UK call signs "G---" or "M----"

Paul Baxter
15th November 2008, 09:49
I sailed on the MV Ixion (3) Blue Funnel and her call sign started with a "M" the full sign was "MLLR".

Just wondering if any one can put a light on when the UK used an "M" in a callsign? I can not find another "M".

She is Liverpool and UK flag. built 1951 tons gross 10,12514,000 HP speed 18kts Steam.
Sorry do not know her IMO number yet.

Thanks
Paul Baxter

Tai Pan
15th November 2008, 10:29
Ixion. H class ( Hector Helenus, Ixion, Jason) built for UK/Australia.
Built1951 scrapped 1972
enhines geared turbines 14,000 shp.
speed 18.5 knots. 2 oil fired foster wheeler boilers.
Best ships in fleet in their time. I did several on Jason, super accommodation, radio room, Oceanspan Mk1. Mercury Electra. Redifon emergency tx. Type M auto alarm. Loadstone DF.
Sailed to a very tight schedule ( despite aussie dockers).

R651400
15th November 2008, 10:33
I sailed on the MV Ixion (3) Blue Funnel and her call sign started with a "M" the full sign was "MLLR".

MLLB?

Tai Pan
15th November 2008, 10:36
The H class at their time had the Greatest Shaft Horsepower of any single screw vessel. cant think of Jason call sign.

Ivor Lloyd
15th November 2008, 10:37
Can anyone please assist with call sign of ss KENTWOOD ex Empire Hearth
Ivor

R651400
15th November 2008, 10:38
Three score and ten RAM revivers:-
Jason GBMW
Helenus GBTM
Ixion MLLB
Hector GBNK

Tai Pan
15th November 2008, 10:46
Three score and ten RAM revivers:-
Jason GBMW
Helenus GBTM
Ixion MLLB
Hector GBNK
Thank you. GBMW great call sign for area traffic, way in front of the poncey ships(K)

R651400
15th November 2008, 10:51
Think that should be RUM (random useless memory) don't think I could do the P boats so well.....

marco nista
15th November 2008, 11:25
[QUOTE=Paul Baxter;264866]I sailed on the MV Ixion (3) Blue Funnel and her call sign started with a "M" the full sign was "MLLR".

Just wondering if any one can put a light on when the UK used an "M" in a callsign? I can not find another "M".


---------------------------------------------------------------


I sailed on Shell's HAUSTELLUM/MSNJ in 1961/62 & AMASTRA/MYCK in 1966/67 & to the best of my fading memory HEMIFUSIS was MSDF & there were one or two other Joe Shells with 'M' callsigns.

In 1965 I worked aboard the rigs NORTH STAR/MIUJ [based in Gt.Yarmouth] & ENDEAVOUR/MITD [based in British West Hartlepool].

So it looked as though the classic 'M' 4-letter callsigns were being issued in the 50s & 60s.
I have seen more recent 'M' callsigns followed by a sequence of numbers.

Somewhere else on the thread there is a comment that the letter 'E' was rarely used in callsigns - I was told that this was 'cos it would be very easy to miss the character in poor conditions.
Nonetheless it was often used in both coast station & ship's callsigns - I sailed on ASPRELLA/GCKE, NATICINA/GXFE, ANCO SCEPTRE/GOQE, SOLITAIRE OF THE ISLES/GWEM & PASS OF BALMAHA/GUEX.

What was much more important for British 'G' callsign ships in Area Scheme days was the SECOND letter of your c/s as someone else has pointed out - this determined how long you had to wait before your tfc was broadcast.
With 'Queens' & their GB - - callsigns there were obviously vested interests at work during their callsign allocations !

Wasn't the prefix '2' [or maybe '2A' ?] also allocated as a British callsign ? I don't recall any ships with this c/s, but Shell's private station on Das Island was 2AI15


Cheers

Marco

K urgess
15th November 2008, 11:33
The Port Townsville was MGCV but the only "M" I sailed with.

It seemed to me that an awful lot of trawlers had "M" callsigns in the 60s and 70s.

Cheers
Kris

mike N
15th November 2008, 11:45
:rolleyes: Sailed on Orcades MABA ,long wait for area traffic and fairly busy radio office, not good. Also River Afton MQXX ,even longer wait but not much traffic anyway. Never did get on a G call sign. Left too soon. Ah well......

Bill Davies
15th November 2008, 11:48
The H class at their time had the Greatest Shaft Horsepower of any single screw vessel. cant think of Jason call sign.

I would check that statement!

Hugh MacLean
15th November 2008, 11:50
Can anyone please assist with call sign of ss KENTWOOD ex Empire Hearth
Ivor

Hello Ivor,

During WWII British ships were allocated the letters B, G and M for their radio callsigns. KENTWOOD official number 168797 ex EMPIRE HEARTH was callsign BDRW.

Regards

Tai Pan
15th November 2008, 11:52
I would check that statement!
I am quoteing from Merchant Fleets 6 by Duncan Haws.
I think the Helenus was the only ship in Holts that had a female name

Tai Pan
15th November 2008, 11:56
Wrong again. Helenus was the son of King Priam, sorry folks.

R651400
15th November 2008, 12:16
I am quoteing from Merchant Fleets 6 by Duncan Haws. It used to be said that the H class were faster than the overnight train service from Sydney to Melbourne.
Could it have something to do with the shaft hp you mentioned JG?

BobDixon
15th November 2008, 12:17
[QUOTE=Paul Baxter;264866]

Wasn't the prefix '2' [or maybe '2A' ?] also allocated as a British callsign ? I don't recall any ships with this c/s, but Shell's private station on Das Island was 2AI15




2 callsigns normally issued to RT only ships & started in 1970's I think - lots of inshore fishing vessels and yachts have such callsigns. Only WT fitted vessel I know of was Norina/2JUV which was smallish deepsea trawler.

Tmac1720
15th November 2008, 15:38
Correct me if I'm wrong but is "G" not the prefix for british registered aircraft (?HUH)

Hugh MacLean
15th November 2008, 16:12
Correct but I think you will find a/c callsigns are five letter as in G-ABCD.
Regards

Tmac1720
15th November 2008, 16:14
Thanks Hugh, at least I was close (Jester)

R651400
15th November 2008, 16:14
Correct me if I'm wrong but is "G" not the prefix for british registered aircraft (?HUH)They certainly are Tmac though "EI" Ryanair is a more common feature in this ilk.
Ivor Lloyd's "B" allocation came as a surprise and goes back a stretch..

http://earlyradiohistory.us/1913call.htms

"BY" and "BV" having been allocated to China and Taiwan since the list above.
"M" has always had Scottish connections "GM" being the amateur radio allocation for Scotland. I understand there was only one M naval station in the old days and that was Rosyth.

