Bought in Japan

TonyAllen
17th October 2008, 16:06
What was the cheapest thing you bought in Japan and gave to you dad I bought a razor blade sharpener for a few pennies in 1955 and my dad used it until he passed away in 1970 he would only throw the old blade out once every three months or so, would not used any new type of shaver. I wanted to keep it but my sisters threw it out before I had a chance to to get it Tony Allen

Albert Bishop
17th October 2008, 19:58
Not the cheapest, but late fifties in Japan, can anyone remember those battery operated tin toys, busses fire engines etc, that had a little radar type mast on top? They came supplied with a whistle, and when blown the radar dish would turn and the thing would move towards the sound. It was possible to walk round the alleyways with them following. Never saw them again anywhere else, Wish I had bought one and kept it, (in its box of course) Also remember loads of Japanese people cleaning their teeth with disposable bamboo tooth brushes as they walked to work. They had to be pretty cheap, but I never managed to get one. Cheers Albi.

trevor page
17th October 2008, 20:16
Her name was Kazuko and she was quite wonderful.

ian keyl
17th October 2008, 20:21
Bought in Japan.
There must be loads of lads out there who have bought many various things in japan.
I remember buying the best wet weather gear there was ,it consisted of two pairs of over trousers small ankle boots and a over coat which incorportaed a hood with a plastic see thru visor. Absolutly great for stand bye when in monsoon weather. it all used to pack away in a small bag. The jacket had a vent across the back on the shoulder line so you could breathe in them. Bought in Kobe 64/68 10-12. If that.

Then there was the list for all the mates at home , Fibre glass fishing rods , Sking gear and skies, Kimonos ,Miki- moto string of pearls for the mum and mum in law. Pearl earings for the sister, Noritaki full 96 pcs dinner china set .
All the other good gear watches cameras and hi-fi was cheaper in HK-S'pore.

In the Diamaru stores in Kobe just off the Moto matchi you find any thing and everything, at the top of the esculator on each floor there was a Japanese lady in uniform and white gloves who could talk english, german and tell you what was on that floor or answer most questions.

Trouble was your subs soon ran out if you were in dry dock for a week and you had been up the road in the bars buying pink water (champange).

great times whgat ever.

Ian.

Bill Davies
17th October 2008, 21:07
I purchased an electric guitar in Kobe late 1960. It was a 'Tiesco' and cost me thirty thousand yen. I still have it but I do not believe it has increased in value.

Tai Pan
20th October 2008, 11:10
Tea sets. about 1000 yen, packed in wooden box, once opened impossible to repack. still got mine from 1952.

Pat Hughes
20th October 2008, 11:17
Not the cheapest, but late fifties in Japan, can anyone remember those battery operated tin toys, busses fire engines etc, that had a little radar type mast on top? They came supplied with a whistle, and when blown the radar dish would turn and the thing would move towards the sound. It was possible to walk round the alleyways with them following. Never saw them again anywhere else, Wish I had bought one and kept it, (in its box of course) Also remember loads of Japanese people cleaning their teeth with disposable bamboo tooth brushes as they walked to work. They had to be pretty cheap, but I never managed to get one. Cheers Albi.

These toys were in some respects ahead of there time and in any case very instructive.
I remember a tractor with the engine block in clear perspex which allowed you to see the pistons and crank operating. How they produced such toys for the price was beyond me.

