Name of a Book

John Rogers
8th July 2005, 01:28
I know many of you senior seafarers did a lot of reading on those long voyages back when there were wooden ships and iron men, (well maybe not that long ago). One book that was very popular among the crew of one ship I was on stands out in my memory and I just cannot recall the name of the book. I will give a little of the plot/story so that maybe some one will come up with the name so I can buy it and read it again.
It was about a German Armed Raider, running the blockade and sailing around the world sinking ships of all nations. The captain was a German aristocrat and treated all his captives in a decent way removing them from their ship before sinking it. When he would have too many prisoners onboard he would place them on another German ship and send them to the Fatherland. His ship the raider was a large cargo ship in disguise and could change within hours from one configuration to another by using plywood and galvanize sheeting. The author threw in some factual events to make it a good read such as murdering a couple of radio men on a station on one of the islands around New Zealand. The ship could also plant mines in allied sealanes,and had many guns and torpedo tubes mounted. Now fellows Iím going back 58 years to a book I read on my first trip so donít give me a hard time over my memory.
John Rogers

mcook
8th July 2005, 03:32
Don't know the book, but the two German 'Q' boats that come to mind are the
Atlantis and Pinguin. My father was a marine on HMS Cornwall which sank the Pinguin in the South Atlantic in 1941.

Doug Rogers
8th July 2005, 03:58
I can remember reading the tale of the "Atlantis" as a lad (Capt Rogge?? or something similar). In some respects she fits part of the story but I dont think she ever did much in the NZ area. She ended up refitting at Kergulen Island and I think was finally sunk by a British cruiser (HMS Dorset??shire??) Part of her crew was picked up by U boat and some of her lifeboats were towed towards Germany before being embarked on other U boats. Quite a tale but alas, another senior moment...have no idea of what the book was called!!.

trotterdotpom
8th July 2005, 04:32
Fortunately John I read that book before I was totally hooked on gin. It is "The Sea Chase" by Andrew Geer.

It was also filmed in 1955 and starred the great John Wayne, giving the Injuns a few months respite, and the yummy Lana Turner.

Out of curiosity, I looked the movie up and found that the Kapitaen was called Karl Ehrlich. During the making of the movie, the Duke went swimming at Hawaii and got and ear infection. For most of the film they could only film him from one side as the other half of his head was all swollen.

John T.

Bruce Carson
8th July 2005, 04:33
You may be thinking of Count Felix von Luckner, known as the "Sea Devil" and his ship the Seeadler. A raider known for his courteous treatment of prisoners, his apparent chivalry made him a celebrity after the war.
There were a number of books published detailing his exploits and there are websites online which recount his wartime experiences.
The Lowell Thomas book, "Count Luckner, the Sea Devil" (Doubleday, Doran & Co., New York, 1928) seems to have been the most popular as it still shows up quite often on online used booksellers' lists.

A short article on his war service:
http://www.yeoldeeditor.com/vonluckner.htm
Bibliography:
http://ahoy.tk-jk.net/macslog/BibliographyforCountFelix.html

trotterdotpom
8th July 2005, 04:49
A famous German armed merchant raider in the Australian area is 'Kormoran'. In 1941, she was sunk by HMAS Sydney off the West Australian coast, near Geraldton with the loss of 60 men (317 survived).

The only trace of HMAS Sydney was a couple of empty lifeboats - all 645 crew were lost. The survivors of 'Kormoran' claimed that 'Sydney' was sunk by them, but there is a suspician that she was actually sunk by a Japanese submarine lurking in the area for a rendezvous with 'Kormoran'.

Loads on the internet about the incident - Australia's greatest naval loss.

Doug Rogers
8th July 2005, 05:02
A famous German armed merchant raider in the Australian area is 'Kormoran'. In 1941, she was sunk by HMAS Sydney off the West Australian coast, near Geraldton with the loss of 60 men (317 survived).

The only trace of HMAS Sydney was a couple of empty lifeboats - all 645 crew were lost. The survivors of 'Kormoran' claimed that 'Sydney' was sunk by them, but there is a suspician that she was actually sunk by a Japanese submarine lurking in the area for a rendezvous with 'Kormoran'.

Loads on the internet about the incident - Australia's greatest naval loss.

I believe that they have now very much narrowed down the area where the HMAS Sydney did sink, perhaps one day in the not too distant future we may know a lot more. The theories and rumours have abounded for many years, perhaps soon they will all be laid to rest.

Piero43
8th July 2005, 09:11
I can remember reading the tale of the "Atlantis" as a lad (Capt Rogge?? or something similar). In some respects she fits part of the story but I dont think she ever did much in the NZ area. She ended up refitting at Kergulen Island and I think was finally sunk by a British cruiser (HMS Dorset??shire??) Part of her crew was picked up by U boat and some of her lifeboats were towed towards Germany before being embarked on other U boats. Quite a tale but alas, another senior moment...have no idea of what the book was called!!.