Ivor Lloyd
15th November 2008, 16:44
Hugh :
Many thanks for that.
Of all the ships I sailed on Kentwood was the only one whose Call sign I couldnt remember
Regards

Ivor

Hugh MacLean
15th November 2008, 17:05
I understand there was only one M naval station in the old days and that was Rosyth.

How far you going back R651400?

When I served 70/80's
Faslane MGJ
Plymouth MTI
Pitreavie MTO
Portsmouth can't quite remember, maybe MTN

Regards

BobDixon
15th November 2008, 17:05
Ivor Lloyd's "B" allocation came as a surprise and goes back a stretch..

http://earlyradiohistory.us/1913call.htm



Admiralty radio stations used to have B callsigns - Portpatrick/GPK having originally been BYS and Wick/GKR originally BYG

R651400
15th November 2008, 17:42
Hugh/Bob, thanks for your replies. Hugh being non RN I go back to the fifties looking at the current list of calls. I stand corrected but I remember only seeing Rosyth with a M call..

Bill Davies
15th November 2008, 20:34
I am quoteing from Merchant Fleets 6 by Duncan Haws.
I think the Helenus was the only ship in Holts that had a female name

John,

I am merely suggesting you check as I was under the impression that the 'P' class had the edge on the 'H'.
I have no doubt there are members on the site who will put us right.
Incidentially, I never sailed deep sea in any of the Aussie boats. Went around the land in a few.

Brgds

Bill

Magic Fingers
15th November 2008, 21:09
MTB102 built 1937 is MFRQ which I understand was allocated in 1937

Paul Baxter
16th November 2008, 07:35
MLLB?

Yes my error with big fingers "MLLB" is correct.

Thanks

Tai Pan
16th November 2008, 09:54
John,

I am merely suggesting you check as I was under the impression that the 'P' class had the edge on the 'H'.
I have no doubt there are members on the site who will put us right.
Incidentially, I never sailed deep sea in any of the Aussie boats. Went around the land in a few.

Brgds

Bill

Strange that, in the book it shows Peleus with a shaft HP of 15000, yet makes the statement about the Helenus . maybe the Helenus was launched a day before the Peleus. Still both class were super ships to sail on, never went deep sea on a P but enjoyed my time on Jason (Tegwyn Davies was the lst R/O)

R651400
16th November 2008, 13:56
JG, My reference to Blue Funnel H boats being faster than the 50's overnight Sydney to Melbourne train service is open to question.
The P class on the Far East run were always recognised as being the most powerful in the BF fleet.
"Around the land" another suspect BF misnomer Liverpool-Glasgow-Birkenhead, would leave Neil Oliver and the "Coast" TV team a bit short on material.

Roger Bentley
16th November 2008, 15:11
I think M was allocated quite some time ago, I sailed on Brocklebank's Marwarri and she was built in 1935 with the call sign MBVY. The Titanic had the call MGY but I think this related to the fact she was a Marconi equipment ship. Cape Race station was MCE and this presumably in the early days for wireless was also using Marconi apparatus. A 1927 Lloyds Calendar shows Maliin Head as GMH, and has the call GRL as allocated to Fishguard.

R651400
16th November 2008, 15:25
My reference to M and its Scottishness was not ship but more its amateur allocation and from memory my recollections of the RN Rosyth naval call.
GRL of course ending up as the MF Burnham-on-Sea-radio aka GKL or latterly GKA. Burnham-on-sea/GRL when terminated moved to Ilfracombe/GIL

NoMoss
16th November 2008, 15:52
I sailed on the SS Alpera with the callsign GBBB, very good if there was traffic in the list and if I missed the list (I was only just 18 years old at the time) I didn't have to listen for long after the list to see if there was anything for us.

K urgess
16th November 2008, 15:53
From -
"The Year Book of Wireless Telegraphy and Telephony" published in 1913 by the Marconi Press Agnecy.
These remain largely unchanged with only a few deletions. The 1920s convention changed the ship's callsigns to 4 letters.
An example is P&O's MOREA that was MMF then became GLVJ in 1927.

King Ratt
16th November 2008, 16:43
Rosyth Naval Radio c/s MTO
Plymouth was MTI (sometimes received as 8 with a makee learnee fist sending it)

Cap'n Pete
16th November 2008, 18:57
My ship has call sign "MQPF2" and was built in 1992. Almost all the British-flag ships I have sailed on in the last 20 years had call signs beginning with M although I'm not sure why.

Bill Greig
17th November 2008, 08:40
First trip was on M.V. Sussex/MAEF. Operated laterly by P&O General Cargo Division until scrapped in the late 70's. Built in 1947 I think for the Federal Line (NZ).

Keckers
17th November 2008, 08:57
My current place of work offshore has an M callsign, although we've never used it in anger, as it were. MPTK4 - Chevron Alba Northern Platform.

Most of my at sea callsigns were Arabic as I worked for UASC after serving my time as JRO. My favourite c/s was A7EE - which sounded great on the bug.

G4UMW
17th November 2008, 12:14
My frst two trips were on the Booker Vanguard/MHEM.

British amateur radio callsigns now begin with the M prefix.

Andy
17th November 2008, 12:22
British amateur radio callsigns now begin with the M prefix.

And 2E for the middle rung (lowest are allocated M3 now M6, intermediate 2E0, full M0) ... a waste of finite allocations, as one individual is likely to use up 3 callsigns in the new compulsory progressive system.
cheers,
Andy

Tai Pan
17th November 2008, 14:27
JG, My reference to Blue Funnel H boats being faster than the 50's overnight Sydney to Melbourne train service is open to question.
The P class on the Far East run were always recognised as being the most powerful in the BF fleet.
"Around the land" another suspect BF misnomer Liverpool-Glasgow-Birkenhead, would leave Neil Oliver and the "Coast" TV team a bit short on material.
truce. there was a story that the H & P class had been built with goverment help, they were designed to be converted to aircraft carriers and that the turbines could be altered to give a top speed about 28 knots, fact or fiction, good story though.

Pete Legg
17th November 2008, 14:41
Callsigns for Portsmouth (Fort Southwick) was MTN, Chatham was MTL.

Regards, Pete

charles henry
17th November 2008, 15:04
Don't know when the first was issued but in 1953 in the Cape Hawke it
was MAHB so it was probably not all that earlier than they started with
MAAA????

de chas

Roger Bentley
17th November 2008, 15:37
If you read my earlier post you will note that I mention the Marwarri built 1935 and having the call sign MBVY. I don't think there was any real sequence of issue of these M calls.

R651400
17th November 2008, 16:12
Earliest I can recall...Fort Beauharnois/MAAR

IanSpiden
17th November 2008, 19:29
Went from the End of the traffic list to the begining

Pando Cove MLQP
Canberra GBTT

King Ratt
17th November 2008, 19:41
Faslane Naval Radio was MGJ. Used to be on 3319 Khz CW.
RFA Warspite was MAAK.