TonyAllen
20th October 2008, 14:57
Bill Look up the web there are hundreds of guitar buyers out there many collectors you never know. I bought a guitar every trip and amps long before the were cheap to buy in this country cheers Tony Allen

Pat Kennedy
20th October 2008, 18:17
I bought my Mother one of those 1000 yen tea sets where you could see the silhouette of a geisha girl if you held the cup up to the light. And I bought my Dad a blue silk Kimono dressing gown with a huge dragon on the back. both items from Diamaru in Kobe.
The tea set is still in the family,fifty years later, but some swine stole the kimono when my Dad was terminally ill in hospital.
Pat

TonyAllen
20th October 2008, 18:26
B****rds god forgive them I would not Pat TonyAllen

Pat Kennedy
20th October 2008, 18:30
B****rds god forgive them I would not Pat TonyAllen

I never have Tony, but as they say in this neck of the woods, "what goes round, comes round"
Pat

Bill Davies
21st October 2008, 18:52
Bill Look up the web there are hundreds of guitar buyers out there many collectors you never know. I bought a guitar every trip and amps long before the were cheap to buy in this country cheers Tony Allen

Tony,

One of these days I'll retrieve it from the attic. I'm sure I can still manage 'Apache' (which tune inspired me to buy the guitar)

Brgds
Bill

Gareth Jones
21st October 2008, 19:05
Kobe, going back to the ship just prior to sailing, I bought a stainless steel bottle opener for the few coins I had left.
It still lives in my kitchen cutlery draw and is brought out for parties etc. It always, always attracts someones interest due to the Japanese writing on it.
Undoubtedly the best souvenir I ever bought ! - come to that , wonder what happened to all the other stuff I accumulated ?

Pat Kennedy
21st October 2008, 20:22
I dont know about buying stuff in Japan, but I remember every time I was there, we were selling stuff to the Japanese dockers to raise enough money to go ashore one last time. Woolen knitwear was particularly sought after.

As for guitars, I believe the best acoustic guitars were those manufactured in Lapu Lapu City in Cebu. I bought one for around a quid in 1960, and sold it back in the UK for 20, it was a beaut, a huge thing like those Mexican mariachi bands use.
I too could pick out "Apache"
Regards,
Pat

Tai Pan
23rd October 2008, 09:53
Purchased a huge box of christmas tree decorations in Moto Machi for about 1. there must have been about 50 different baubles. that was about 1954. still got two pices left which are carefully put on our tree every xmas and the story told.

railroadbill
24th October 2008, 16:01
The best thing I ever bought from Kobe (from a little Jap named Tom who came on a bike and wore a beret) was a pair of Binocta 7 x 50 binoculars for about 3 which have excellent optics. I still have them too !
The second best item I bought from him was a National rice steamer for about 5 which lasted for 15 years.

R651400
25th October 2008, 07:32
When I bought my original Nikon F SLR in '62 (75 or almost a month's wages), the Kobe camera shops were selling off the earlier rangefinder version for peanuts. Saw one on ebay recently for just under 500.

Robinj
26th October 2008, 14:54
I agree with Trevor they were beautiful, and I also have a Kimomo somwhere around.

PADDY
23rd March 2009, 13:04
Hi all,
Does anyone remember the Plaza Souvenir shop in Kobe?
It was just outside the docks entrance, some great buys there!.
I still have the original price list from 1960 when I was on Pyrrhus. Tried to upload but the file is too large.

Paddy

TonyAllen
23rd March 2009, 15:37
Yes Paddy.Was in there in 56/57 on the pyrrhus and was able to sign for what you bought, and the chief steward payed the bill and docked it from your payoff, she was a good ship and known as the rock an roll Pyrrhus becouse of the great band we had on board Regards Tony Allen

ronmac6
23rd March 2009, 21:17
I bought my Mother one of those 1000 yen tea sets where you could see the silhouette of a geisha girl if you held the cup up to the light. And I bought my Dad a blue silk Kimono dressing gown with a huge dragon on the back. both items from Diamaru in Kobe.
The tea set is still in the family,fifty years later, but some swine stole the kimono when my Dad was terminally ill in hospital.
Pat

I too bought one of those tea sets for my mum & the price included delivery. (by freight) when I was on one of Denholms bridge boats mid seventies.
It arrived home around the same as I did a couple of months later & I found one cup was smashed. When I wrote to them they sent another replacement by airmail. My mum died last year (87) & the tea set was the only item I wanted to take home as a memory.

