The Tramps Are Alive?

Hazonline
11th November 2008, 19:04
Hey guys.

Are any tramp steamers - or tramp vessels, still around??

Cheers.
Haz.

Thamesphil
11th November 2008, 23:09
Any cargo ship that isn't on a line voyage - i.e. on a fixed route/schedule - is tramping. Therefore, tramp vessels make up about 90% of the World fleet.

Hazonline
12th November 2008, 17:30
Then what's the point in having a Tramp Steamer section seperate for all else???

non descript
12th November 2008, 17:49
Then what's the point in having a Tramp Steamer section seperate for all else???

I read your message as one of criticism rather than support, but that is maybe my mistake?

Please bear in mind that whilst all Turtles can swim, not all Swimmers are turtles…

So it is, that by having a separate forum for the cargo ships that earned their living as "Tramp Ships", whilst not essential, it allows for threads like Panaghis Vergottis (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=907) to be put up for the enjoyment and benefit of all; a bit like Members who take the time to place a bit of information in their profile, that is also not essential and we do not criticise those that don’t, but it is a benefit.

Do try to enjoy the Site for what it is....

Bill Davies
12th November 2008, 18:07
Then what's the point in having a Tramp Steamer section seperate for all else???

Because there are members of this site who have sailed in the tramp companies Watts Watts, WHSN, etc, etc. The memberships is 'down by the head' with tramp men

Ron Stringer
12th November 2008, 18:43
I it allows for threads like Panaghis Vergottis (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=907) to be put up for the enjoyment and benefit of all

Off the topic, I know, but I did sea trials on that vessel. The owner's rep on board refused to accept that first-time responses to HF R/T test calls from the North Sea to Ocean Gate in the USA and St Lys in the South of France, or morse tests to San Francisco and Sydney Australia, were satisfactory indications that the radio station was working properly. Nothing less than a response on both R/T and morse from ''Athinai Radio'' would do. He argued that after all, the ship would route nearly all its radiocommunications via Athens Radio/SVA, so he had to be sure that the ship's radio was compatible with that station. The ship would probably never use any of the other stations, so he wasn't interested in them. Simple logic (well, definitely simple.)

non descript
12th November 2008, 19:32
Thanks Ron, and I have taken the liberty of copying your post to the other thread as well.
(Thumb)
Mark

Hazonline
12th November 2008, 22:31
Ok! Sorry! Twas no intentional insult!

non descript
12th November 2008, 22:47
Ok! Sorry! Twas no intentional insult!

Thanks and I am sorry I took it the wrong way – but it does once again underline the risks of the written word versus the spoken word. With that in mind I would always urge people to add the odd emoticon just to make the point. – After all one can say “that’s great” and mean one thing, and “that’s great” and mean exactly the opposite…(Jester)
Regards
(Thumb)
Mark

Bill Davies
13th November 2008, 10:20
There were different levels of Tramp owners. Some were very rough indeed like Irish Shipping whilst other tramps like Watts Watts were a pleasure to sail in but not easy to get a job in. I would say I enjoyed my time in tramps more than in L & H, Harrisons, Blue Star, Blue Flu and other liner companies.

tell
13th November 2008, 15:03
when the three 'Rs' came in, the pool would scatter like wild fire they were reputed to be bad ships to sail in.... Radcliffes Runcimans and Ropners

ddonner
10th December 2008, 03:47
Dear Trampers,
Do Tramps still accept the occasional passenger, or has modernity limited the opportunity for unscheduled travel?

Bill Davies
10th December 2008, 08:58
Dear Trampers,
Do Tramps still accept the occasional passenger, or has modernity limited the opportunity for unscheduled travel?

They all carried their fair share of passengers!

Ron Stringer
10th December 2008, 09:06
Dear Trampers,
Do Tramps still accept the occasional passenger, or has modernity limited the opportunity for unscheduled travel?

Not quite a ''tramp'' experience, but not a cruise liner either. Try this http://www.aws.co.uk/cruises/

R651400
10th December 2008, 11:42
They all carried their fair share of passengers!As did Blue Funnel!

