Single Point Mooring

Brian Locking
7th September 2008, 18:23
Presently working on two claims which involved SPM contact with two of our tankers in the Gulf. Do any of our experienced Master members have any views on approaching SPMs.

Brian

Derek Roger
7th September 2008, 19:38
I think it is your tankers which contacted the SPM Brian ? Not the way you propose it .

Was their no SPM docking master at those ports ? Did you have tugs ?

In Saint John a docking master is provided who is well versed with the tides winds and vessel characteristics .

Contact can be expensive and I was involved some years ago as a salvage surveyor investigating a claim .
The issue is not usually the SPM so much as the integrity of sub sea hose itself and moorings which run up a big bill .

Regards Derek

Brian Locking
7th September 2008, 19:45
The latest case rested in a loading in Zirku Island where the Pilot (a Trainee) was berthing one of the VLCCs (19.2mtrs topping off ex Ras Tanura) and got to windward and thence drifted over the Buoy. The senior Pilot was for'd. The attending Tug was called over at the last minute from Stbd to Port and put one hell on dent in the Port shoulder. Course it is all our fault.

Derek Roger
8th September 2008, 01:05
I understand your feelings . Derek

Brian Locking
8th September 2008, 10:39
Derek,
The cost of repairing the dent fades into insignificance when alogside the claim for damage and 'off hire' of the buoy.
Imagine, ship to windward (NE) of buoy and attending tug to windward of ship. I would not read about it. Pilot three months earlier Second mate in VELA

Roys1
8th September 2008, 10:53
Just surfed onto your thread about SBM contact, took me back 35 years which I always recall when things go wrong. I had just started training as berthing/loading Master in Forcados, Nigeria. Pilot came in a bit fast and didn't get prompt astern required. Bulb went under the buoy at high speed, snapping chains, hoses etc with lots of damage to buoy and ship. Most of us watching went into the usual mantra " When in danger or in doubt, run in circles scream and shout" !
The pilot was classic however, among all the excitement he came on the radio in a dry humour with " mother told me there would be days like this" which put it all into context. No body hurt, just some steel and pride a bit dented.
I always think about when things are going wrong - it works well !

Roy
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R781128
20th September 2008, 20:21
There is always a risk approaching,using and even departing from SBM's that are often underestimated.

Some suggestions.
1. Thorough Briefing with all concerned before approach.Test winches.
2. Experienced pilots on both Bow and bridge.
3. Approach into wind & tide/current
4. Test engines astern before approach.
5. Approach slow,very slow for last 2-300 metres and never allow vessel to approach faster that it can be stopped
6. Use an Osprey berthing aid wherever possible
7. Use a starboard bow tug if available for alignment where currents are tricky.
8. Use a braking tug or AHTS on stern

Please send private E Mail if you need more info or an 'expert witness'

B Rgds

Wallyh
27th September 2008, 04:51
We have a port in New Zealand fhrough which Iron Sands are exported which consists of an SBM moored abolut 1.3 miles offshore. The buoy is open to the prevailing winds current and swell, because of the specialist nature of the cargo only one ship calls at the buoy, she is 150,000TDWT as she was built in the early 1990's she is severely underpowered, you cannot get astern until the prop has stopped rotating and a few other restrictions which can be lived with in the normal course of events but not really wanted for berthing a large ship on an open water buoy.

However the berth has none of the nice to haves mentioned above, there is a single pilot, no tugs of any description either for the bow or or static tow, the pilot who berths her carries out berthing in darkness and in what I expect in weather most ports would call marginal for the operation with all the bells and whistles let alone without them.

The Pilot who carries out the berthings does so with aplomb and apparent ease, I saw him carry it out on numerous occasions whilst I was Harbourmaster for the area. Can give you his name if you want an expert witness/ trainer

Wallyh

Andrew Price
1st October 2008, 22:04
Worked as a Berthing Master (or SBM Terminal Rep.!!!) at the then 6 x SBM Juaymah Offshore Terminal, Saudi Arabia in the late 70's.

It was ARMACO's policy that ALL Tankers regardless of size or condition (ballast or partially loaded) be stopped dead in the water at least one mile away from the SBM before approaching the Buoy.

This was intended to stop too fast an approach to the SPM and incidents such as over-riding as described by Brian Locking.

Final approach speed was general less than 1/10th. of a knot

Andy Price

Bill Davies
1st October 2008, 22:32
Worked as a Berthing Master (or SBM Terminal Rep.!!!) at the then 6 x SBM Juaymah Offshore Terminal, Saudi Arabia in the late 70's.

It was ARMACO's policy that ALL Tankers regardless of size or condition (ballast or partially loaded) be stopped dead in the water at least one mile away from the SBM before approaching the Buoy.

This was intended to stop too fast an approach to the SPM and incidents such as over-riding as described by Brian Locking.

Final approach speed was general less than 1/10th. of a knot

Andy Price


Andy,

Loaded at Juayma dozens of times and I do not recall berthing as you describe it. Final approach speed less than 1/10 of a knot??

jerome morris
2nd October 2008, 16:03
I can remember the approach to the Bouy on the east coast of Panama. We also approached from a dead in the water 1/2 mile away and always into the wind ( which wasn't much anyway) And never a tug.

Pat Hughes
2nd October 2008, 16:25
I can remember the approach to the Bouy on the east coast of Panama. We also approached from a dead in the water 1/2 mile away and always into the wind ( which wasn't much anyway) And never a tug.

What about the 'Static tow'

jerome morris
2nd October 2008, 22:25
Static Tow?

Bill Davies
5th October 2008, 13:06
The tug employed to maintain minimum pull at stern to keep you off the buoy.

Pat Hughes
6th October 2008, 09:02
That is what I meant!

garry Norton
9th February 2012, 19:43
Scapa Flow has SPM's and you can not touch them with a ship,SBM's can be touched gently.SPM's if the ship touches them you cause damage as they are attached to the sea floor. They are not generally in use at world wide terminals. Suggest you ask Flotta Oil Terminal on their construction as it is a long time since I was there.

chadburn
9th February 2012, 19:54
Unfortunatly Garry this was another "corrupted" forum as three of the contributors were one of the same person.