In Yokohama (?) some years later I discovered a great market under the railway arches a few miles long full of fascinating shops & stalls where I bought a copy Zippo lighter. It was a bit battered but had a swastika with the legend underneath of "Bravo Hitler".
Another item I bought was very non PC, a little coloured figure with an aperture in its ass for a plug to be inserted & lit which resulted in a very long bowel movement over a period of time. It didn't last long as I had a conflict of conscience & was glad to deep 6 it.

regards
ronmac

PADDY
25th March 2009, 21:02
Hello ronmac,
I think you may be thinking of the Motomachi in Kobe, stalls and shops and stalls!! As I remember it seemed to go on forever with all the bars off to the side streets. Ah, memories!!!


Paddy

ronmac6
25th March 2009, 21:11
Hello ronmac,
I think you may be thinking of the Motomachi in Kobe, stalls and shops and stalls!! As I remember it seemed to go on forever with all the bars off to the side streets. Ah, memories!!!


Paddy

Thanks Paddy
Thats exactly where it was. Couldn't think of the name.
Fascinating place. I spent hours there until I heard the bars calling for me !

cheers
ronmac

Pat Kennedy
25th March 2009, 22:34
There was a movie house along the Motomachi, I saw that film with Tony Curtis chained to Sydney Poitier, as a pair of escaped convicts, dubbed into Japanese but still a great picture. There were a crowd of yanks in there from a ship called the Golden Bear, and they invited us back for supper. No beer , it was a dry ship.
Pat

Bilge rat
25th March 2009, 23:06
Seems all the china boat men are coming out of the woodwork once Kobe was mentioned. Kobe also takes me back to memories of see through tea sets, guitars, and various toys. Free newspapers being sent to you from bars you had never visited, free taxis sent by department stores where you ran out of money the day before. Life was great in the early 60's especially in Japan.
'Machaon' 1960

Pat Kennedy
25th March 2009, 23:25
Seems all the china boat men are coming out of the woodwork once Kobe was mentioned. Kobe also takes me back to memories of see through tea sets, guitars, and various toys. Free newspapers being sent to you from bars you had never visited, free taxis sent by department stores where you ran out of money the day before. Life was great in the early 60's especially in Japan.
'Machaon' 1960

The Bosun of my first ship, the Achilles, Bill Carmody, had a bar in Kobe called the Surf Rider. it was run by his 'wife'. Bill would distribute cards down the sailors alleyway the day before we got to Kobe, and promised a free drink to anyone who dropped in.
The rest of the trip he barely spoke to anyone.
Pat

TonyAllen
25th March 2009, 23:29
On the Elpenor I bought a full dinner service for my parents wedding aniversary for 5 and it was boxed and deliverd on board and sent to our house my dad put the box in the cellar and put his tools in it,They moved house and the box went with them,55 years later I still have the dinner set and my sister gave the box and tools away,I still dont speak to her it contained a multI shoe last and a three ft wooden leg that the last fitted into
and he made are shoe repars,I bought lot of things in kobe for my sisters Regards Tony Allen

Thats another Story
26th March 2009, 00:25
Seems all the china boat men are coming out of the woodwork once Kobe was mentioned. Kobe also takes me back to memories of see through tea sets, guitars, and various toys. Free newspapers being sent to you from bars you had never visited, free taxis sent by department stores where you ran out of money the day before. Life was great in the early 60's especially in Japan.
'Machaon' 1960

SMOKED FIRST JOINT THERE YANKY GRUNTS FROM THE VC WAR OF MY HEAD EVER SINCE

dave13
26th March 2009, 03:42
Believe me. Nothings cheap in Japan now, Its costing me over 8 a pint.

nightjar
4th April 2009, 09:08
i was an engineer on ss patroclus in early1960,s and bought my girlfriend a china teaset which we still have today. also bought a plate with a picture of her baby sister embedded in it and she still has it today.
also bought a mechanical toy (charlie weaver) who drank and smoked -sadly it got lost.