Bill Davies
10th December 2008, 16:26
R651400,

Didn't know Blue Funnel were a tramping outfit.

R651400
10th December 2008, 16:53
Affirmative.

forthbridge
10th December 2008, 17:14
Not quite a ''tramp'' experience, but not a cruise liner either. Try this http://www.aws.co.uk/cruises/



This one is interesting as well
http://www.strandtravel.co.uk/strand_voyages/index.aspx

Jim Brady
10th December 2008, 18:02
I dont know about the three R's but the name Baron or King comes to me.
You would scatter from the Pool when ever one of these were "going through"
As you approached the Pool the conversation would be"Whats going through
boys" any Tramps going was bad news. Fortunately most of the guys that
sailed (no option) on these ships had a bad discharge i.e. Double DR single
DR or V.N.C..This is why the crew was made up of a crowd of "Cowboys".
On the other hand you could have a crowd that wanted to clear their book
and get accepted back onto the Pool as a "good boy"
The story goes the guy was in the Pool and was offered this nice ship the
Barongedes which he accepted when he got down to the ship it turned out
tobe the Baron Geddes!!!

0
0
0
p

Alistair Macnab
19th December 2008, 20:19
Tramps -v- Liners
Probably Bank Line (Andrew Weir Shipping) was the borderline between the one and the other. Weirs had very many worldwide liner services, Indian-African Line, Oriental African Line, SoPac Service, SAFBank Line (two-way) but many services were one way: India-West Africa (Elder Dempster voyage charter), Calcutta-River Plate Service, India-WCSA Service, U.S.Gulf-Australia Service; U.S.Gulf-New Zealand Service which had to have tramping connecting voyages to link up with one of the other "lines"
Then there were purely tramping voyages like the Phosphase run; River Plate grain and so on.
Breakbulk cargoes nowadays have "parcels" of what used to be tramp cargoes. Bottom stows of steel, forest products, bulk fertilizer, bulk rice, copra with "generals" or heavy lifts or projects on top to fill out the ship. These are invariably "liner" voyages in as much as the operators mount a regular service .
So the distinction of tramp -v- liner is fast disappearing as are the ships designed for such trades having given way to bulk carriers as a recognized class of ship now operating in the so-called tramping trades.
But for the purposes of SN, I would agree that most members know when a ship is a tramp or a liner and which company was regarded as a tramp or liner company. It may have been technically a misnomer but there was very little disagreement which was which and what was not!
Alistair.

Arthur Jenner
9th January 2009, 08:26
Tramps can be tankers I suppose. I was once on a Shell tanker, MS Flammulina that the Tilbury Pool Office told me would be just a short trip to Curacao and home - 6 weeks at the most. I took it. We went to Curacao as promised and then we did a few runs between there and Venezuela. After that through the Panama to Chile and then a few runs between Columbia and Peru. Back through Panama to Aruba and then to Italy and Greece. The Persian Gulf was next and from there to France and back to the Gulf to load for home. More than eight months. Talk about tramping.

kudu
9th February 2009, 15:00
some companies prided themselves as tramps. I served my apprenticeship
with Stag Line,who used the logo "handy tramps" on correspondence.
Passengers were often carried.I know of a number of pre-sea students
from South Shields marine college who did a trip for experience during holidays.
Kudu.

Klaatu83
1st April 2009, 00:29
I was on the USNS Towle three times between 1977-79, as Third Mate and, later, as Second Mate. The Towle was the last of the Military Sealift Command's Victory Cargo Ships, and had seen almost no modernization since World War II.

She was the closest thing to a tramp freighter I was ever on, or probably ever will be. During the period I was on the Towle every voyage we made was supposed to be the last. However, somehow the powers-that-be always managed to find one more cargo just before we got back. We never knew what part of the world we'd be going to next, or what sort of cargo we'd be called upon to carry. One trip we would carry ammunition to the West Coast of South America, and the next we'd transport a load of trucks to Yemen. I learned more about seamanship, cargo handling and navigation on that old ship than I ever did in four years as a cadet. What a shame it is that today's officers will never have an opportunity like that!

