British Kiwi

billyboy
8th December 2008, 23:32
I have a friend who was galleyboy on the Kiwis maiden voyage, he was with her when she was laid up in Barry. He had to go ashore for treatment for a badly cut foot. Anyone out there remember Robert Taylor (bob)
Trying to get him interested in this site.

billyboy
10th December 2008, 10:11
Robert Taylor (bob) joined the Kiwi on its maiden voyage. During a voyage he was peeling spuds. he stuck his knife into the deck and forgot it was there till he struck it with his foot. he had to go ashore for a while for treatment. cant remember where. I know he was a galley boy at the time. He stayed with the Kiwi till she laid up in Barry. Anyone out there remember him or have him on a photo?

Sarky Cut
10th December 2008, 10:33
Robert Taylor (bob) joined the Kiwi on its maiden voyage. During a voyage he was peeling spuds. he stuck his knife into the deck and forgot it was there till he struck it with his foot. he had to go ashore for a while for treatment. cant remember where. I know he was a galley boy at the time. He stayed with the Kiwi till she laid up in Barry. Anyone out there remember him or have him on a photo?

That explains the stain on the deck, there used to be a discussion about what had caused it for years in the bar.

Kiwi ended up on the North Sea as a rig support vessel, "Forties Kiwi" was used as a mobile crane to construct the early rigs.

On a technical point she was the last of the "Bird Boats" and was the only one to be AC. Was built to trial the latest technology, waste heat boilers and economisers for BP. Also had a turbo alternator for use at sea when the waste heat was in use.

The next vessels were the "Tree Boats" that used a similar system, these were later superceded by the "itys" and the "River Boats" that were designed from the outset to be UMS.

DAVELECKIE
10th December 2008, 20:12
That explains the stain on the deck, there used to be a discussion about what had caused it for years in the bar.

Kiwi ended up on the North Sea as a rig support vessel, "Forties Kiwi" was used as a mobile crane to construct the early rigs.

On a technical point she was the last of the "Bird Boats" and was the only one to be AC. Was built to trial the latest technology, waste heat boilers and economisers for BP. Also had a turbo alternator for use at sea when the waste heat was in use.

The next vessels were the "Tree Boats" that used a similar system, these were later superceded by the "itys" and the "River Boats" that were designed from the outset to be UMS.


One or two inaccuracies in the above.
The Kiwi as built for the Bird class was always a DC powered vessel.
The only Bird class vessel thst was AC was the Kestrel. She had a steam driven turbo alternator but unfortunately this was not that successful as it did not like the "wet" steam produced by the boiler.
The Kiwi became an AC powered vessel when it was converted for North sea duties although still retained her DC generators for her original DC motors etc.

Dave

spongebob
10th December 2008, 20:21
A name sake "Kiwi" was a Bird class mine sweeper or corvette built for the RNZN and powered by a triple expansion steam engine.
The Kestrel was a Devonport ferry. You never have your own name to yourself

Bob

arfabuck
11th December 2008, 19:08
A name sake "Kiwi" was a Bird class mine sweeper or corvette built for the RNZN and powered by a triple expansion steam engine.
The Kestrel was a Devonport ferry. You never have your own name to yourself

Bob

Ahh the dear old Kiwi! The graffiti artist in me plastered her name all over the fire tower in Bombay in 1967? Strange times, Pakistan and India were at war with each other again and here we were loading in Bombay and discharging at some God forsaken creek in the Ran of Kush for the Indian navy and then the rest was discharged in Karachi for the Pakistani Navy.(Whaaa)

Art

fishcake
11th December 2008, 23:23
Spent about a year on the Forties Kiwi (twoweeks on and two weeks off) Got paid extra North Sea bonus. shifts were 12hrs on and 12 hrs off. social life was non existant, spent most off time sleeping as there was no bar. First ship i'd been on wher e you could build a snowman with the snow that lay on the deck in winter. Food was great, steak every night, but on hindsight a really boring trip. As previously mentioned she was ac/dc. The engine room was basically original with dc motors running aux equipment backed up by a stand -by steam driven version. Two scotch boilers monitored by the boilerman all the time. The main engine was an appossed piston Doxford which I saw run once during my year onboard. Had a shot of starting it but failed, needed an octopus to get it going. New enginerooms were fitted forward the lenght of the ship to locate the diesel engines which ran the dynamic positioning system. The deck was covered in portacabins to house the contractors who were working on any of the four oil rigs Alpha' Beta , Charlie and Delta. A small Daphine helecopter would transfer them to the rigs each day. Newspapers were brought out each day . A workshop was fitted to the superstructure for BPX wher they could fasbricate all sorts of pipework etc and shot blast then paint. The new superstructure didn't seem to bend with the rest of the ship as welds could be seen opening and closing as the ship rolled. Comeraditity between BP shipping guys and BPX/Contractors was non existant.

