Calabar

Ian
8th April 2004, 18:45
CALABAR (8,305 grt.1936) was used on the Tilbury to West Africa service between 1957 and 1962.

davidcalgary
18th January 2006, 06:30
I travelled on the Calabar - a very friendly ship and different from the liners. As I recall, the Calabar & Winebar stopped at Madeira and the liners (Aureol, Apapa & Accra) stopped at Las Palmas?

japottinger
11th April 2006, 17:23
I travelled on the Calabar - a very friendly ship and different from the liners. As I recall, the Calabar & Winebar stopped at Madeira and the liners (Aureol, Apapa & Accra) stopped at Las Palmas?
I did my first trip in MN as 8th Eng on Calabar when she was Umgeni of Bullard King, not by choice as had been shanghaid from Clan Line at time of take over of Union Castle. Shanghaid myself out pretty quick too at end of voyage!
Thanks but no thanks

eldersuk
12th April 2006, 00:07
Calabar and Winneba were just about Elder Dempster's last steamers. They were very popular ships among the navigating and pursering fraternities although maybe not so popular with engineers due to the extreme heat (so I'm told), but being the last steamers, the steam engineers were happy to have ships to sail on. When these ships were sold on the engineers who couldn't or wouldn't adapt to motorships either went to shoreside jobs in the company or packed up and went elsewhere.

Alun Pari Huws
17th April 2006, 17:44
I was born in Lagos in 1958 where my father Gwyn was doing a shore posting as Marine Traffic Manager. I came home with my father and mother (aged 3 months) on the Winneba and have a copy of the Passenger List for 11 Sept 1958. Personnel: Capt A H Perkins, Mate; PWJ Hawkins, Chief; A McCarrick, Purser; J A Day, Doctor; J Caplin, Chief Steward; G Pratt. Itinery was Lagos (Apapa) dept 11 Set, Takoradi 12 Sept, Freetown 15th, Maderia; 21st and London 26th. I am listed as 'Baby Pari Huws'!!!

eldersuk
18th April 2006, 00:23
Alun, I think the only one left out of the personnel you mention is Arthur Day who still joins us for our monthly meetings in Liverpool.
Regards, Derek

ernest williams
22nd April 2006, 00:27
I Remember A Arther Day Fromnotty Ash Ab In The Mountpark Denholms Could This The Same One

eldersuk
27th April 2006, 01:53
Ernest,
This Arthur Day was an Elder Dempster Purser all his time at sea.

Derek

orcades
15th July 2009, 01:00
Calabar and Winneba were just about Elder Dempster's last steamers. They were very popular ships among the navigating and pursering fraternities although maybe not so popular with engineers due to the extreme heat (so I'm told), but being the last steamers, the steam engineers were happy to have ships to sail on. When these ships were sold on the engineers who couldn't or wouldn't adapt to motorships either went to shoreside jobs in the company or packed up and went elsewhere.

Yes they were very hot particularly on the middles by that monster ..compressor with the giant flywheel. but I enjoyed the experience of tending an up and downer ,as an engineer it was an eye opener

alan mason
9th August 2009, 01:02
just to add a bit more to the chat i spent to years in the winneba and can only remeber the good memories the C/E was W.C. Burly 2nd eng norman andrews I was Jnr 3rd Alan Mason known as Perry And Bob murray was snr 3rd
the elect was Peter dwyer. what a team. probian1

Graham the pipe
13th September 2013, 09:38
Did two voyages on her, as a cadet, in '58. Captain 'Paddy' Ralston, C/O Johnny Stott. The former left her at the same time as I did and - coincidentally - our next trip together followed, immediately, with the maiden voyage of the Degema. 'Fell out', at the time, in a BIG way with the latter over a 'mutual attraction' to a female passenger - Audrey Whiteside. {How's that for a memory going back 55 years!} 'Made up' and became good friends when did a State's trip with him C/O and self 3/O, on the Obuasi, in '63. Sadly he died on his first trip as Skipper on, I think, the Perang. He'd radioed the Donga to invite me over for a drink when we docked in Takoradi where he was. When I went aboard was hit with the news that it had JUST happened, instantly, with no pre warning whatsoever.

John Gillespie
13th September 2013, 16:20
Alun, I think the only one left out of the personnel you mention is Arthur Day who still joins us for our monthly meetings in Liverpool.
Regards, Derek

Arthur Day was in the Personnel Dept. when I was in ED's in the 60's
JCG

Donald McGhee
13th September 2013, 23:47
My late Father, Harry McGhee was harbour master in Port Harcourt and also Div Marine Officer in Lagos, Nigerian Marine, retiring in 1956, after serving in W. Africa for 15 years, mainly in Lagos, where I spent the first 5 years of my life.
He served as 3rd mate on Calabar during the war, from March 1941 to January 1942, under William Newton who was her master.
He was also 3rd mate on two other ED ships during the war, Dixcove and Adda, plus several other Merchantmen, all of which were sunk just after he paid off!

Not sure if the Calabar he served on is the one on this thread, as there appears to have been two?

Graham the pipe
14th September 2013, 08:28
My late Father, Harry McGhee was harbour master in Port Harcourt and also Div Marine Officer in Lagos, Nigerian Marine, retiring in 1956, after serving in W. Africa for 15 years, mainly in Lagos, where I spent the first 5 years of my life.
He served as 3rd mate on Calabar during the war, from March 1941 to January 1942, under William Newton who was her master.
He was also 3rd mate on two other ED ships during the war, Dixcove and Adda, plus several other Merchantmen, all of which were sunk just after he paid off!

Not sure if the Calabar he served on is the one on this thread, as there appears to have been two?

'morning to you Donald. Your late father retired from the West African coast one year before I first visited. The Calabar he was on was not the one here, which was the Ballard and King Umtali before being purchased by EDs. There was a 'replacement' Dixcove built for EDs in the early '60s but - to the best of my knowledge - the name Adda died with the ship's demise.

Donald McGhee
15th September 2013, 05:14
'morning to you Donald. Your late father retired from the West African coast one year before I first visited. The Calabar he was on was not the one here, which was the Ballard and King Umtali before being purchased by EDs. There was a 'replacement' Dixcove built for EDs in the early '60s but - to the best of my knowledge - the name Adda died with the ship's demise.

Thanks for that Graham. Yes, his dis.book names Calabar, Adda and Dixcove, so all ED ships, but earlier obviously, as Adda was I believe torpedoed, as was Dixcove.

Graham the pipe
15th September 2013, 07:24
Thanks for that Graham. Yes, his dis.book names Calabar, Adda and Dixcove, so all ED ships, but earlier obviously, as Adda was I believe torpedoed, as was Dixcove.

Forgive my curiosity/nosiness but did your career 'echo' his?

g h ryan
15th September 2013, 10:08
Forgive my curiosity/nosiness but did your career 'echo' his?

Calabar 3 was a small [ 1932 gross ] feeder passenger ship built to transport mailship passengers to the Port Harcourt , Calabar etc.

During WW 2 she carried pass from Nigeria to South Africa for R & R.

She used to berth at a small wharf on the seaward side of the main Lagos Quay where I saw her in 1953.

Graham the pipe
15th September 2013, 10:31
Calabar 3 was a small [ 1932 gross ] feeder passenger ship built to transport mailship passengers to the Port Harcourt , Calabar etc.

During WW 2 she carried pass from Nigeria to South Africa for R & R.

She used to berth at a small wharf on the seaward side of the main Lagos Quay where I saw her in 1953.

Thanks Gerry. Should have looked first at who'd written these 'facts', as my immediate reaction, on reading, was 'what's that got to do with my 'echoing' query'?