spongebob
1st April 2009, 01:39
I once went on board a "real" tramp, an old Liberty ship that was apparently owned by a crew syndicate and others and was tramping the world. We were in Apia Western Samoa in the late 50's loading bananas when we met a couple of the tramp's engineers ashore and accepted an invitation to go on board for a couple of Becks beers.
She was basic in all respects, a very rusty hull and upper works and the accommodation was still "as built" for the wartime role. The engine room was a little better, a neat and tidy triple expansion steam engine with all the brass bright but never the less she looked very schooner rigged.
They had shipped a cargo from the States to American Samoa then W.S and was moored hoping for a load for elsewhere. I don't think that she would have had much luck as apart from fruit and copra not much came out of the islands in those days except that shipped by scheduled lines and she would have had to steam in non paying ballast to a more lucrative shore.
Apparently these ships were very cheap to buy then but dear to run and I imagine that a lot of these post war gamblers lost out in the long run. I recall it stirred the adventure genes for a while but looking back it must have been a hard and uncertain l way to earn a living.

Bob

KIWI
5th April 2009, 21:44
Sailed on a Norwegian Liberty tramp & its cargoes over sixteen months were as follows.Laurenco Marks to Wellington NZ with coal.Wellington to Vancouver ballast.Vancouver Sydney Adelaide lumber.Port Lincoln Bombay grain.Bombay Karachi ballast.Karachi Hong Kong Tsingtao cotton.Dairen peanuts 500 tons thenChingwangtow soyabean cakes to Rotterdam.Left.Reading the ships log book was a case of "i've been everywhere man". KIWI

O.M.Bugge
11th April 2009, 10:09
What is it with you Brits and this hang-up about the ddistingtion of Tramps and Liners?
As said at the beginning of this Thread, 90% of all world shipping is tramping.
There is no "liners" as we knew it left. Aside from a few large Container ships and a few others, like ferries and Cruise Ships, (which is mostly square ugly boxes, with few exceptions) on regular runs.
I remember talking to a Brit some 30 years ago who said; "some of friend have gone tramping" in a negative tone of voice
When I asked with which company, he replied; Maersk.
Maersk is the larges "liner company" in the world and the majority of the britishliner companies has packed in, gone bust or gone tramping.

Nick Balls
11th April 2009, 10:25
Tramping was how Arthur Jenner describes it here (No 21)
That was the great thing about it you had absolutely no idea of what would happen next or just when you were likely to get off. Absolute heaven for a young man !!!!! Probably some of my best trips were on the SD 14 Cargo boats , shunned by many as "pretty basic" but boy did they end up in some exotic places!!!!!

Jim Harris
11th April 2009, 12:04
That was the great thing about it you had absolutely no idea of what would happen next or just when you were likely to get off. Absolute heaven for a young man !!!!! Probably some of my best trips were on the SD 14 Cargo boats , shunned by many as "pretty basic" but boy did they end up in some exotic places!!!!!




NOW THAT'S WHAT WE ALL WANT TO HEAR ABOUT!

Sir, can you tell us more about these exotic ports.... the laughter,
music, fun and experiences you had?[=P]

Regards,

Jim.

Nick Balls
11th April 2009, 14:08
Well Jim there are a few on this site who tell a better story than I !
I recall that quaint expression " Going up the road" A deceptive little phrase
that encapsulates absolutely everything there is to it !! " Are you coming up the road then ?" was the shout . A first tripper would be thinking "What road" how , what , when " This was not a consideration for the seasoned mariner!
His ability to seek out the fun music and laughter is unparalleled . It makes the "Rough guide to..." look simply tame and pretty foolish .

Jim Harris
12th April 2009, 08:59
Well Jim there are a few on this site who tell a better story than I !
I recall that quaint expression " Going up the road" A deceptive little phrase
that encapsulates absolutely everything there is to it !! " Are you coming up the road then ?" was the shout . A first tripper would be thinking "What road" how , what , when " This was not a consideration for the seasoned mariner!
His ability to seek out the fun music and laughter is unparalleled . It makes the "Rough guide to..." look simply tame and pretty foolish .



But nobody can tell the story like the man who was actually
there.