Bitterlakes1967
11th April 2009, 18:39
Most expensive night was in KOBE back in 1965. Myself and a junior engineer had a meal served by two off proper Geishers [ or Makos]. They were in full costume and served the food and plied on the Saki. I think the bill came to nearly a months pay [Junior lecky] about 45!!!!!!!!!.

Neil Mant
11th April 2009, 19:24
I bought a tea and coffee set my mother still has both 25 years old. With the Geisha Girl in the bottom,
Neil

trucker
11th April 2009, 19:56
bought my gran. tea set,and mam coffee set in 1968.both passed away now,but passed onto my
wife .which we still have.forgot all about them untill read last post.

Dolius
7th June 2009, 21:13
I only had to pay the entrance fee for this souvenir.

Derek Roger
8th June 2009, 02:43
Only thing I have left is 4 silk pictures of Japan ( one for each season ) plus the tea sevice . My Kimono fell to bits many years ago .

Derek

Old Janner
11th June 2009, 13:11
Split cane fishing rod sets (2) in a lovely box complete with flys and other assorted hooks, Famous Tea sets, Binnoculars, and Sony Radios, which could pick up the BBW World service and listen to the Merchant Navy programme.
Another item was the the lovely decorated wooden boxes that could only be opend by sliding various pieces of wood around to get the lid off.

Kobe, I remember a lovely tall bar hostess who used to peel me grapes with her long fingernails, took me another three trips to feel those lovely finger nails on my back.

Tokyo was always good normally had to wait a couple of days in a Hotel to get a flight back to the UK.

Good days.

AGAMEMNON
11th June 2009, 18:02
Great thread! Must support the National rice steamer. Had one and it went for years and years. Also bought my Mum a tea set in Nagoya in 1962, about Y1000. She died a couple of years ago when I found she had given it to my daughter-in-law who treasures it! What memories. Don't get me going on carcoats and no-squeak shoes from HK! Remember Bar Ber in Kobe, among the beer you could get a haircut!

TonyAllen
11th June 2009, 21:35
When I started this thread I had not relised how much stuff I had bought in Japan and hong kong,seems that a lot of other guys had done the same thing.
Going thru our loft to clear some jumble to give to the local dog shelter we found a little china jug and six small tots to drink with, the jug whistled when you poured it out,Ithink it was used once and then my mother put it in a glass cabinet.What made me buy it I dont know,I guess it was just a gimmic and I spent my last few yen on it.Regards Tony Allen

Bill Davies
11th June 2009, 22:26
Great thread! Must support the National rice steamer. Had one and it went for years and years. Also bought my Mum a tea set in Nagoya in 1962, about Y1000. She died a couple of years ago when I found she had given it to my daughter-in-law who treasures it! What memories. Don't get me going on carcoats and no-squeak shoes from HK! Remember Bar Ber in Kobe, among the beer you could get a haircut!

Carcoats were very popular in the early 60s. I cannot remember them fbeing around my China days (pre 61) but I bought half a dozen later in tramps.

Bill

Monket
11th June 2009, 23:33
All I ever bought in Japan was Sun Tory(sp) whisky.

Billieboy
12th June 2009, 05:30
Bought a tea set on my first trip to Japan in '62, sent it to my favourite aunt but forgot to tell her it was coming! It was a few years later that I remembered it. Bought three Seiko 5 automatic watches at a fiver each, wore mine everywhere, never less than 100% accurate, checked it against the chronometers a few time. My dad and his best mate, wore theirs until they died 15+ years later, never even serviced.(Thumb)

johnb42
12th June 2009, 09:05
The best thing I ever bought from Kobe (from a little Jap named Tom who came on a bike and wore a beret) was a pair of Binocta 7 x 50 binoculars for about 3 which have excellent optics. I still have them too !
The second best item I bought from him was a National rice steamer for about 5 which lasted for 15 years.

