Are there any communication on 2182?

sven-olof
8th October 2008, 23:35
Im not an RO, but in my teenages I dreamed to became one.

So all evenings during the 1970 s I was sitting and listening on 2182 k.
As you remembered it was a very very busy frequency and sometimes dramatic too arund the north sea.
I really enjoy the pictures i SN gallery from radio rooms. And I enjoy You old sparkies diskussions.
The sparkies are now gone from the seas and my question Is it worth the job to bring the longwire up again. Is it empty on 2182?

Is there any internet sites where you can listen live from any parts on the world with heavy maritime traffic?

rgds

Mimcoman
9th October 2008, 03:57
Hi, Sven-Olaf:

There is just about nothing to listen to on 2182 nowadays. I've been monitoring 2182kHz in the North Sea now for about 30 Years (I left the Merchany Navy in 1979 and worked at Stonehaven Radio/GND until 1998, and since then have been working at Aberdeen Coastguard). There are long periods when nothing is heard at all. Better at night, when stations on the east coast of North America can be heard (especially the Canadian Coastguard stations) but nothing to what it was about 10-15 years ago.

Globaltuners.com has a good reputation as an internet site for remotely-accessible receivers, although I do not have personal experience.

73 es gud dx
Bill

ddraigmor
9th October 2008, 17:43
If it's VHF and busy then there is an excellent site at:

http://www.ais-live.co.uk/AIS%20Live/channel12.html

From there choose your player. If you want, get the AIS Live map up as well and you can plot them as well as hearing them. I live in hope that someone in Liverpool / North Wales Coast will do something similar!

Jonty

mikeg
9th October 2008, 20:06
Hi, Sven-Olaf:

There is just about nothing to listen to on 2182 nowadays. I've been monitoring 2182kHz in the North Sea now for about 30 Years (I left the Merchany Navy in 1979 and worked at Stonehaven Radio/GND until 1998, and since then have been working at Aberdeen Coastguard). There are long periods when nothing is heard at all. Better at night, when stations on the east coast of North America can be heard (especially the Canadian Coastguard stations) but nothing to what it was about 10-15 years ago.

Globaltuners.com has a good reputation as an internet site for remotely-accessible receivers, although I do not have personal experience.

73 es gud dx
Bill

Hey thanks Mimcoman, I didn't know about Globaltuners.com - I've now signed up - excellent site, many thanks.
(Thumb)

Mike

Coastie
10th October 2008, 02:24
Hi Sven-Olof.

There are still the Maritime Safety Information Broadcasts which go out on MF from some Coastguard Stations in the Uk and around the world. The preamble's for which go out on 2182 and then retune to whatever frequency the station refers you to (1770kc/s, in the case of Shetland Coastguard and 2226kc/s for Aberdeen Coastguard.)

As mimcoman says, the frequency is a lot busier at night but it is not as busy as it used to be, although it has it's moments. You often hear the offshore supply and standby vessels call one another though.

Hope this is of help.

Coastie
10th October 2008, 02:27
Oh yes, I almost forgot the whistling to one another from the various fishing boats!!(Jester)

Chief Engineer's Daughter
10th October 2008, 18:31
Hi Sven-Olof

Yes 2182 is alot quieter than it used to be. There is no longer that racket at 3 minutes after the hour and half hour when there was the old silence periods. However, as Coastie says you might hear Shetland Coastguard announcing our MSI broadcasts at 0710 and 1910 (you might even hear me!), Aberdeen Coastguard's at 0730 and 1930 (all at local time). St Johns Coastguard Radio can be heard on a regular basis. The standby vessels and the fishing boats can be heard to so 2182 isn't completely quiet!

Skol
CED

Chief Engineer's Daughter
10th October 2008, 18:35
I forgot, Malin Head Coastguard Radio can be entertaining at times!

Coastie
11th October 2008, 00:03
That's true CED!!! LOL!!!

sven-olof
11th October 2008, 20:20
Thanks all for your kindly answers. Perhaps (probably) I have heard just you during the 70 and early 80s?
In west coast of Sweden I had very good signal strenghts from all the English stations from both west and east coast of GB.
Well I should perhaps put the antenna up again and be up late nights and watch.
(as when I was a young lad during bad weather in winther and busy 2182k and mom tells me to go bed and school next day.. )

But the disturbance levels in middle of a city must be far heavier now than for 30 years ago

Has the coastguars stations in GB taken over the MMRC?


I will also try the websites : When I opened the Globaltunes it was some familiar to me from a similar site I saw for some years ago?
Was it DXtuners?