Cummon Nick....[=P]

stores
12th April 2009, 16:52
hi, dont know how we managed to find the action, but it usually worked out we did, sometimes good sometimes bad, but usually the former, ended up in many strange places, often wanted to write a book, but discretion the better part of valour, oh for the good old days, STORES.

kudu
15th April 2009, 19:32
your right there Stores.No matter where we went we always found something.Even in tiny one horse,or should that be one ship ports we could find fun.Quite often the small ports off the beaten track provided agood night out,more so if ships were a rarity.Places like Limerick,Piambino in Italy and Panjang in Sumartra.Even the old man copped off in Panjang,I should know,I was in the next room! kudu

hwyliwr
1st October 2009, 20:14
I did a voyage on a tramp called the Ripley owned by Stephens and Suttons of Newcastle, signed on, on the 26- 01-1961, and paid off on the 10-12-1961, Has anyone else on this site sailed with this company, as I never did come accross any of their ships again in my time at sea.

tsell
1st October 2009, 22:49
Did a number of trips in one old tramp, great crew, exotic dodgy ports, but we had that many 'Change of orders!' at sea that we were constantly altering course. Giddy we were! We wondered if we were going to end up our own ar... sorry..., stern!!

Taff (Cloud)

john dodd
2nd October 2009, 13:48
Well Jim there are a few on this site who tell a better story than I !
I recall that quaint expression " Going up the road" A deceptive little phrase
that encapsulates absolutely everything there is to it !! " Are you coming up the road then ?" was the shout . A first tripper would be thinking "What road" how , what , when " This was not a consideration for the seasoned mariner!
His ability to seek out the fun music and laughter is unparalleled . It makes the "Rough guide to..." look simply tame and pretty foolish .

I have just read this, and had a job to stop laughing. We were painting the ships side on the quay in Buenaventura, Columbia, in shorts @ flip-flops, standard dress in '60's, when a mate of mine used those very words, " coming up road" at dinner time 12pm, we made our way up to the first one out the gate, Pitty,s, had a few cervezas before heading for "shanty town" where all the girls @ "bag off bars" on to the cuba libres, by 6pm were all well on our way. a fight started between us @ a few "Norski's, during the fight the juke box was damaged, police arrived, and we were all banged up for the night. the girl I was with earlier even brought us sandwiches. Cecelia you were fantastic. Like Nick says, " Rough guide to where?. J.D. p.s. The fact that we smoked a few "Dodgy" fags that night, added to the hilarity off a great run " up the road". Ship, m/v Exning. Tatem's loading sugar for Japan! even more fun.

ray morgan
22nd December 2009, 21:49
I was on the "Baron Minto",in 1964,we were on passage from Casablanca to Moji,Japan,with Phosphates,via the Suez Canal,stopped at Singapore for bunkers. In the South China Sea we stopped for a fishing boat in distress,(short of fuel.)she came alongside and we formed a bucket line from the engine room and they filled a 45gal drum on there deck,they opened there hatch and brought out a massive tuna, we sent down a handybilly and hauled it into the port midships alleyway,and got underway. Everyone was talking tuna steaks,tuna curry,etc.the Chief Steward appeared and said over the wall with it,Skipper said not taking a chance on its freshness,and over it went,even though the fishing boat hatch was full of ice. I think with piracy being rife, today no one would dream of stopping.

stores
22nd December 2009, 22:11
was there when with PSNC on MV SALINAS, what a place, went into town for a few beers, ended up i think they called it over the hill, a dirt road up a hill, the further up the rougher it got, bars up there just had a plain lightbulb, nothing plain about the girls ! ! we ended up at the top, next day ended up in the jungle in a mud hut, came back to ship like a drounded rat , walked back from jungle in monsoon rain found i had bought a parrot, also drounded , arrived on board with parrot on shoulder dripping wet, had that bird fo 20 years, cant remember what else i paid for ? ? ? STORES . READ ON INTERNET RECENTLY THAT BUENAVENTURA IS SO DANGEROUS WITH DRUG GANGS THE COLUMBIAN ARMY DONT LIKE GOING THERE, HOW TIMES CHANGE. .