Bought a National rice cooker in Japan somewhere in the mid '70s and it's still going today.

vasco
13th June 2009, 17:52
Japanese puzzle box. Mine still works. My brother-in -law got frustrated and threw it against the wall, so good by to that. Mind you perhaps I should not have put a penny in it. He said the rattling got to him.

Kimonos, Donkey cigarette cases (press head, fag comes out filter first under tail), watches.

In Chairman Maos Emporium, Hong Kong bought a compasss set, whichI still use. Got a free towel with it. Cost 10 bob.

And of course, another suitcase to take it all home in!

Graham McMorine
11th July 2009, 16:21
Got a Seiko watch in 1966, the type which has a small ball bearing on a arc track as a winder, still going strong today.Local jeweller offered me 100 for it, but told him sentimental value made it priceless to me. Bought two tea sets, one for wife and one for Mum, have both of them now Mum has gone. Got a radio controlled motor launch from a Big store in Yokohama ( Mitsubishi store I think ) Grandson plays with it now. Wish stuff lasted as long these days.

Regards to all . Gra.(==D)

Bill Davies
11th July 2009, 17:03
And people in UK used to say Japanese stuff didn't last. How wrong they were.

Hugh Ferguson
12th July 2009, 20:11
And people in UK used to say Japanese stuff didn't last. How wrong they were.

The "thumb nail" is of the cover of a book purchased in Tokyo in 1907 by Dr. James Johnston Abraham, the author of the book The Surgeon's Log.
Whilst the Polyphemus (the ship he was making a one off voyage in) was in Yokohama, the good doctor took the opportunity of visiting Tokyo for a day in March 1907.
I inherited the book-just a year or so before she died-as a gift from his daughter Jill.

Bill Davies
12th July 2009, 21:52
Big store in Yokohama ( Mitsubishi store I think ) Wish stuff lasted as long these days.

Regards to all . Gra.(==D)

The name of the large store in KOBE...Diamaru???

Hugh Ferguson
13th July 2009, 11:02
The "thumb nail" is of the cover of a book purchased in Tokyo in 1907 by Dr. James Johnston Abraham, the author of the book The Surgeon's Log.
Whilst the Polyphemus (the ship he was making a one off voyage in) was in Yokohama, the good doctor took the opportunity of visiting Tokyo for a day in March 1907.
I inherited the book-just a year or so before she died-as a gift from his daughter Jill.

Since posting the foregoing I have checked the details entered by Dr J.J.Abrahams in his log journal of the voyage (his daughter gave me a photo-copied folder of the entire record). The book, Geisha Girls of Japan, was purchased in Tokyo on the 14th March 1907. How extraordinary it is to recently learn that Japan has in excess of 30,000 people of age one hundred and over, some of whom-almost beyond belief- still work!! Many of those long living people would have been living at the time when Dr.J.J.Abrahams, the Blue Funnel, Polyphemus ship's doctor, bought this book in a shop in Tokyo so many, many years ago.
What a lot of water has passed under a lot of bridges since then, especially in Japan!

TonyAllen
13th July 2009, 11:42
Hugh. A very interesting tale you tell,re the age of japanease people in those days as to today, do you think it was the westernisation since then,that has the result of living to a much shorter life. I have asked my local libary to find a copy of the book you mentioned Regards Tony Allen

Hugh Ferguson
13th July 2009, 18:30
It's a fascinating topic, Tony, the longevity of Japanese people. One immediately thinks of their diet which, in past times was somewhat low in protein which was largely derived from fish and next to nothing of red meat.
But what about the deprivation I witnessed still very apparent at the time of my first visit in July 1947. Those centenarians lived through that: one might even argue that a bit of deprivation is good for the liver, the heart, the arteries etc.. Compared to our Western culture which is highly permissive in comparison to their more structured life-style. Whatever, it is a phenomenal number of people living to a more than ripe old age. In this country there are quite a lot of people who live a long life, but there are also a great many who do not!