JimC
17th November 2008, 20:07
I sailed on the MV Ixion (3) Blue Funnel and her call sign started with a "M" the full sign was "MLLR".

Just wondering if any one can put a light on when the UK used an "M" in a callsign? I can not find another "M".

She is Liverpool and UK flag. built 1951 tons gross 10,12514,000 HP speed 18kts Steam.
Sorry do not know her IMO number yet.

Thanks
Paul Baxter

Ship's signal letters began with G as the first letter in the hoist. When the combination of the other three were exhausted in the registration book - they started the next group on the list with an M.

This goes back a long time

BobDixon
18th November 2008, 00:49
Canberra GBTT

GBVC ???

James_C
18th November 2008, 01:12
Would think so Bob as GBTT belongs to QE2.

BobDixon
18th November 2008, 01:26
Would think so Bob as GBTT belongs to QE2.

And before that to the original Queen Mary (see attachment)

R651400
18th November 2008, 06:17
Having a GB call on a H24 ship must've been a boon.
Though Queen Mary/GBTT and Queen Elizabeth/GBSS covered the H24 Tfc Lists, at GKA they had their own QTC point.
Communications between the operations room and tfc controller was by voice, the two "ladies" known as "Tango-Tango" or "Sierra-Sierra" when they called in for tfc.

Malcolm S
18th November 2008, 07:46
I sailed on the Royal Mail vessel Drina - seem to recall her call sign was MAIL but maybe confused with another vessel. She was built way back when!
Malcolm

Roger Bentley
18th November 2008, 17:27
The P & O Himalaya maiden voyage October 1949 and into 1950 had the callsign MCDY (I remember this call very well as I heard it often enough on my first trip to sea in October 1950) , obviously there must have been representation about her having to lurk at the back of traffic lists, and shortly afterwards she was given GBDK.

Bill Davies
19th November 2008, 22:54
truce. there was a story that the H & P class had been built with goverment help, they were designed to be converted to aircraft carriers and that the turbines could be altered to give a top speed about 28 knots, fact or fiction, good story though.


I recall walking around an 'M' boat in 60 to view the McGregor hatches. I noticed the construction of the contactor houses were different iwo of the exposed beams on the deck thereof. This, I was assured was for extra strength and to enable guns to be fitted in wartime. The real reason was probably the Naval Architect was simply looking for space in the contactor room itself.

GBXZ
20th November 2008, 03:04
I seem to recall in the late 60s hearing an Irish ship with the call-sign
EISH.....or am I dreaming?

andysk
20th November 2008, 11:48
...... Having a GB call on a H24 ship must've been a boon. ......

It was a pain on an H8 ship, though it did ensure a prompt on watch regime !

(Rothesay Castle, GBQA)

R651400
20th November 2008, 14:23
It was a pain on an H8 ship, though it did ensure a prompt on watch regime ! (Rothesay Castle, GBQA)

Prompt watch regime when?
Regulations for British ships circa 1956 at the beginning of each H8, two hour watch period, the entire area control tfc list had to be copied call by call and from then through the end of the two hour watch a log entry every five minutes...

andysk
20th November 2008, 15:24
Prompt watch regime when?
Regulations for British ships circa 1956 at the beginning of each H8, two hour watch period, the entire area control tfc list had to be copied call by call and from then through the end of the two hour watch a log entry every five minutes...

AFAIR, we only ever copied the first part - collectives ? then the few around the current vessel's callsign - I don't recall ever having to copy the whole list !

Still had the log entries every 5-10 mins.

Shipbuilder
20th November 2008, 19:20
TRANSVAAL CASTLE was GBQE & that was great. After being renamed S.A.VAAL kept the GBQE for some time, but when the port of registry was changed from London to Cape Town, it became ZSNT - from the sublime to the ridiculous!

First M call sign I was with was MNDJ on flatiron collier WANDSWORTH, but didn't bother me as we were never in W/T traffic lists anyway. My last call sign on the brand new ST. HELENA was the dreadful MMHE5 - although one could get a fine rhythm with a bug key. Old S.T. HELENA was GXUY & I don't really know how we got away with it because ship was registered in Jamestown, St. Helena, so should probably have had a Z call sign. New ship was registered in London.

Bob

GALTRA
20th November 2008, 20:38
Not really into call signs but I thought this might be of interst. Most of the Ms from 1925.

trotterdotpom
20th November 2008, 22:50
I was surprised to read that ships registered in Australia, New Zealand and Canada had British call signs at that time.

I wonder if "MRVJ, James Craig of Hobart, Tas" is the same "James Craig" which is now restored and sailing again in Sydney Harbour -see website http://www.shf.org.au/JCraig/JCraig.html

John T.

R651400
21st November 2008, 07:21
AFAIR, we only ever copied the first part - collectives ? then the few around the current vessel's callsign - I don't recall ever having to copy the whole list !Still had the log entries every 5-10 mins.
Interesting Andy, maybe it was a GTZB thing but I do remember occasionally a H8 that had missed the Area tfc list asking for a copy on 500.

oldmarconiman
21st November 2008, 08:05
I sailed on Ellermans "City of Durban", launched 1953 completed 1954, with callsign MQZZ. One of those nice rythmic callsigns to send in Morse code.

I sailed on the MV Ixion (3) Blue Funnel and her call sign started with a "M" the full sign was "MLLR".

Just wondering if any one can put a light on when the UK used an "M" in a callsign? I can not find another "M".

She is Liverpool and UK flag. built 1951 tons gross 10,12514,000 HP speed 18kts Steam.
Sorry do not know her IMO number yet.

Thanks
Paul Baxter

NoMoss
21st November 2008, 08:27
Interesting Andy, maybe it was a GTZB thing but I do remember occasionally a H8 that had missed the Area tfc list asking for a copy on 500.

An interesting discussion. I remember when I first went to sea I religiously copied the entire list but later just entered the MBMS etc. As I said earlier when I was on a ship with the c/s GBBB it was easy to miss, if I missed the first part of the list but didn't have long to wait when traffic was being broadcast.
On that ship the Radio Room and my cabin were in the wooden Bridge-house and led off each other so I did my dhobi and ironing on watch.

Tai Pan
21st November 2008, 09:50
AFAIR, we only ever copied the first part - collectives ? then the few around the current vessel's callsign - I don't recall ever having to copy the whole list !

Still had the log entries every 5-10 mins.

I was taught to copy the whole area tfc list into the log.

trotterdotpom
21st November 2008, 10:54
My first call sign was MAWW - the trawler Ross Polaris, sounded good on RT - Mike Alpha Whisky Whisky.

I may have copied the whole Portishead traffic list out once, not sure now, but if I did, I quick smart realised the folly of that. I was getting ready for the paperless office. I rarely did, but if you missed your callsign, you could always call them up and ask QRU?

John T.