Old Janner
23rd December 2009, 02:52
Thirty years ago the world was a better place, ports we went to then like Stores says, are now NO GO areas, Beunaventura 30 years ago was rough but a good run ashore, providing you kept in a group. I remember getting back on board in the morning then watching the stragglers return, just down to their skiddys and socks!
I always remember when in Rotterdam always buy to watches, one for wearing and one for 'Bag Off' no money for a sub, simple go ashore sell your watch or radio, always enough for a night out.
Four of us had a good night ashore in Abijan with nookey, on the sale of the Donkeymans radio, Ironic he was the only one that caught a dose.
Good days in many ports.

John Briggs
23rd December 2009, 03:42
I did a voyage on a tramp called the Ripley owned by Stephens and Suttons of Newcastle, signed on, on the 26- 01-1961, and paid off on the 10-12-1961, Has anyone else on this site sailed with this company, as I never did come accross any of their ships again in my time at sea.

I sailed on the Ripley as mate after she was sold to John Manners of Hong Kong and renamed Thames Breeze. She was a total loss after going aground on a reef in the South China Sea (after I left).
Manners bought a couple of Stephens Suttons ships.

ray morgan
23rd December 2009, 12:41
When I was on the "Woodford", in 1962 we called at Djakarta,Indonesia,at the time there currency was no good,so we were given sterling as a sub,but someone came back from ashore and said ,they were seached at the dock gate,there sterling and cigs were confiscated ,but were buying your clothes off you in the bars,we all put two shirts on each and went ashore,everyone came back with wafer thin kd's on and flour bag t shirts and flip flops.Someone came up with the ingenious idea of buying smoking pipes,we put are money compressed in the pipes,a little baccy on top and lit them as we approached the gate ,three of us, hands over our heads puffing away being seached, I think they were one pound notes not five,I had also put a note in a rolled cig ,senior service,took an extra packet in case the guard too the open packet off me at the gate.That night in the bar drunk, I lit a cig it keep going out,I kept lighting it had a horrible taste on it, then the penny dropped, it had a burnt hole in it and no one would accept it. In places like Manila, you came back by yourself, bouncing off every wall like being on a bagetelle board, as if you were dodging subs,I would not like to do it in todays climate, I think I was very lucky some states I got back to the ship in,I must have just switched the Iron Mike on,I remember waking up after being to the cages in Manila,with occupation pesos in your change of the taxi driver ,I wonder would it be worth something if you had kept it.

stores
23rd December 2009, 17:44
on her sister ship the wanstead, in pireaus the trick was to take cartons of cigs ashore, had a big high wall round the docks, one of us walked out with nothing , then walked back outside the wall whistleing, when u heard a whistle opposite from inside u yelled out now, and over came the cartons, 2 cartons each paid for u know what and a bottle of oozo, happy days. ! did this many times. was a 11 month trip. been to many dens of iniquity all around this big wide world , never got in bother, would be different today, MERRY CHRISTMAS, STORES.

K urgess
23rd December 2009, 17:55
And here's me thinking I'd been around a bit. (Both sides of South America twice).
Not a patch on you lot. [=P]
Funnily enough all my tramping trips were to "civilised" places except for the tramping tanker around the Carib.

Klaatu83
23rd December 2009, 18:00
"Then what's the point in having a Tramp Steamer section seperate for all else???"

I've sailed on "Tramps" as well as "Liners". There is a difference not only in the ships themselves but in the character of their crews. "Liner" crews know exactly where they're going to be going and exactly when they're going to come home. They know, for example, that after a given number of scheduled round-trips they're going to be eligible to get off. They like the fact that they can plane their lives around a fixed schedule, almost like citizens ashore. they are often men with wives, families and mortgages. On the other hand, a "Tramp" crew have no idea where they're going to go from one voyage to the next and have no idea when, or where, they are going to pay off. Therefore, "Tramps" seem to tend to attract the more adventurous souls from amongst the sea-going community, and those without family ties to hold them down. At least, it's always seemed that way to me.

