterthought.
Usually higher up the ladder than the Captain and closer to work.
Maybe too close sometimes.
Staying in yer bunk to take GKL traffic list on a cold morning was maybe taking lying down on the job to extremes. [=P]

Kris,
After your trip on the Satucket you should have asked for one on the Shabonnee, the view out the R/O's cabin was great, best view of a whistle diaphragm I have ever seen, close too !!!
For some reason the RO, who's name I forget, hated fog more than us mere mates (Jester)

K urgess
20th November 2008, 18:44
The best ones were the steam ships with the whistle facing the sparkies cabin, Steve.
Mind you the Satucket cabin had two ways out. One through the radio room and the other straight out onto the aft of that deck.
Port side aft, same deck as el Capitano.
Gave me an excuse to spend more time in the bar. [=P]

R651400
25th November 2008, 10:00
,but Bill is correct in that there was no pattern to it and, not being a member of any onboard 'department' there was no reason to stable us alongside any crowd of shipmates.
Blue Funnel until my departure, in their post war builds placed their radio office and 1st R/O's cabin on the port side below the bridge deck. I can only speak for BF but it would be interesting to hear from other R/O direct employ companies eg Reardon Smith.

sidsal
25th November 2008, 12:34
Although not strictly pertinent to the position of the captain's cabin I pass on an anecdote. Brocklebanks pre WW2 launched a new ship and after trials from the Clyde she sailed with a senior master in command.
Upon her return to Liverpool the deck and engine superintendents went aboard to interview the master hoping to have information on her handling capabilities and behaviour in a seaway etc.
However all they got was a complaint from him about his bath being placed athwartships instead of fore-and-aft. He said the water slopped out when the ship rolled.
I can well imagine this attitude in some of the old masters in Brocks !

Thenavigator4
7th September 2009, 18:16
Whew, what a stir! However, all Buries Markes ships from the 60's had the old mans cabin on the starboard side. Funny though, the next deck down Mate - Starboard 2nd Mate -Port, cadets and 3rd mate were all port side. All the engineers were starboard side, does this mean engineers were superior to mates and apps?

Derek Roger
7th September 2009, 22:28
On all the Brocklebank vessels I sailed on Captan was Stbd and Chief Engineer Portside .
The next deck down were all the engineers and electrician on the Stbdside; with the mates ; sparks on the Portside. QMs were a deck below on the Port side and apprentices on the Stbdside or sometimes up on the boat deck in a separate accomodation .
Stewards were also on the Portside along with chippy .


Regards Derek

Derek Roger
7th September 2009, 22:34
Moss Tankers however had all the engineers and oilers Port and Old Man ; mates and deck hands Stbd .

Derek

Macphail
7th September 2009, 22:43
I've been on over 1000 ships (mostly as a visitor) and the captain's cabin was always starboard, just as the RO was most often portside on the same deck.

The chief engineer was normally on the port side and on the same deck as the captain, with similar accommodation.
R/O was normally on a deck below, aft against the funnel.

John.

sidsal
8th September 2009, 20:36
Many years ago when I was in Brocklebanks a master told me of a new ship in the company (don't remeber which or when but it was probably pre ww2) which arrived back in the uk from her maiden voyage.
When the marine super etc came aboard and asked the master if he was pleased with the ship they found him very disgruntllted.
On asking why he was displeased he said there was a serious fault in his accommodation as the bath had been fitted athwartships instead of fore and aft and the water slopped out both ends when she rolled !!

tunatownshipwreck
9th September 2009, 01:11
It is not my intention to tell anybody what they saw, I accept your own recollections as you state them, but I remember more ships than not, mostly being Japanese-built bulkers, on the boat deck having the engineers in rank from aft to fore on the port side, and the same scheme for the deck officers on the starboard side. On the next deck up would be the captain on the starboard side, with the R/O and the RR on the port side, maybe with a captain's lounge between them.
This doesn't mean I didn't see R/Os and RRs in other spots, and on a few ships I saw the Captain's quarters off the bridge.

Greyman
25th September 2009, 11:40
After following this thread for a while and thinking back to my limited time on the "City boats " in the 70s and early 80s , I would go along with the starboard side theory ,but was there also not a bias to the starboard side for the actual bridge layout with both the older style chartroom and modern style chart table both being located on the starboard side of the bridge .
The telegraph as well ,was allways located on the starbord side of the bridge ,even on the more modern designs with electronic telegraph or direct bridge control it was allways on the starboard side of the relevant control panel .
Regards, Mark

Tony Crompton
25th September 2009, 12:38
The telegraph as well ,was allways located on the starbord side of the bridge ,
Regards, Mark

Always thought City Boats were "Schooner Rigged".

In Brocklebanks there was a telegraph on both sides !!

Tony

MARINEJOCKY
25th September 2009, 14:18
As usual it is a very simple answer, The Chief Engineer wanted the port-side.

graymay
8th December 2009, 11:13
This one has probably been asked (and answered) before, however I am not certain of the answer. Anyway, here goes.

Why is the Skippers cabin always on the Starboard side (well 99% of the time anyway) and the Chief on the Port side?
I vaguely remember being given a 'resonable' explanation, although I cannot remember.

Kind regards

Graham

Peter4447
8th December 2009, 11:21
Hi Graham
You will find a long thread on this one in The Bridge under the heading Captains Cabin Std Side?
Regards
Peter4447(Thumb)

MikeK
9th December 2009, 09:11
Hi Graham, in case you don't feel inclined to go searching, it is on that side as the starbord bow is the side his ship has to give way to crossing traffic. He can give an occasional look out the windows to make sure that his watckeeper upstairs is doing his job properly. Presumably the chief is next door as he gets lonely easily ! (==D)

Mike

Ron Stringer
9th December 2009, 09:24
You will see many comments by looking through the thread referred to by Peter. Click on this link

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=20136

to see the most recent posting.