NoMoss
21st November 2008, 11:00
My first call sign was MAWW - the trawler Ross Polaris, sounded good on RT - Mike Alpha Whisky Whisky.

I may have copied the whole Portishead traffic list out once, not sure now, but if I did, I quick smart realised the folly of that. I was getting ready for the paperless office. I rarely did, but if you missed your callsign, you could always call them up and ask QRU?

John T.

Having worked at Burnham I can assure you your ears must have been burning if you called to ask QRU? soon after a traffic list.

trotterdotpom
21st November 2008, 11:28
I would have given it at least 5 minutes - sometimes other things cropped up!

John T.

Baulkham Hills
21st November 2008, 12:48
A 1927 Lloyds Calendar shows Maliin Head as GMH, and has the call GRL as allocated to Fishguard.[/QUOTE]


Malin Head and Valentia coast stations were run by the UK GPO
until 1950, in that year the operation of these stations was taken over by the Irish authorities with Irish callsigns.

NoMoss
21st November 2008, 13:21
I would have given it at least 5 minutes - sometimes other things cropped up!

John T.


LOL Tell me about it!

benjidog
21st November 2008, 19:37
I have just purchased a first edition of the International List of Shp Stations published by The International Office of the Telegraph Union in Feb 1929. No use for the query in this thread but if anyone wants information about call signs etc. for ships around at that time feel free to send me a PM and I will look it up for you.

The 876 page book consists mainly of a large table with the following information against each station:

Name of station
Call Sign
Country
Wave (Type and Frequency)
Normal power of radiation in metre-amperes
Height of aerial an intensity of the current at base
Service - Nature and hours of service
Charges
Administration or private enterprise to which accounts must be addressed
RemarksPerhaps one of the resident Marconi-wallahs can explain what the following entries mean:


Type column mean - A1, A2, B
Service Nature column - PG, P, O, PR
Hours of service column - X, Z1, Z2, N

Rhodri Mawr
21st November 2008, 21:50
Type column mean - A1, A2, B
Service Nature column - PG, P, O, PR
Hours of service column - X, Z1, Z2, N

The terms A1 A2 and B refer to the technical characteristics of the
radio transmission taking place.

A1 - continuous wave (CW) i.e. unmodulated, just the on and off keying
of the operator.

A2 - modulated continuous wave (MCW) i.e. as above but an audio tone
was superimposed onto the signal. This gave a better signal which
was easier to read through interference.

B - this refers to the long disused damped waves. Have been disused for
more years than I care to remember.

As for the abbreviations in the hours of service and service nature columns,
these terms are no longer used. But I would have thought the publication
you have obtained would have given some explanation somewhere?

Cheers
RM

benjidog
21st November 2008, 22:47
Rhodri,

Thanks for the explanation of the "wave type" question. Is the damped wave type something to do with the early "quenched spark" transmitter?

I have also now found the answer to the "hours of service" question tucked away in a little corner of the book as you suggested:

The definitions given at this time were:

N - "Station open always - day and night"
O - "Station open for official correspondence only"
P - "Station open for public correspondence only"
PG - "Station open to public correspondence"
PR - "Station open to restricted public correspondence"
X - "Station not having fixed hours of service"
Y - "Station open from sunrise to sunset"
Z1 - "Station of the 2nd class with 8 hours of service"
Z2 - " Station of the 2nd class with 16 hours of service"

Ron Stringer
21st November 2008, 23:39
I was taught to copy the whole area tfc list into the log.

Me too. Didn't find it a chore, after all, what else was there to do at the beginning of a watch? Especially if you had traffic in the list at the Area station. It was never wise to guess when the blind transmission would reach your callsign, much easier to let it continue in the background and listen to 500k on the reserve receiver.

Radiomariner
22nd November 2008, 01:01
Me too. Didn't find it a chore, after all, what else was there to do at the beginning of a watch? Especially if you had traffic in the list at the Area station. It was never wise to guess when the blind transmission would reach your callsign, much easier to let it continue in the background and listen to 500k on the reserve receiver.

Traffic lists got longer and longer over time and could be massive at Christmas. Tuning into Portishead on an old CR300 receiver could be a bit nebulus. The transmitting station would broadcast a tape saying that it was splitting its lists into two halves the second half to be broadcast on a different frequency. It would then broadcast the word 'split' and the traffic list would commence with a GM** callsign. With much muttering I would franticly retune to the correct frequency in time to miss the bit of the list with my GB** or GC** callsign. It was handy at such times to have traffic to send, SVC messages or TR's etc. thus having an excuse for a contact avoiding the embarresment of the QRU?

Portishead was a very busy station and did not tolerate inexperienced radio operators. A bit of a bully I thought.

However, later in life after working for a government organisation much "slicker" than GKA, operating morse at speeds often over 35 words per minute, I found GKA to be a bit of a pussy cat. (Better radio equipment may have helped a bit in this respect)

Alan

R651400
22nd November 2008, 04:33
GKL aka GKA was probably the slickest maritime HF station ever.
There has been discussion on previous threads about automatic morse for the press but all Area 1 tfc list and tfc broadcasts were on a straightforward morse key, 20 to 25 wpm being the norm as per PMG2 and PMG1 requirement. In the early days bugs and el-keys were not only frowned upon but also banned, though this could have changed in later years.

ernhelenbarrett
22nd November 2008, 05:48
Re "M" Callsigns I sailed on two with Marconi one being British Gratitude/MAGQ
and Karanja/MACS of B.I. on the India/East Africa/South Africa run. One of Burns Philp ships out here in the Land of OZ was Mailata/MSLQ
Ern Barrett

ernhelenbarrett
22nd November 2008, 06:07
Further to my remarks on "M" C/signs does anyone out there remember
the Callsign of Palamcotta of British India. It was my first B.I. ship but cant remember the C/S, think it was GNPF or GPNF Or GFPN its the only ship in my 45+ years at sea whose C/S I cant remember. Could be cos Marconi said I was doing a 3 month trip to VWB and back home for leave and I got back about 5 years later!!
Ern Barrett

Tai Pan
22nd November 2008, 09:31
My first call sign was MAWW - the trawler Ross Polaris, sounded good on RT - Mike Alpha Whisky Whisky.

I may have copied the whole Portishead traffic list out once, not sure now, but if I did, I quick smart realised the folly of that. I was getting ready for the paperless office. I rarely did, but if you missed your callsign, you could always call them up and ask QRU?

John T.

That must rank as a crime equal to treason. hang him Mr Christian.

Roger Bentley
22nd November 2008, 11:40
According to LLoyds Register 1950-51 the callsign was G F N B. This is the ship built in 1945 and owned by BI. Regards

hawkey01
22nd November 2008, 12:47
I was taught that we had to copy the whole tfc list from the relevant area station. However when I was foreign flag I only copied the C/S around me and only logged anything that was relevant to my station. I did include SP's and always signed on off with the AA ck and off or AA Ckd and on. My foreign flag CS was 6ZDC so I had a good long wait when the foreign list from GKA or SVA was bdcast.

