Tankers in heavy seas

Roy Fox
5th August 2008, 07:04
Any old tanker men (I mean real old, like me) with a reasonable quality B/W photo of a loaded tanker ploughing through heavy seas? Really like to hear from you. Needed for project for grandchildren.

Bill Davies
5th August 2008, 07:12
Roy,

Define really old!

Bill

John Cassels
5th August 2008, 08:15
Roy,

Define really old!

Bill

He's not talking about you , Bill

Frank P
5th August 2008, 10:32
Roy,
Here is a photo of a tanker M/T Hallanger in heavy seas, the photo is not black+ white but the tanker is reasonably old, she was built in 1960.

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=6871

Cheers Frank(Thumb)

albert.s.i
5th August 2008, 10:44
im well passed 82 and like most seamen been in some terrible weather but one trip leaving a place called feringerhavn in greeland in ballast it turned really nasty i was pumpman on the british drummer the mate wanted more ballast to stop the the engine from raceing we were in the north adlantic i had a safty line tied around me and two a.bs holding on to the line on the fly bridge while i opened the tank valves she was only 5000 ton but did the job and started to make way south to the u.k. albert s.i.

d.r.wing
5th August 2008, 16:53
There are a number of photo's of Tankers in heavy weather on this site in the gallery. There must be a lot of pic's around from our time at sea, I didn't own a camera then but well remember Mates and Captains risking life and limb to take dramatic pictures. It was somethig else when that wall of water caught the bow lifting the stern out of the water engine racing and the whole ship shuddering ready to climb the next wave. hope you find the pic's ok.
regards d.r.

K urgess
5th August 2008, 17:02
What sort of tanker, Roy?
This one of mine is not particularly rough and is an all aft tanker but it may give you an idea of what is about in the gallery.
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=35896
Regards
Kris

kewl dude
6th August 2008, 06:54
I swiped this picture off Pierre's site:

http://users.skynet.be/p.woinin/index.html

years ago.

Greg Hayden

calvin
7th August 2008, 17:47
snow bound produtions have a good video dvd called great liners part 14 tankers address snowbound produtions 145 the promenade peacehaven sussex bn10 7hn a good video/dvd to watch as tankers from 1921 to 1975 bp shell esso crossing atlantic in rough weather .

veste
7th August 2008, 18:42
Roy,
Photo of Clymene, Hadley Shipping Co in heavy sea 1969. Taken with Kodak Brownie.
Regards veste.

Roy Fox
8th August 2008, 03:04
Hi Veste. That's great, just what I want. Many thanks.
Roy

Roy Fox
8th August 2008, 03:50
Thanks all you guys for taking the trouble to reply. Your photo Greg, also great. Have downloaded that. Suggestions re gallery will be followed up. Your dvd, Calvin, sounds interesting but a bit far away for me to get from Oz. Maybe get my sister to look into it for me. Re. age! Albert is about the right era, I'm 78. Interested in all your yarns. I have memories of those rough spells, too. Lost a lifeboat in the Aust Bight on passage to Adelaide. Around 1949 I would think. Thanks, again.

KIWI
8th August 2008, 04:19
There is a photo in my gallery of a T3 taking a heavy sea on the beam. Kiwi

jackman
5th May 2009, 18:53
Great pictures. I sailed on three tankers, Thaumastus Argentine Transport and the Imperial Transport. Brings back memories. Getting food from the galley aft,to the saloon mid-ships. Didn't always make it .

Sabastapol
6th May 2009, 14:24
There's one in my gallery Roy, go have a look see!
Sabastapol

Ron Stringer
6th May 2009, 18:51
The ''Regent Pembroke'' had no flying bridge or pipelines above deck, everything went fore and aft via a pipe tunnel down the port side. Worked well when in heavy seas or strong winds but in the tropics was extremely hot, humid and smelly.

Best avoided when wearing whites, as the ladders and other metal objects in the tunnel were rusty in parts and oily in others. Come to think of it, it was not too good for your uniform when in blues.

Unless it was really hazardous, we normally made our way along the deck, rather than down the tunnel when going aft for meals. If you did arrive, at least you weren't covered in sweat and oil/grime. Via the tunnel, when up the Gulf, in the Red Sea or in the Caribbean, you arrived wanting a shower rather than a meal.