Bill Davies
13th July 2009, 18:53
Without doubt, the best Ch.Mate I ever sailed with was a Japanese individual in the early 70s. He was always moaning about the way traditional Japanese values were being eroded. He would get quite emotional when describing the soup his mother used to prepare him for breakfast when he was unattached.
He was very critical about his partner ,at the time, who used to have Juice, Special K, and occasionally Scrambled eggs for breakfast. The evening meal was a Steak of some description, fried egg and french fries. This, apparently, was the 'new' Japanese diet which he believed was in the Japanese womans pursuit of large breasts.

Graham McMorine
13th July 2009, 21:16
The name of the large store in KOBE...Diamaru???

Thanks for that Bill , however, it was definitly bought in Yokohama.

Cheers, Gra.

Thats another Story
14th July 2009, 06:29
Seiko Watch Bought In 1968 Still Going One Of My Boys Just Bought Me A New One 200 Quid 8 Months Wages Then?

Billieboy
14th July 2009, 07:59
Seiko Watch Bought In 1968 Still Going One Of My Boys Just Bought Me A New One 200 Quid 8 Months Wages Then?

Forty Five pounds ten shillings p/m for a J/E in 1962, but a Seiko 5 only cost a fiver in Nagoya in '63/4!(K)

spongebob
14th July 2009, 08:55
Forty Five pounds ten shillings p/m for a J/E in 1962, but a Seiko 5 only cost a fiver in Nagoya in '63/4!(K)

Billiboy, that ties in with my start as a J/E 1957 on thirty seven pounds ten shillings.

Bob

Bill Davies
19th July 2009, 09:53
I am currently wearing a Seiko Sealion which I bought in Japan in the early 60s. Lately, it is developing a life of its own and gains about two minutes a day.
I cannot claim to have had it on my wrist all that time but the amazing thing is i just keep on going back to it although it has been in the top draw for a year or more on occasions.

makko
19th July 2009, 13:52
Did anyone buy Bangkok Silverware? Bronze cutlery, rosewood handle with a meditating Buddha decoration.

Me and my brother had extracted some pieces to dig in the garden. Of course, we forgot to return them. I got the "Gypsy's warning" off the Old Fella to bring a replacement set back! I complied, buying them in the Bangkok Mish, although I felt that they weren't the same quality.

Rgds.
Dave

Bill Davies
19th July 2009, 14:42
Did anyone buy Bangkok Silverware? Bronze cutlery, rosewood handle with a meditating Buddha decoration.

Me and my brother had extracted some pieces to dig in the garden. Of course, we forgot to return them. I got the "Gypsy's warning" off the Old Fella to bring a replacement set back! I complied, buying them in the Bangkok Mish, although I felt that they weren't the same quality.

Rgds.
Dave

Dave,
Your post has reminded me of one of the names used for 'Liverpool/Birkenhead Dockers' (there is a separate thread).

There was one docker, known as the 'Angry Cat' who used to go from hatch to hatch and shout down 'Is Me Owl fella Down der'. Emphasis on 'Me Owl' as in Meeoww.

Brgds

Bill

bugga divino
19th July 2009, 15:01
Bought a Seiko multi dial watch 1990 in Yokohama for my dad. Paid about 250 US for it (gold plated and all). Still have it - perfect working order, and looks as good as new (inherited it as my dad passed on in 1995). A new one costs around 500-700 USD today duty free.
A JVC micro stereo system bought at Yoko for about 200 USD in 1990. Absolutely beautiful - still sounds pristine (compared with what you have today)...Used to swear at JVC. Now swear by them.....
Two sets of Noritake crockery - paid about 150 USD for them in 1990..... Still have one of them - rarely used, and cost a couple of thou today - fantastic stuff - the other is still with my mum......
Those of us still around - wonder if we will be having the same conversation in about 10-20 years about what we picked up in Shanghai or Dalian..??..