Ill be back when the gear is in operation.
rgds from sweden
sven-olof

Mimcoman
11th October 2008, 21:23
Thanks all for your kindly answers. Perhaps (probably) I have heard just you during the 70 and early 80s?
In west coast of Sweden I had very good signal strenghts from all the English stations from both west and east coast of GB.
Well I should perhaps put the antenna up again and be up late nights and watch.
(as when I was a young lad during bad weather in winther and busy 2182k and mom tells me to go bed and school next day.. )

But the disturbance levels in middle of a city must be far heavier now than for 30 years ago

Has the coastguars stations in GB taken over the MMRC?


I will also try the websites : When I opened the Globaltunes it was some familiar to me from a similar site I saw for some years ago?
Was it DXtuners?

Ill be back when the gear is in operation.
rgds from sweden
sven-olof
MMRC??? HM Coastguard stations are all MRCCs - Maritime Rescue Coordination Centres - but their radio callsigns are the name of the Coastguard + - eg Shetland Coastguard; Forth Coastguard; Thames CG, etc. Not all are on 2182.

You're right about the noise levels - at Aberdeen, we can't use local receive aerials for 2182 watchkeeping due to the noise levels in the Aberdeen harbour area. Instead, we use aerials about 10NM up the coast at Cruden Bay, which also provides separation from our main transmitter site at Gregness, just to the south of Aberdeen.

You might consider use of the Wellbrook tuned loop aerial - it is almost magical at reducing receiver noise levels.

DXtuners was something like Globaltuners , but is now defunct.

Best 73
Bill

sven-olof
30th December 2008, 23:46
Now I have listened to some 2182 traffic on globaltuners.
Best reception was from a station in Holland.

I clip in a link to some old recordnings from 2182 at Bryan Richards home page. Listen on the AA tone. It must have woken up you ROs every night?

http://www.family-richards.org.uk/bryans_world/oban_radio.htm

Finbar O'Connor
31st December 2008, 03:56
Greetings Sven-Olaf,

Have you looked at the Coastalradio web site. Lots of
photo's of coast radio stations, including the station
where I work, Malin Head Coast Guard Radio EJM.

There are a number of recordings on this site featuring
activity from Malin Head Coast Guard Radio.

I'm not sure if the comment about Malin Head
being entertaining is a compliment or a slur.
as mentioned in a previous posting.

Best regards
Finbar O'Connor
Senior Radio Officer EJM

R651400
31st December 2008, 12:32
Finbar, I don't think any slur was intended but I have to say that both EJM and EJK had very warbly notes on MF in the old days.

Coastie
31st December 2008, 13:31
No, Finbar certainly no slur intended from either myself or my colleague.

King Ratt
31st December 2008, 17:08
I was still in senior school in SouthWest Scotland mid 50s and spent many an hour or so listening to the traffic on 2182 Kcs as it was named in those days. This was when A3 was the method of modulation. Once darkness had fallen the sound of many quite distant stations calling and heterodyning made almost music to my ears. Ships were still using 2182 to establish comms with their pilot stations and I often heard them calling Southampton Patrol, Dungeness pilot and closer to home, Point Lynas pilot. Later on in the evening stations on the East coast of America and Canada were sometimes heard. 2182 was indeed a busy frequency and it is such a pity it is now almost QRT.

Happy New Year to All.

deckboypeggy
31st December 2008, 18:04
If it's VHF and busy then there is an excellent site at:

http://www.ais-live.co.uk/AIS%20Live/channel12.html

From there choose your player. If you want, get the AIS Live map up as well and you can plot them as well as hearing them. I live in hope that someone in Liverpool / North Wales Coast will do something similar!

Jonty

HIddraigmor just visited the site you have recommended,wow,another world has just arrived for me to keep lots of hours occupied, thanks happy new year,deckboypeggy

Chief Engineer's Daughter
31st December 2008, 21:32
I'm not sure if the comment about Malin Head
being entertaining is a compliment or a slur.
as mentioned in a previous posting.


Finbar, it is a compliment. You and your colleagues at Malin are a legend. (Thumb)

Finbar O'Connor
1st January 2009, 02:41
Greetings again from Malin Head Radio.

Thanks for the kind comments on our station. We have been through
a bruising few years, with the threat of closure , both EJK and EJM.
Now we can relax again, the drastic plans have been scrapped and
we will continue.
Regarding our warbly note in the MF WT days......I agree. Our
transmitters were not very good, and the MCW tone generator
was forever blowing fuses, I even remember the number , FS10.