Yes, the book about the "Atlantis" was by Capt. Rogge. Its title was, in original, "Schiff 16" ("Nave 16" in italian), from the code number given to "Atlantis" by the German Kriegsmarine. I have no idea of what the english title was ( "Ship 16" ??).
I think anyway that it's not the book looked for by John, since the "Atlantis" never reached the NZ. Most likely the story was about "Penguin" or "Kormoran".
Piero

John Rogers
8th July 2005, 13:43
Thank you so much for the answers to my post on German Raiders. As to the Movie Sea Chase, sorry that was not the one. I will check out the other leads and see where they take me. Piero you are correct about the numbering of the raiders although there was a number 45 they never had more than 10. Based on my hunt for the book I found a little history about the ships, there was 10 to begin with 5 were destroyed on their first cruise in the Atlantic,1 blew up in the harbor at Yokohama,another was damaged in the English channel and returned to Germany leaving the three known as the Penguin, Kormoran and the Orion, formerly the Hamburg-America Line Kurmark 7,021 tons. The Orion made it to the New Zealand coast and laid the mines in the passage between Great Mercury and Cuvier island. The first victim to hit the mines was the Niagara 13,415 tons bound from Auckland for Suva, sank in the fairway between Bream Head and Moko Hinau, later H.M.N.Z.S. Puriri struck a mine sinking her immediately.
Thanks again fro the replies, just goes to show what a great crew we have on this wonderful website. If I trace down the book I will let you know.
John.

John Rogers
8th July 2005, 14:04
Bruce, I checked on the websites you provided and that is the person the book was written around. The book in question could be the Sea Devil or Sea Wolf,as I mentioned the book was Fiction with a few actual events thrown it to juice it up. Now Im off to Amazon to see if I can find the book. Many thanks for the lead. John.

John Rogers
8th July 2005, 14:16
Well I found the book I think. They had one left in stock,it must be in demand because its selling for $22.00 dollars for a soft cover.
I copied the review while I was there.

Unbelievable Sea Yarn!, July 6, 2003
Reviewer: Ammons, Jason D. (Japan) - See all my reviews
As a sailor in the Western Pacific, I wouldn't dream of making up a sea story this over the top. This is simply put, the most amazing tale of the sea I have ever read. Count Von Luckner ran away to sea as a youth, hunted kangaroo in Australia, served in the Mexican Army, was a professional wrestler,...oh yeah... he also took charge of a highly modified schooner in WWI and laid waist to Allied shipping between America and Europe. He recieved Germany's highest war-time awards as well as being decorated by his advesaries and recieving a humanitarian award from the Pope. A truly incredible man who lived in a dynamic time. A must read for any lovers of adventure, the sea, or World War I.

John Rogers
8th July 2005, 20:56
Well I can now put this quest and this thread to rest. After spending a lot of time reviewing books and spending money I have found the book. Doug you don't have as many cobwebs on your memory as you thought,it was the book called 'The Cruise of the German Raider Atlantis, also Piero you were right about the book, as to reaching NZ that could be my memory playing tricks as I have read so many articles about the German Raiders. Bottom line I now have both books on their way to me. Thanks one and all.
John.

John Rogers
8th July 2005, 21:16
While researching for this book I also read that a film was made of it called "Under 10 Flags" a Dino de Laurentis film. So I'm off again looking for the movie.
JR

Doug Rogers
9th July 2005, 02:12
Good luck with the chase and enjoy the film when you get it!!

robbo
9th July 2005, 03:12
As usualI'm way behind everyone else and am not sure if we are supposed name other sites but there is quite a bit about von Luckner on Mac Gregory's site. Re the Sydney, I hope the truth comes out but feel there may be people still around to-day who don't want that to happen. One of my cousins was lost with the Sydney.
Robbo

trotterdotpom
9th July 2005, 08:30
You will not believe this
That film was on Sky TV this afternoon.
Ron

Quite a coincidence - did you get to see the Duke's swollen head?

The film was based on a book by an American called Andrew Geer, who also, apparently, had something to do with the film. A fictionalised account of the exploits of the German armed merchant raiders. Bit of added love interest of course. Not a bad yarn.

John T.

Guest
9th July 2005, 19:53
While researching for this book I also read that a film was made of it called "Under 10 Flags" a Dino de Laurentis film. So I'm off again looking for the movie.
JR

Saw that in the cinema when it first came out! That's a while ago.

Dave

John Rogers
13th July 2005, 18:47
To let all you guys know who helped me with the book I was looking for I received one of them today, the Hard Cover 1927 edition of the Sea Devil, it is slightly used but its a first edition.
Now for some good reading. Thanks again
John.

Succour
4th March 2009, 08:05
Cleaning out some old boxes (very old).
I came across this book. Where it came from I have no idea.
It is stamped 'Blue Funnel Library' this encircling an AH flag.
Inside the cover, a ships name PERSEUS.
I have attached a pic of the cover, a pic of page 42 and an illustration of a ship on page 43.
Any help or info on this would be appreciated.

Succour.

DAVIDJM
4th March 2009, 20:34
is there date of printing inside the cover

Succour
10th March 2009, 10:08
First Published in 1952 by
H. F. & G. WITHERBY, LTD.,
5 Warwick Court, London, W.C.1.

Dedicated, in affectionate rememberance, to
PHILIP HENRY
11th Marquis of Lothian.

Thanks again
Succour.