Bill Davies
19th July 2009, 15:42
I can only repeat my post # 45.
More inportantly on this site, and not wishing to be controversial, I don't think anyone can doubt they built the finest ships.

makko
19th July 2009, 18:57
I can only repeat my post # 45.
More inportantly on this site, and not wishing to be controversial, I don't think anyone can doubt they built the finest ships.

Bill,
I would tend to concur..........

It was only through this site that I realized that I only ever sailed on Nagasaki's finest, MHI vessels all! While the steel wasn't always the best quality or homogenous, at least two of those vessels are STILL in service, 32 years on!!!! Partly vision, partly quality and in large measure, the care and attention of the "finest" who, purely by coincidence were trained by and worked for a traditional far-east trade tramp company that shall remain nameless! Ha-Ha!
Rgds.
Dave

TonyAllen
19th July 2009, 23:30
Hi I was reading thru the threads again to just to oil my brain so to speak,then I remembered buying cufflinks in HK made out of demerzine ? they were black and silver, I gave them to a mate to wear to go to a dance never saw them again anybody have any still. cheers Tony

Billieboy
20th July 2009, 08:06
Hi I was reading thru the threads again to just to oil my brain so to speak,then I remembered buying cufflinks in HK made out of demerzine ? they were black and silver, I gave them to a mate to wear to go to a dance never saw them again anybody have any still. cheers Tony

I've still a pair of cuff links and a tie clip, I'd bought them for my father off the bum boat man in Shimonoseki one trip, inherited them when he passed on, son,(31) thinks they look great, on a white shirt, with my old school tie! I also have one of those scroll silk paintings of a geisha cost a quid in '63 in Yokohama.

Trident
20th July 2009, 09:10
I bought one of those Yashica 8 mm cine cameras with the turret lens beautifully made and would have lasted a life time if zoom lenses and Digital had never been invented.
I still have heaps of film stowed away somewhere

Roger Bentley
20th July 2009, 15:16
Following two tours in Hong Kong, have piles of items bought there at DaiMaru and other outlets. All of it good value - cameras, watches, crockery, cutlery. Looking round the loft the other day came across a cigarette case I bought on my first trip to sea in October 1950. We called at Kure on the trooper Lancashire. It is engraved with a picture of Hiroshima, my Dad never used it and I picked it up again after he died and we were sorting out his effects.

Bill Davies
20th July 2009, 19:25
Brought home a toy battery operated tractor ( 18" x 9"x12" approx) late 50s/early 60s as a present for a relative. This toy, although very colourful was made of clear perspex iwo the engine block which allowed the owner to see the all the working parts.
I am sure there are other members who would have bought the same toy (probably Diamaru Store). It was a work of art and I am only too sorry I cannot get my hands on it today. Nowadays I have to make do with the MF variety.

Bill

Billieboy
21st July 2009, 08:55
On passage, to load Gulf for Japan, one morning session before lunch, the OM (Joe Hunter, from Lerwick), said it would be great if we could buy some Cannon Binoculars when we arrived. So I said write a letter to Cannon Japan, saying that we would like to buy about twelve pairs of 7x30 glasses. On arrival there was a letter from Cannon saying that their local agent had been advised and that he would attend on arrival. The result was that we purchased some 25 pairs at six quid a pair in 1964! I lost mine somewhere in Germany in the early eighties. A really good buy of quality gear.

Trident
21st July 2009, 10:13
Still have a pair of Zenith 7 by 50 Binoculars bought 1960.......Al

Philip Jones
21st July 2009, 10:32
Hi I was reading thru the threads again to just to oil my brain so to speak,then I remembered buying cufflinks in HK made out of demerzine ? they were black and silver, I gave them to a mate to wear to go to a dance never saw them again anybody have any still. cheers Tony

I bought a powder compact(as well as tea and dinners services and a kimono fro my dad as well as some 20 x 50 binoculars with such a narrow field that you could not see anything). The material was Damascene, apparently an ancient technique. I think swords were decorated by this method.