madbob
25th December 2009, 03:27
I remember my 'tramping' days with a fond nostalgia. The experiences formed the basics for a steadier life in later years. I always say "If you weren't game to try it - don't knock it !" Keep the recollections coming as the reading is fascinating.There were a lot of us around and as I read the memory clicks in and those experiences return larger than life. It only takes mention of a Port or a particular ship,bar,place and I can fly back up to 50 years. Nostalgia rules here and it keeps us young.
Happy and Peacefull Christmas to all.
MB

brenpower
27th December 2009, 22:15
Does anybody have a photo (or know where one exists) of the SS Largo Law, No 124163? My father served on her in 1924/1925. I am trying to get photos of all the ships he served on; so far I've managed to get 17 out of 20 and would love to improve on this. The other two missing are the SS Westhope (137267) and the SS Northborough (133411).

John Dryden
28th December 2009, 00:18
Well I know shipping has changed since my days with Bank Line but I would bet my hard earned cash there are still trampers plying there trade as we speak.A good ship and a good crew backed by good management and contacts will always find a cargo at the right price and still make a profit sailing to the right ports,think I just said that because Bank Line are no more and there are a lot of large ships laid up and nothing doing.

teb
28th December 2009, 02:39
I sailed on the Ripley as mate after she was sold to John Manners of Hong Kong and renamed Thames Breeze. She was a total loss after going aground on a reef in the South China Sea (after I left).
Manners bought a couple of Stephens Suttons ships.

John- reading your thread brought back memories for me -years ago when I was on the Baltic Exchange I was part of a team that did the fixing(chartering) for Stephen Sutton ships then later when shipbroking in Hong Kong I used to have dealings with John Manners particularly with Ernest de Lasala and Capt. Chris.Ostenfeld names I'm sure you are familiar with!!! Regards Teb.

John Briggs
28th December 2009, 19:26
Now you bring back memories for me Teb.
Ernest de Lasala and Chris Ostenfeld are names I know very well and they conjur up the the Manner days in my misty old memory.
What a great site this is!

tiachapman
1st January 2010, 04:17
m/v rodsley 1956 any members heard of her???

barney b
1st January 2010, 15:51
Surely a tramp is a ship with no regular routes. All Shell tankers were tramps, never knew where you were going from one trip to another.Also never knew when you would get off. Spent 12 months on the Valvata,must have been mad because could have paid off in drydock in Bremenhaven. Also sailed on Uskbridge one of Jones of Newport they were also tramps,especially when they lost contract between Ireland and Casablanca with phosate.We even went to the States and really got hammered going across N Atlantic,plates on bridge buckled in and windows broken.They were real ships, not like todays lot floating around in palaces.Ah happy days, I Think!!!

LANCE BALL
28th February 2010, 11:06
I did my first twelve years at sea on tramps out of Newcastle ,Souters , Sutherlands and WHSN, West Hartlepool Steam Nav. I enjoyed it, the longest voyage was 2yrs 1month which at the age of 17 to 19 was a wonderful adventure to a young man. The ship was badly run and hungry but it did not seem to matter.
Then the usual happened , masters ticket, marriage and a change to coastal /middle trade but i have always been glad that I spent those years roaming around the world and seeing so many places, often very primitive in a world that has disappeared,and that I saw all the continents and oceans of the world

Andrew Craig-Bennett
30th April 2010, 16:54
I tend to think of the classic tramp as a single tweendecker, like an SD14. Certainly there is a borderline between the tramp and the liner - some ships can be used either tramping or in liner service.

Here's one such, a "modern" ship with fully folding tweendecks and box shaped holds and container fitted (she's tramping in the picture)

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/data/510/thumbs/Kwangtung_.JPG

We do speak of the tramp containership meaning a containership that is owned for the purpose of being timechartered to container lines but since these ships are always by definition in liner trades even if not their own I am not very happy with the term.

I suppose today's real tramp is the handysize bulk carrier.

Trampshipman
1st June 2010, 15:41
[QUOTE=Jim Brady;272442]I dont know about the three R's but the name Baron or King comes to me.
You would scatter from the Pool when ever one of these were "going through"
As you approached the Pool the conversation would be"Whats going through
boys" any Tramps going was bad news. Fortunately most of the guys that
sailed (no option) on these ships had a bad discharge i.e. Double DR single
DR or V.N.C..This is why the crew was made up of a crowd of "Cowboys".
On the other hand you could have a crowd that wanted to clear their book
and get accepted back onto the Pool as a "good boy"
The story goes the guy was in the Pool and was offered this nice ship the
Barongedes which he accepted when he got down to the ship it turned out
tobe the Baron Geddes!!!