Ref Alan's comments - having worked in both the services mentioned I can assure you that there were plenty of us at GKA who could work at high speed. However that was not of much use when QSO with some poor young Jnr or some of the less well trained Foreign flag RO's. We were certainly not bullies as stated and when you have or had possibly several hundred ships waiting to be worked there was not too much time for the less capable but we always tried to be as helpful as possible. I also remember working within the other service with RO's who could take at speeds of upto 40 even through QRM - they were odd. Also several who could hold a conversation with you at the same time as taking high speed morse.

Malcolm - you are of course correct about the Bug/Auto keys. However from around 1970 we were allowed to use these keys but we had to sit a test before we were allowed to use them on air. By the end, all operating points were fitted with Katsumi autokeys and handkeys.

I will always respond to comments about GKA as it was without a doubt the BEST HF Stn in the WORLD.

Hawkey01

K urgess
22nd November 2008, 13:17
I used to copy up to my callsign and possibly a few past it after my junior time of copying it all.
OK when my callsign was GBLV but a bit long winded when it was MGCV.
I gave up when I sailed on ZCVO and since I didn't get into trouble for it that's what I did from then on.
Portishead was Portishead. What more can you say. (?HUH)
They were so efficient that the slightest hiccough used to get us upset and even if it was our own fault they got blamed for it.
I remember losing patience when I couldn't get through because someone on my calling frequency had so much power nobody could hear me. I even took to monitoring my call to try and get a word in edgewise.

R651400
22nd November 2008, 15:02
Malcolm - you are of course correct about the Bug/Auto keys. However from around 1970 we were allowed to use these keys but we had to sit a test before we were allowed to use them on air. By the end, all operating points were fitted with Katsumi autokeys and handkeys.
The bugs only came out at night Neville. Don Mulholland's attitude must have softened considerably when he took over the helm. I don't remember the GKA operating bays having sidetone, neither did any of the coast stations or ships I sailed on.

hawkey01
22nd November 2008, 16:56
I think that it was a case of more and more RO's wanting to use the auto/bugs. There were obviously a nucleus who never ventured into the auto field. I think that we all occasionally reverted to the manual key, just for a change of scene as it were. The station had sidetone by then as did the c/stns. There were just too many of us to rely on the keying light.

Hawkey01

Rhodri Mawr
22nd November 2008, 20:18
[QUOTE=benjidog;266925]Rhodri,

Thanks for the explanation of the "wave type" question. Is the damped wave type something to do with the early "quenched spark" transmitter?

[QUOTE]

Spot on, Benji. It did refer to the old spark-gap transmitters which would have been the type aboard the Titanic on that famous night.

Cheers
Rhodri

Tai Pan
23rd November 2008, 11:02
No question Portishead was the best, however as a lad before I found out, I used to imagine rows of hi teck receivers with automatic searching, bit disappointed to find out they used cr300 just like me. Another imagination was Vizagapatam, a saviour in the Indian Ocean for the 1800z obs message, i had visions of a rattan hut on the top of a mountain with a long wire stretched out to a palm tree, with a lad on a bike to cycle down to the local post office with the msg. anybody ever see it or know anything about it.

R651400
23rd November 2008, 12:35
Sorry to disillusion you JG. The receivers at GKL were CR100/CR150. My only conclusion they were headphones only and nice and quiet in a large operation area. The CR300 had a built in loudspeaker for shipboard operation. There may have been differences in sensitivity, s/n ratio and also frequency coverage between the models. Why not CR300?

ernhelenbarrett
24th November 2008, 04:39
Many thanks Roger for the Palamcotta's Callsign GFNB, I now have the C/signs for every ship I sailed in between 1947-1992
thanks again
Regards Ern Barrett

Roger Bentley
24th November 2008, 14:52
Many thanks Roger for the Palamcotta's Callsign GFNB, I now have the C/signs for every ship I sailed in between 1947-1992
thanks again
Regards Ern Barrett

No problem Ern, Glad to have filled in the missing gap. Best Regards, Roger

Naytikos
25th November 2008, 15:30
With ref. to the post by Hawkeye01:
My favourite trick was to copy the cw greek press from SVA on a greek typewriter whilst listening to the ball-by-ball on BBC WS 25011Mc/s and holding an R/T chat on VHF or 2Mc/s with someone on a nearby ship. Multi-tasking is just a new name for an old skill!

Of UK callsigns, I believe 'M' was always a UK prefix from when they were first standardised. I had MADX Benmacdhui, MWMN Shelldrake and Ross Jupiter whose c/s I forget.

Roger Bentley
25th November 2008, 19:12
Of UK callsigns, I believe 'M' was always a UK prefix from when they were first standardised. I had MADX Benmacdhui, MWMN Shelldrake and Ross Jupiter whose c/s I forget.[/QUOTE]

Ross Jupiter according to Lloyds 74-75 had the callsign Z S P E

Radiomariner
9th December 2008, 02:43
Ref Alan's comments - having worked in both the services mentioned I can assure you that there were plenty of us at GKA who could work at high speed. However that was not of much use when QSO with some poor young Jnr or some of the less well trained Foreign flag RO's. We were certainly not bullies as stated and when you have or had possibly several hundred ships waiting to be worked there was not too much time for the less capable but we always tried to be as helpful as possible. I also remember working within the other service with RO's who could take at speeds of upto 40 even through QRM - they were odd. Also several who could hold a conversation with you at the same time as taking high speed morse.

Hawkey01

I do not think I stated that GKA was a bully, I said that I "thought" it was as a young inexperienced R/O. This was qualified in the next sentance that started "However".
Neither did I state what services I worked for. It was not in the armed forces.

I guess I would be one of those you consider rather odd! I could not actually converse while receiving or sending morse, but I could listen to conversation around me and take instruction from collegues or supervisors acknowlidging with head or hand movements whilst receiving traffic at 35 wpm. I put this down to the idea that we are able to "duplex" our hearing, but not our speech.

I agree. GKA was indeed the most slick Maritime station in the world. But I think a radio station in Buckinghamshire handling a volume of traffic far greater than that of GKA was much slicker.

teb
5th January 2009, 06:50
[QUOTE=benjidog;266925]Rhodri,

Thanks for the explanation of the "wave type" question. Is the damped wave type something to do with the early "quenched spark" transmitter?

[QUOTE]

Spot on, Benji. It did refer to the old spark-gap transmitters which would have been the type aboard the Titanic on that famous night.

Cheers
Rhodri

Jusst been browsing old threads and in case of interest my first trip as 3rd ro was ong the Glaucus(Blue funnel) in 1943/4 and our emergenccy transmitter was quenched spark gap so you dont have to ggo back as far as Titanic-regards Teb

R651400
5th January 2009, 07:30
I agree. GKA was indeed the most slick Maritime station in the world. But I think a radio station in Buckinghamshire handling a volume of traffic far greater than that of GKA was much slicker.