TonyAllen
21st July 2009, 17:57
Phil thanks for the correct spelling, its amazing what people keep in the attics sheds and wherelse Regards Tony

PADDY
21st February 2010, 10:38
Thanks to another thread in another Forum on SN, finally discovered how to downsize my files for use as attachments

Dolius
21st February 2010, 14:07
Thanks to another thread in another Forum on SN, finally discovered how to downsize my files for use as attachments

I remember the Plaza Store. I am sure that written somewhere on their brochure is their motto. "We believe honesty is the best policy, and that policy is not the best honesty " !!!!

capt.jim
28th February 2010, 19:37
I've still a pair of cuff links and a tie clip, I'd bought them for my father off the bum boat man in Shimonoseki one trip, inherited them when he passed on, son,(31) thinks they look great, on a white shirt, with my old school tie! I also have one of those scroll silk paintings of a geisha cost a quid in '63 in Yokohama.

pair of cuff links bought in the 50s just been through the washing machine and look like they were newly made .also a seiko automatic which must be at least 30 years old and worn every day and has newer had a thing done to it . happy days if hard working

TonyAllen
25th August 2011, 23:56
What was the cheapest thing you bought in Japan and gave to you dad I bought a razor blade sharpener for a few pennies in 1955 and my dad used it until he passed away in 1970 he would only throw the old blade out once every three months or so, would not used any new type of shaver. I wanted to keep it but my sisters threw it out before I had a chance to to get it Tony Allen

Another old thread for new members Regards Tony

Barber Hector
6th October 2011, 20:20
About 35 years ago when the RoX was about 1000 yen to the pound I bought a couple of round transistor radios for the children. They turned out to be the Japanese version of Sputnicks and are worth a considerable amount of money on Ebay now. However the [now middle aged] kids are hanging on to them in case the price goes up further. Nothing gets thrown out in this house !

capt.jim
7th October 2011, 21:37
just recalled the name of the man who came onboard in nagoya selling tea sets etc. yushida ,he had a small factory and his two daughters did the decorating . you ordered one trip and collected the following voyage still have the bamboo patern tea set

TonyAllen
8th October 2011, 00:29
just recalled the name of the man who came onboard in nagoya selling tea sets etc. yushida ,he had a small factory and his two daughters did the decorating . you ordered one trip and collected the following voyage still have the bamboo patern tea set

Cap,I still have the 101 hundred dinner set bought for my mum and dad in 1955 in nagoya and its still only worth buttons in money but its going to my son soon so thats 3 generations that will have had it Regards Tony

makko
8th October 2011, 15:55
just recalled the name of the man who came onboard in nagoya selling tea sets etc. yushida
You could also pay by english cheque and they would send the tea set, wrapped in straw to the destination. Nothing ever arrived broken although there was a replacement guarantee.
Rgds.
Dave

Quiney
8th October 2011, 18:30
I bought two craft knifes in the Moto Machi in Kobe, back in 1979.
They were the type where you can break-off a small piece of blade to give a new sharp end. They were about 100 yen each.
Gave one to my father-in-law and kept one for myself. Have used mine for years (replacement blade became available in the UK)
When the FinL died, his knife came back to me! So now I have two.
They are still in use, far better than any of the ones that I've subsequently seen in the UK.

Thats another Story
8th October 2011, 19:20
the everlasting match dolls and a kimono with a dragon in silk and remember the writing paper made of thin wood? grey matter is starting in the memory banks now.john

alan ward
15th October 2011, 15:18
I have bought a Sony cassette player/recorder with separate speakers,a lovely Pioneer tuner/amp and speakers,a couple of asahi pentax cameras,more cotton kimonos for use as dressing gowns than enough,but the best surviving buys are 2 pieces of calligraphy that are framed and on the wall in our bedroom and a small sushi knife that has been in constant use since 1972 and refuses to die.It`s been dropped,bent,lost and found,rusted and cleaned sharpened and resharpened and still keeps on going.Cost?about 4