billyboy
13th December 2008, 06:25
Sounds like the old Kiwi had a colorful life then Fishcake

Frankal
13th December 2008, 09:40
When i was there the lack of camaraderie was due to jealousy as the contractors were on "filmstar wages" and took the best seats in the cinema

Sarky Cut
13th December 2008, 09:46
One or two inaccuracies in the above.
The Kiwi as built for the Bird class was always a DC powered vessel.
The only Bird class vessel thst was AC was the Kestrel. She had a steam driven turbo alternator but unfortunately this was not that successful as it did not like the "wet" steam produced by the boiler.
The Kiwi became an AC powered vessel when it was converted for North sea duties although still retained her DC generators for her original DC motors etc.

Dave

Sorry mate age and all that! But I am trying Chief honest.:sweat:

billyboy
13th December 2008, 10:16
ha ha ha. My mom always said I was "very trying"...LOL

billyboy
21st December 2008, 10:27
[QUOTE=Sarky Cut;272331]That explains the stain on the deck, there used to be a discussion about what had caused it for years in the bar.



That Stain on the could well have been Bob Taylors accident. Apparantly it was a nasty cut, almost took his toes off. Sharp knife stuck in deck + flip flops = nasty accident.

Sarky Cut
21st December 2008, 10:53
Invention of the devil were flip flops. Many a sheet of paper was used writing up reports of accidents caused by the wearing of these bits of kit.

Slips, banged toes, cuts and bruises all could be avoided if they had been consigned to the correct place, in the skip.

But then I have my sensible hat on, when ever were sailors really sensible, its what makes us what we are.

billyboy
26th December 2008, 23:48
Common everyday footwear out here Sarky cut.
Had a few close calls wearing them while washing the car or welding. Always wear good quality strap on sandals when going out anywhere though.

arfabuck
27th December 2008, 06:33
Common everyday footwear out here Sarky cut.
Had a few close calls wearing them while washing the car or welding. Always wear good quality strap on sandals when going out anywhere though.

Where is there to go?

Palm oil or copra?

Looks nice but!

Art

Geoff_E
27th December 2008, 12:14
Robert Taylor (bob) joined the Kiwi on its maiden voyage. During a voyage he was peeling spuds. he stuck his knife into the deck and forgot it was there till he struck it with his foot. he had to go ashore for a while for treatment. cant remember where. I know he was a galley boy at the time. He stayed with the Kiwi till she laid up in Barry. Anyone out there remember him or have him on a photo?

I think I'd re-check that one Billy. I was cadet on the "Kiwi" in 1972 - 73 and she was Indian crewed then. I seem to remember, after a very sweaty month or two in/around the Gulf, we brought a cargo of Das Island crude round the Cape to the UK. I'm sure we dry-docked in Cardiff over Christmas/New Year '72 and then started carrying fuel oil.

My second Discharge Book (without the column for conduct) was issued there and the mug-shots taken outside the Smoke Room 'midships, with the main deck and aft accommodation as a backdrop.

kevjacko
27th December 2008, 18:03
When i was there the lack of camaraderie was due to jealousy as the contractors were on "filmstar wages" and took the best seats in the cinema

Hi Frankal

Was on her in South Shields dry dock in 82 (galley boy) when she was renamed Coltair and getting ready to go to the Magnus field. could'nt get off her quick enough, only did three or four trips. Catering super looked at me as if I was barking mad when I said I hated the north sea and wanted back deep water. Everyone was queuing up to try and get on the Iolar at the time. From what I can gather some of them are still there. Never mind got my wish and promptly sailed south to the Falklands after that.

twogrumpy
28th December 2008, 15:28
[QUOTE=Sarky Cut;272331][U]That explains the
That Stain on the could well have been Bob Taylors accident. Apparantly it was a nasty cut, almost took his toes off. Sharp knife stuck in deck + flip flops = nasty accident.

Seem to recall we used to call them Bombay Seaboots.
(Cloud)

Minto
3rd January 2009, 12:09
Cor! Thanks Daveleckie. I thought I was losing my marbles. The Kiwi was the only BP tanker I sailed on without A/C.