I don't think you can compare the two. The latter you mentioned was operating on a one to one basis whereas GKA picked ships from calling bands running sometimes very long QRY lists meaning the ship's R/O had to be on his toes to keep his traffic window, similarly with area tfc broadcasts.
In terms of traffic volume the station you mention in Buckinghamshire may possibly have had the edge.

NoMoss
5th January 2009, 08:16
I don't think you can compare the two. The latter you mentioned was operating on a one to one basis whereas GKA picked ships from calling bands running sometimes very long QRY lists meaning the ship's R/O had to be on his toes to keep his traffic window, similarly with area tfc broadcasts.
In terms of traffic volume the station you mention in Buckinghamshire may possibly have had the edge.

Having worked at both, I agree, you can't compare them. The raison d'etre was completely different and watchkeeping requirements very different.

Reef.Runner
9th January 2009, 08:27
How far you going back R651400?

When I served 70/80's
Faslane MGJ
Plymouth MTI
Pitreavie MTO
Portsmouth can't quite remember, maybe MTN

Regards

MTI MTO and MTN confirmed, MTJ was Unst (Shetland Isles) - served at them all in the good old days!(K)

Sailtie
11th May 2009, 17:23
Think it was MAID when I was in her. Dairy Maid sticks in my memory. Could be wrong though it was a long time ago.

Lancastrian
11th May 2009, 18:41
Faslane Naval Radio was MGJ. Used to be on 3319 Khz CW.
RFA Warspite was MAAK.

RFA Warspite??

King Ratt
12th May 2009, 10:35
Thank you Lancastrian. Looks as if I need to correct my archives! RFA Airsprite it should read.

BrynW
13th May 2009, 00:34
Had call sign MPQQ aboard Tanker "Caltex Liverpool" in 1958/59 other Caltex shipsm also had M call signs
BrynW

radionev
14th May 2009, 09:20
I sailed on the MV Ixion (3) Blue Funnel and her call sign started with a "M" the full sign was "MLLR".

Just wondering if any one can put a light on when the UK used an "M" in a callsign? I can not find another "M".

She is Liverpool and UK flag. built 1951 tons gross 10,12514,000 HP speed 18kts Steam.
Sorry do not know her IMO number yet.

Thanks
Paul Baxter
My first trip (1958) Trainee R/O Benlomond call sign MXKR. What a wonderfull start to a life at sea.
Radionev

Roger Bentley
14th May 2009, 10:01
Can anyone please assist with call sign of ss KENTWOOD ex Empire Hearth
Ivor

Ivor Just been back tracking over this thread and according to Lloyds Register for 1950-51 the call sign of the Kentwood ex Empire Hearth was GIGB. The B call sign would have been a war time one. Regards, Roger

mikeg
14th May 2009, 17:25
My first trip (1958) Trainee R/O Benlomond call sign MXKR. What a wonderfull start to a life at sea.
Radionev

Shell's lightening vessel 'Halia' had a c/s quite close MXKN.

Mike

Moulder
14th May 2009, 17:59
Whilst at college (British School of Telegraphy - Earls Court) our course chartered a motor yacht from Chichester yacht club during the Easter break in 1970.
We had a brilliant time plodding around the Solent with two attempts across the channel on the 64 foot Brianna - will never forget her callsign - M E Z N - we certainly kept Niton busy with numerous radio checks - it was the first time live on air for many of us - even though it was a Sailor R/T set.

(Thumb)

sparkyjack
19th May 2009, 03:59
IF i remember rightly mv Devis MQFT Caledonia Star MARJ sailed on both in 60's cheers - sparkyjack

oldmarconiman
20th May 2009, 07:01
Ellerman's "T.S.M.V. City of Durban" had call letters MQZZ.

Mimcoman
21st May 2009, 19:18
I've forgotten the callsigns of most of the ships I signed on, but I seem to remember that Everard's flatiron "Battersea" had an M*** callsign...

Roger Bentley
21st May 2009, 19:32
I've forgotten the callsigns of most of the ships I signed on, but I seem to remember that Everard's flatiron "Battersea" had an M*** callsign...

She was MFSX - Cheers Roger

Riccarton
22nd May 2009, 15:14
Roger,
Maskeylia was MRSQ and Mahsud MALK

stocksie
23rd May 2009, 15:46
My "M" callsigns. ORCADES MABA 1951 Tilbury to Australia and cruises.
PERAK MSPP Ship delivery run Blyth (builders)to Singapore. Owners Straits
Steamship Malayan coaster. Presume allocated a Singapore c/s 1954.

holland25
23rd May 2009, 23:06
Saxon Star was MARX, always wanted to be in a traffic list with an American Ship with possibly KARL as a callsign.

ernhelenbarrett
24th May 2009, 06:04
Re "spark" sets, the emergency Tx on British Gratitude/MAGQ in 1954 was one of those wonder sets and the Emergency RX was a grey box with long coils calibrated in metres, to change freq you lifted the lid, pulled out the 600 metre coil and replaced it with the coil for say 512 Kcs also calibrated in metres. Only had to use the EMgcy TX once when the main TX threw a tempy wobbler, called SAG and was answered IMMEDIATELY as it blocked out every ships transmissions in the Baltic. Best Callsign I had was A3BB the Tauloto2 registered in Tonga
Regards Ern Barrett

Ivor Lloyd
24th May 2009, 06:26
Ivor Just been back tracking over this thread and according to Lloyds Register for 1950-51 the call sign of the Kentwood ex Empire Hearth was GIGB. The B call sign would have been a war time one. Regards, Roger


Roger
Have just picked your e-mail up
Thanks for info re Kentwood

Ivor

Mimcoman
24th May 2009, 15:00
She was MFSX - Cheers Roger
Thanks, Roger.

Clive Puttock
25th May 2009, 13:14
City of Durban / MQZZ
Another long wait for tfc fm GKA

johnvvc
25th May 2009, 14:40
Interesting thread…

Benjidog > I have just purchased a first edition of the International List of Ship Stations published by The International Office of the Telegraph Union in Feb 1929<

I have a collection of these books – ‘liberated’ from GLV when they shut shop…

Paul Baxter - 1983 ITU List of Call Signs shows ~200 M call signs. I sailed on MXFQ – but sadly can’t remember who the call sign belonged to – maybe someone out there may give my grey matter a little nudge – maybe the Susan Constant ???