However it might be better if the Moderators could move your posting to the original thread, rather than your starting a new thread like this.

benjidog
10th December 2009, 00:04
Good idea Ron - have merged the threads and left a 3 day redirection notice for anyone looking at the new thread.

ray bloomfield
10th December 2009, 00:45
Hi Graham, in case you don't feel inclined to go searching, it is on that side as the starbord bow is the side his ship has to give way to crossing traffic. He can give an occasional look out the windows to make sure that his watckeeper upstairs is doing his job properly. Presumably the chief is next door as he gets lonely easily ! (==D)

Mike

In that case I'd rather be on the port side so if she did get thumped the collision would be on the opposite side to me!

Dickyboy
10th December 2009, 06:44
I think that the Captains cabin was virtually always on the stbd side so that he (The Captain) could always find it. :o

ray bloomfield
10th December 2009, 16:13
Dickyboy

Are you insinuating that some Captains were in a somewhat disturbed state of mind some times, ie under the influence of something? I dont believe it!

Dickyboy
11th December 2009, 03:26
Dickyboy

Are you insinuating that some Captains were in a somewhat disturbed state of mind some times, ie under the influence of something? I dont believe it!
Good lord no, I wasn't insinuating anything like that, perish the thought!.... :o But if the Masters cabin is in virtually the same place on every ship, then it does remove the rather embarrasing situation of the Master having to ask directions when boarding. As we all know Masters don't like to have to ask for infomation, they expect to be given it. Probably the reason a Cadet was given the job of taking the Masters Baggage, and his and her luggage, to his cabin was so that he could follow without having to ask. (Jester)

surfaceblow
11th December 2009, 03:52
I always thought it was in the same place on every ship that I was on so that the Port Officials and other Pirates could find the Captain's Office with out an escort.(==D)

RayJordandpo
11th December 2009, 17:26
Ain't that the truth!
With all this political correctness I can envisage the authorities insisting a notice displayed on the master's cabin door.
PIRATES
Please be advised that if a firearm is to be used a hot work permit must be obtained before discharging the weapon. If it is the intention to use only swords or knives a cold work permit will suffice. Permits are available in the chief officers cabin. Please follow the signs.

ray bloomfield
12th December 2009, 00:41
Talking of firearms which we wasn't, when the ISPS came into force it states that no firearms are allowed onboard,
We were in Dordrecht and the immigration came on board I said to them that in compliance with the ISPS etc etc ( hypotheticaly) I could refuse them access while they still had thier guns. If I did this what would be the outcome?
Just thern an e/r alarm flashed up and off I went to sort it.
I came back and one of them was on the phone to his boss (??).
The outcome......
If I refused to allow firearms on board as is my right they would go ashore.
Thier rules state thier gun must never leave thier person so they could not lock them in thier motor.

I would be heavily penalised for refusing them access.
But I could also be penalised for failing to comply with the ISPS.
Definetly a no win situation(Cloud)

Billieboy
12th December 2009, 09:37
Talking of firearms which we wasn't, when the ISPS came into force it states that no firearms are allowed onboard,
We were in Dordrecht and the immigration came on board I said to them that in compliance with the ISPS etc etc ( hypotheticaly) I could refuse them access while they still had thier guns. If I did this what would be the outcome?
Just thern an e/r alarm flashed up and off I went to sort it.
I came back and one of them was on the phone to his boss (??).
The outcome......
If I refused to allow firearms on board as is my right they would go ashore.
Thier rules state thier gun must never leave thier person so they could not lock them in thier motor.

I would be heavily penalised for refusing them access.
But I could also be penalised for failing to comply with the ISPS.
Definetly a no win situation(Cloud)

FYI, some years ago, in the eighties I think, a bunch of gangsters who had just pulled a blag in Holland, not far from the German border, were well into their getaway trip when they were stopped by an unarmed Dutch Customs officer. The gangsters were not happy with this so shot and killed the Customs officer. A few years later Dutch Customs officers were supplied with side arms.

Thenavigator4
24th January 2010, 22:00
Judging by the pirate situation off Somalia at present, it's time they brought back DEMS!(==D)

Either that or a few well placed grenades seeing as most of the pirates seem to be in inflatables!(A)

Might just deter one or two of them!!!(Cloud)

Ernest

xieriftips
27th January 2010, 21:31
Why is the captains cabin traditionally on the stbd side of the vessel?.
I was told it was so the Capt could keep an eye on a stbd crossing vessel, but there are a few different opinions onboard as usual.

Of the 9 ships I sailed on in BP Tankers, 5 had the Captain's Cabin on the port side, 3 placed it all across the accommodation front & on one it was on the Bridge deck, aft of the Radio Room!http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/images/icons/icon12.gif

M29
28th January 2010, 15:36
Hi All.
Slightly off the thread but some refered to all the characters who came to see the Captain, usually in the hope of a few beers, agents etc. I heard of one Captain who on ringing off engines and seeing the usual culprits tramping up the gangway, would drop his strides and sit on his karzi. As his cabin was invaded, he would shout, "sorry, i'm in here" Embarresed agents etc. would hand him, papers etc to sign, which he did from his seated position, they would clear off as quickly as possible. When the coast was clear, he would grab his golf clubs and go ashore!

Best wishes

Alan

mobi1
7th February 2010, 19:19
slightly off topic but about cabin side(s) ..can anyone confirm that the word POSH actually came from the stamping of P.O.S.H ......for port out starboard home ..........on passenger tickets during the days of "empire" and travel to "IndJa" ...eh what ?

Lancastrian
7th February 2010, 20:35
No - its a myth. See discussion somewhere in the forums.