0
0

I sailed in Baron Yarborough in 1949. Primitive and very poor conditions. BOT ration scales [on your pound and pint], hungry all the time. Lived in `open foc`sle. Had to bath in a `bucket`. only water supply was `midships outside the galley. Stinking `icebox` on lower bridge, green meat after a week or two. Everything else infested with weevils, which you ate anyway because the only alternative was to starve.
The `punch line`is :- I did not know of ANYONE aboard that ship who had a DR [Bad discharge], or was a `COWBOY`.
Regardless, I wish I was back aboard her now.

Regards.

Ken.

Dickyboy
1st June 2010, 16:53
Though not trampers in the accepted sense of the word, I was on Many of BPs Product Carriers. We joined ships anywhere in the world, did trips from anywhere to everywhere. Had changes of orders frequently, we went where the cargoes were required, discharging parcels all over the place. Often discharging, loading another cargo, then returning to back load the original cargo. Orders could be changed at any time, even mid ocean. Often the first indication we would have of a change of orders was when the ship began to vibrate due to a change of course. I also joined a couple of ships in NW Europe and ended up coasting the Far East, Australia and New Zeland with no idea when joining the ships where I would end up. Not real tramping, and often the turnrounds were quite quick, but it was interesting and fun.
Often we got LEFO (Lands End For Orders) but never got there :o

tudor
21st March 2012, 05:16
Surely a tramp is a ship with no regular routes. All Shell tankers were tramps, never knew where you were going from one trip to another.Also never knew when you would get off. Spent 12 months on the Valvata,must have been mad because could have paid off in drydock in Bremenhaven. Also sailed on Uskbridge one of Jones of Newport they were also tramps,especially when they lost contract between Ireland and Casablanca with phosate.We even went to the States and really got hammered going across N Atlantic,plates on bridge buckled in and windows broken.They were real ships, not like todays lot floating around in palaces.Ah happy days, I Think!!!

Hello Barney..I was on that trip, Uskbridge, maybe 1968...to the states, mexico and down to BA...great trip, good tramping, crossing the line and all that good stuff. I was the deck apprentice until they sold out soon after.....Tudor Palmer

Split
21st March 2012, 18:50
[QUOTE=Jim Brady;272442]I dont know about the three R's but the name Baron or King comes to me.
You would scatter from the Pool when ever one of these were "going through"
As you approached the Pool the conversation would be"Whats going through
boys" any Tramps going was bad news. Fortunately most of the guys that
sailed (no option) on these ships had a bad discharge i.e. Double DR single
DR or V.N.C..This is why the crew was made up of a crowd of "Cowboys".
On the other hand you could have a crowd that wanted to clear their book
and get accepted back onto the Pool as a "good boy"
The story goes the guy was in the Pool and was offered this nice ship the
Barongedes which he accepted when he got down to the ship it turned out
tobe the Baron Geddes!!!

0
0

I sailed in Baron Yarborough in 1949. Primitive and very poor conditions. BOT ration scales [on your pound and pint], hungry all the time. Lived in `open foc`sle. Had to bath in a `bucket`. only water supply was `midships outside the galley. Stinking `icebox` on lower bridge, green meat after a week or two. Everything else infested with weevils, which you ate anyway because the only alternative was to starve.
The `punch line`is :- I did not know of ANYONE aboard that ship who had a DR [Bad discharge], or was a `COWBOY`.
Regardless, I wish I was back aboard her now.

Regards.

Ken.

Crikey, Ken! How can you wish to be back on one of those? In 1948 I made my first voyage as apprentice on a Counties Ship Fort.

Sounds as if she was a dozen times better than yours. We all moaned, of course, but the conditions you were sailing under were, frankly, a disgrace. Hogarth, Chapman, Ropner were all company names to send a shiver down our spines!