Ref the comments on Portishead – I worked there for a while before moving on to GLV. Stayed at Highbridge with a nice family, spent my meagre earnings in the pubs in Burnham on Sea - happy memories. I don’t think that GKL were bullies – BUT – working them could be a bit daunting for a first tripper… I remember sailing on Elder & Fyffes’s Matina as Chief R/O. The first trip Junior was from Dublin. We were H8 but after a while we started doing 4 on 4 off and ‘obviously’ the Junior finished off doing the last watch. Anyway he came down to my cabin late one evening just as I was turning in, quite upset. Apparently he’d been working GKL and had problems sending a particular letter – whereupon GKL told him to try using the other foot !!! I was a bit longer in the tooth and merely told him what to say if it happened again !!!

Seem to remember copying GKL’s lists complete – though thinking about it can’t see any reason why one should have – I think it was just a case of doing what the Chief did when I was a Junior...

Interesting how reading these threads brings things back…

John

Dutchy62
2nd August 2009, 00:53
MMSQ - Surrey
MAEF - Sussex
MANZ - Hororata
MANK (appropriate?) - Gloucester

All NZS/Federal

rknibbs
2nd August 2009, 14:17
The last ship I sailed on was BP's British Trader/MTWG and the problem I had was that whenever I repeated the callsign - and regardless of the length of pause between each repetition - the respone would often be GMTW - I guess habit kicked in with the expectation that the callsign should begin with a `G'! The only other negative was having to wait to the end of traffic lists.

david.hopcroft
11th August 2009, 19:33
John

My 1963 'Dicky Dappel' lists MXFQ as the RIBBLEHEAD.

Talking of waiting till the end of the lists - I was on a Safmarine reefer call sign ZSHI . Bought myself a bug key !

David
+

johnvvc
12th August 2009, 08:32
Ah the Ribblehead!

I sailed on her, happy memories crossing the North Atlantic in winter heading for Seven Islands and copying ice reports (from VCS?).

Seem to remember the saloon was aft and going for meals was always a bit risky in bad weather! She might have been my first ship (I'll have to dig out my Discharge Book) and had a low freeboard and the slightest roll and she would take on water. As a first tripper it got me worried!!! (EEK)

Was this true of all ore carriers?

We had an ore carrier sked every afternoon on 2 mc/s R/T and I remember lots of names, some of them I see mentioned here, Rieuvaulx, Ravensworth, Rembrandt as well as loads of other company vessels.

Would be nice to hear from someone else who sailed on the Ribblehead.

Happy days tho'

John

bobharrison2002
12th August 2009, 09:30
Canberra - GBVC

QE II - GBTT

mikeg
12th August 2009, 09:55
Seem to remember copying GKL’s lists complete – though thinking about it can’t see any reason why one should have – I think it was just a case of doing what the Chief did when I was a Junior...

Interesting how reading these threads brings things back…

John

Wow, thanks John - I'd completely forgotten that. Same happened when I was a junior, the Chief also wanted the complete GKL traffic list copied - apart from the practice I begun to lookup the names of frequently listed ships. Remembering the first time you called on WT with the apprehension of correctly copying the reply. Funnily enough I had that same apprehension more recently in aviation the very first time I contacted Air Traffic control.

Robert Wheeler
13th August 2009, 17:29
Years passing by might be doing something to my memory but I'm sure there was an MXWD and an unlikely MNMM amongst the Clan fleet in the mid seventies. Hopefully someone might add some detail to this or just confirm the memory problem.

freddythefrog
13th August 2009, 18:19
I sailed on a Common Brothers tanker ----Border Terrier with callsign of MSDL.
cheers ftf

John Leary
13th August 2009, 18:48
Hello Robert
Reference your post # 124. My records show that in 1963 MXWD was allocated to Clan Menzies official number 300200 and MNMM to Clan Macintyre, official number 184963.
Regards
John

Billieboy
13th August 2009, 19:23
Only callsign I can remember is GXDR, sts "Llanishen".

K urgess
13th August 2009, 20:19
Robert
MNMM was the CLAN MACINTYRE
MXWD was the CLAN MENZIES
Cheers
Kris

PS Shucks beaten to it again (Sad)

Robert Wheeler
13th August 2009, 21:08
Thanks to you both for the Clan Line answer. I'd been quietly puzzling for a while after seeing the callsign thread.

K urgess
13th August 2009, 21:11
Just in case anyone is interested they were both OBS ships.
Cheers
Kris

w.craig
2nd October 2009, 20:37
First ship I sailrd on was the Drina, Royal Mail Lines, call sign MAIL it's one I've never forgotten.
Regards

landoburns
4th March 2010, 09:05
I was with IMR and in 1962 joined the Essex Trader/MYFT (Trader Navigation) in Hull and did about a year on her. There were not many ships after us in the area scheme traffic lists. I remember a female Russian surveyor coming on board in the Black Sea and exclaiming "My Foot!" when she saw the ship's callsign - quite surprising as she couldn't speak any other English!

Tony Breach
4th March 2010, 10:11
KENTWOOD (ex EMPIRE HEARTH) is in LR 56/7 as GIGB

5TT
5th March 2010, 16:38
I remember a female Russian surveyor coming on board in the Black Sea and exclaiming "My Foot!"

She may have been a bit MIFFED that you trod on her toe and didn't apologise?

= Adrian +

landoburns
6th March 2010, 08:46
She may have been a bit MIFFED that you trod on her toe and didn't apologise?

= Adrian +
She was gorgeous, I would definitely have kissed it better.....

Troppo
6th March 2010, 17:48
Was MMMM ever allocated, I wonder....?

Alan Couchman
6th March 2010, 22:31
Was MMMM ever allocated, I wonder....?

Hi Troppo,

Yes it has - check with the ITU: http://www.itu.int/cgi-bin/htsh/mars/ship_search.sh

LOREM: MMMM4
SOPHIE LOUISE OF PORTSMOUTH: MMMM9
THUMBELINA: MMMM5
WEIR MIST: MMMM2

All the best,
Alan C

Cisco
6th March 2010, 23:39
The Mxxx calls with a number seem to go to yachts... mine is MEPP5

Roger Bentley
7th March 2010, 14:39
Was MMMM ever allocated, I wonder....?

I don't know but GGGG was allocated to HMS Tactician as an international call sign. Regards, Roger

billyhearne
29th January 2012, 22:58
From the log/diary of my Late Uncle Jack Hearne marconi R/O
S/S Empire Treasure Port Line Ltd MANN
S/S Empire Gareth H Cockerline & co Ltd Hull MAFR
S/S Benjamin Sherburn Glen & Co Glasgow MAGC
S/S Empire Ely Common Bros Newcastle MAYM
MV Selworthy Beacon Ary Shipping Ltd London MBYK
S/S Browns Bay HP Lenigan & Co Belfast MAFG
MV City of Chester Ellermans Bucknall London MAHM
S/S Sugar Producer Silverton Services London MLNQ
MV Perang Elder Dempster Liverpool MNBB
S/S Ikauna BISN London MAOA
S/S Aronda BISN London MAFH
MV Streambank Andrew Weir & Co London MYCD

Troppo
30th January 2012, 02:09
I think that it was a case of more and more RO's wanting to use the auto/bugs. There were obviously a nucleus who never ventured into the auto field. I think that we all occasionally reverted to the manual key, just for a change of scene as it were. The station had sidetone by then as did the c/stns. There were just too many of us to rely on the keying light.