Whilst 2182 khz is not like it used to be, it still provides some
gems and is useful in emergencies. Just before Christmas,
the Canadian CG picked up a distress message on 2182 khz,
indicating a Mayday with 13 persons needing assistance.
Falmouth CG despatched 2 Nimrod aircraft to the position.
We searched our 2182 khz recorder, but could hear nothing.
Later it emerged the Azores picked up an EPIRB signal and
rescued 13 persons from a stricken vessel. The Canadians
had such a weak signal they got a digit wrong in the Latitude.
Turned out to be the same vessel.

Let me take this opportunity to all those on the list, those
at sea and ashore, working in marine rescue and those who
like to listen, a very Happy New Year for 2009

Finbar O'Connor
Malin Head Coast Guard Radio EJM

sven-olof
1st January 2009, 13:35
Listened on the AIS link. Wery good reception. Why not channel 16?
Were is the receiver exactly located?
rgds

Coastie
1st January 2009, 17:14
Greetings again from Malin Head Radio.

Thanks for the kind comments on our station. We have been through
a bruising few years, with the threat of closure , both EJK and EJM.
Now we can relax again, the drastic plans have been scrapped and
we will continue.
Regarding our warbly note in the MF WT days......I agree. Our
transmitters were not very good, and the MCW tone generator
was forever blowing fuses, I even remember the number , FS10.

Whilst 2182 khz is not like it used to be, it still provides some
gems and is useful in emergencies. Just before Christmas,
the Canadian CG picked up a distress message on 2182 khz,
indicating a Mayday with 13 persons needing assistance.
Falmouth CG despatched 2 Nimrod aircraft to the position.
We searched our 2182 khz recorder, but could hear nothing.
Later it emerged the Azores picked up an EPIRB signal and
rescued 13 persons from a stricken vessel. The Canadians
had such a weak signal they got a digit wrong in the Latitude.
Turned out to be the same vessel.

Let me take this opportunity to all those on the list, those
at sea and ashore, working in marine rescue and those who
like to listen, a very Happy New Year for 2009

Finbar O'Connor
Malin Head Coast Guard Radio EJM


And the very same to you as well Finbar.(Thumb)

sven-olof
2nd January 2009, 00:31
Thanks for the website. I looked it all over and find it very interesting to se all
the photos. There are more to find. Also listended at the com files.
At nights I try to listen on globaltuners for 2182 traffic.

rgds

sven-olof
8th July 2009, 22:52
Thanks for the website. I looked it all over and find it very interesting to se all
the photos. There are more to find. Also listended at the com files.
At nights I try to listen on globaltuners for 2182 traffic.

rgds

If I use Globaltuners radios nereby coast in UK and Ireland which frequencies are most busy with coast guard radio and ship traffic?
Where can I find those freq?

Klaatu83
9th July 2009, 00:16
2182 used to be the medium frequency, "single side-band" calling and distress frequency. It was heavily used until February 1999. At that time the new GMDSS (Global Marine Distress Signaling System) was implemented and, for the first time since 1912, when the Titanic sank, ships were no longer required to carry radio officers. All communications duties were turned over to the Licensed Deck Officers, who are now required to have a GMDSS license in addition to their Masters or Mate's Licenses. Most communications are now conducted by satellite or telex. "Single Side-band" radio is still carried, but rarely used. The use of "long-wave" radiotelegraph ("CW") has also been discontinued.

K urgess
9th July 2009, 01:05
M/F R/T was always DSB when I was at sea.
Didn't get anything as fancy as SSB until into the 70s and then only in the H/F bands.

sparkie2182
9th July 2009, 01:26
2182Khz was always DSB even after the SSB "revolution".....

This was originally to allow for ships during the transition between DSB and SSB who only had a DSB Rx to be able to receive a distress call/message from a ship fitted with SSB.

Stuff of maritime history.

Chief Engineer's Daughter
9th July 2009, 19:55
If I use Globaltuners radios nereby coast in UK and Ireland which frequencies are most busy with coast guard radio and ship traffic?
Where can I find those freq?

HM Coastguard uses 2182, 1770, 2226 and 2596 mostly.

sven-olof
9th July 2009, 21:03
HM Coastguard uses 2182, 1770, 2226 and 2596 mostly.

Thanks for the freq.
I will test tonight.
regards

sven-olof
7th November 2014, 22:35
After years of searching ive found a site with lots of recordnings from maritime radio, coastguard during 1970-80 s.

It is called: Virtual Museum of Radio Communications.

http://www.utilityradio.com/

(surely you recognize some of the voices)