Hawkey01

I used an electronic key from my first ship to my last ship..... Still have the paddles (Bencher) connected to my amateur station.

Robert M Hughes
30th January 2012, 09:45
I sailed on the Stanvac S Africa MQMF built in Japan there were plenty of M's in the fifties as I recall.
On the 'Retainer' (small passenger vessel) her callsign was GGVC which I believe reflected her original connection with the RN - I seemed to get great response from UK radio stations.
Prefix GG did I think indicate RN ships - anyone know ?

Bob

trotterdotpom
30th January 2012, 09:46
It never entered my head to buy my own morse key. Just used whatever was there.

John T

Robert M Hughes
30th January 2012, 10:08
re 'Kentwood' one version was the France Fenwick collier with the callsign GIGB

Bob

R651400
30th January 2012, 10:17
A morse key is just pair of springed contacts making dots and dashes at the behest of the operator...
Like any concept the elitism came later with the German Junker as a typical example...
Mass produced Liberty ships with their RCA and Mackay consoles had no time for ball bearing style morse keys yet they fitted one of the most practical morse keys ever.

Allan Pugh
30th January 2012, 13:42
Sailed in Elder Dempster's "Onitsha" 1968/1969 - call sign MMLD

Allan

bill thompson
30th January 2012, 21:21
I was in Reardon Smith's "New Westminster City" for three years and I'm sure that her call sign was MWQD

charles henry
31st January 2012, 18:46
I sailed on the MV Ixion (3) Blue Funnel and her call sign started with a "M" the full sign was "MLLR".

Just wondering if any one can put a light on when the UK used an "M" in a callsign? I can not find another "M".

She is Liverpool and UK flag. built 1951 tons gross 10,12514,000 HP speed 18kts Steam.
Sorry do not know her IMO number yet.

Thanks
Paul Baxter

The UK always had the M as an option in its radio call sign block. Ships were using M calls since WW2 ended and possibly before that.
Chas

R651400
1st February 2012, 10:52
Not sure where the quotes above have been trawled from but the call sign of Ixion was MLLB.

Roger Bentley
1st February 2012, 16:19
Brocklebank's Marwarri was built in 1935 and her call sign was MBVY. the Titanic was MGY but I think that meant she was a Marconi equipment installed ship but probably also meant M was a UK allocation.

China hand
1st February 2012, 18:30
Westbank MAXW

R651400
2nd February 2012, 03:41
Can only remember one "M" call in Blue Funnel... Elpenor MRWT

Robert M Hughes
3rd February 2012, 13:23
When on the Highland Monarch UK/S.America run I used to hear MAVY quite a lot and can't remember the ship's name but think it might be a Blue Star line vessel. Anyone know?

Bob

John Leary
3rd February 2012, 15:51
Bob
My records show MAVY as Uraguay Star in 1963.
Regards
John

Robert M Hughes
4th February 2012, 08:53
Thanks John,

That explains it. Both ships were on the same run.

Bob

emcnet
20th February 2012, 00:11
Hi,

Served on British Justice and British Victory early 70's Call signs MPLS and MPLY or was it MPLY and MPLS ? Brain Gone too.

Rgds
Dave emcnet

John Leary
20th February 2012, 11:30
Hi Dave
I only have call-sign records for 1963. It shows British Justice and British Victory call-signs as GTCQ and MPLY respectively.
Hope that helps (at least in part).
Regards
John

R719220
20th February 2012, 11:46
John Leary

Should you have a moment, grateful you check in your 1963 records the call sign of Blue Star's Auckland Star.

I ask out of curiosity..... I did a leave relief on her in 1962. At that time she was registered in Hamilton, Bermuda and her call sign was ZFBQ. However, I believe that shortly after that she was re-registered in London and, obviously, was give a G (or M) call sign.

Minor point in the overall scheme of things but the only gap in my records.

Roger Bentley
20th February 2012, 13:13
Hi,

Served on British Justice and British Victory early 70's Call signs MPLS and MPLY or was it MPLY and MPLS ? Brain Gone too.

Rgds
Dave emcnet

Dave, Neither of these ships are listed in the 1974-75 Lloyds, they must have gone to the great breakers in the sky or sold. There are dozens of other BP British ........ but not your two. Regards, Roger

david.hopcroft
20th February 2012, 19:39
The October 1963 ITU List of Call Signs shows AUCKLAND STAR as GJNU

David
+

R719220
20th February 2012, 20:41
The October 1963 ITU List of Call Signs shows AUCKLAND STAR as GJNU

David
+

Thanks, David. Much appreciated!

dbayman
2nd March 2012, 10:21
My first solo trip was on the London Tradition MXYC , 1962 , it might as well have been MZZZ, I was nearly always last on GKA tfc list. A right pain during busy times. Needless to say the QSL was seldom sent till the next watch.

cheers
Bill

trotterdotpom
2nd March 2012, 10:39
Bill, don't know if you're aware or not but there is an LOF website at http://www.lof-news.co.uk/

Were you on the Tradition when she was a tanker or after the conversion to a bulk carrier? Six of those ships finished up at lay up in Greece (Tradition,Harmony, etc). They were all alongside each other and became known as "the sixpack".

Welcome to SN.

John T

dbayman
2nd March 2012, 11:01
yes John know about the LOF site.

The Tradition was a small tanker about 20k tons - the first Tradition.

I signed on in Rotterdam, did one trip to the Gulf then to Aus back to the gulf then to Italy back to the gulf then to Rotterdam and that was 6 months of my life away!

cheers
Bill

7912bob
12th January 2013, 01:31
I sailedon an ED mail ship APAPA c/s MACE i agree about being at the end of the traffic lists

charles henry
21st January 2013, 15:49
There were lots of vessels with "M" call signs in the fifties, I was on the Cape Hawke MAHB (Lyle Steamships) early fifties

Chas

Troppo
22nd January 2013, 00:44
I sailed in SSM's Cape Hawke in the 80's - she was GOXV

charles henry
22nd January 2013, 16:33
I sailed in SSM's Cape Hawke in the 80's - she was GOXV

Being old and out of date I am used to names and initials leave me feeling realy ancient. What the heck is "SSM"
Chas (Pint)

Varley
22nd January 2013, 17:20
Scottish Ship Management? formerly Lyles.

I wonder what truth there is in the runour that the name change was designed to fool clients into thinking they were the Diamond D. Otherwise THE Scottish Ships' managers!

jimg0nxx
22nd January 2013, 18:58
SSM also included Hungry Hogarths and Lambert Bros Temple Line?