Pocket Book of Engineering

John Cassels
22nd December 2008, 09:16
For many years I've had a copy of Molesworth's Pocket book of Engineering
formulae 27th edition printed in 1914. Also included is a copy of the
preface to the first edition 1862.

It belonged to a brother in law of my grandmother.

It seems a facinating little book , quite small but still containing about
950 pages absolutly crammed full with engineering formula of all kinds ( eg.
formulae for calculating the required thickness of leather drive belting - this
in the "mill work"section.

Anyone ever heard of this book ?. Seems to me that the only interest that
could be shown for the book would be historical.

K urgess
22nd December 2008, 11:32
Yes, I've heard of it.
There's always an interest in old engineering books.
There are also several different versions.
I've got my Dad's well thumbed oily copy of Fowler's Engineer's pocket book from 1966, purely for sentimental reasons.
Also a 1942 copy of the three inch thick Machinery's Handbook but then I can't resist collecting books. (Sad)

GWB
22nd December 2008, 12:10
Never heard of it but would make fantastic reading.
GWB

andysk
22nd December 2008, 12:49
Somewhere I've a copy of a more recent edition, 1950's perhaps, by then published by Newnes I think.

andysk
22nd December 2008, 12:50
....... but then I can't resist collecting books. (Sad)

Is that a peculiarly Norwegian thing then Kris ? My ideal place would be a library with a bedroom attached, but that doesn't go down too well with the Mem !

K urgess
22nd December 2008, 16:33
There could be an element of that, Andy (EEK)
Mostly I blame the Memsahib who likened me throwing away a books to a historical burning.
Kris

surfaceblow
22nd December 2008, 20:44
One pocket book that I carried in my sea bag: Engineering Formulas by Kurt Gieck copyright 1976. The last time I used it on a ship was to calculate the remaining compression with a broken tie rod. And then the maximum safe speed that the Main Engine could run at with the broken tie rod removed.

Three days later ABS and B & W confirmed the speed that I told the Captain and office that we could safety run at.

We discover the broken tie rod when re-tensioning the tie rods. The hydraulic jack and tie rod shot up and stopped when all the slack of the hydraulic hose was paid out. The tie rod and jack then came back in place with a loud report. We ordered a new tie rod and sent the broken tie rod for repairs. We ended up staying at anchor for 27 days waiting for a tie rod.

jmcg
31st March 2009, 12:29
Have a number of ancient engineering books- attached as thumbnail is Preface to Sheddens Mechanical Rules and Tables 1901 edition . Price: 1 Shilling and Six Pence.

Preface is still valid today.

Referred to it extensively in the past.

J

Steve Hodges
15th May 2009, 22:22
These old reference books make fascinating reading. For the life of me I can't remember where I came across it, but I have a 1919 copy of " Munro's Marine Engineer's Annual Pocket Log and Diary" .
It contains such gems as tables of Egyptian weights & measures ( 6 Palms= 1 Pik , 86 Okes = 1 Kantar....), Weight of Coal Heaps in cubic yards & tons, Time Occupied in Course of Post from London ( Callao - 31 days via Panama....), and " Wrinkles for Marine Engineers Preparing for Examination".
The Table for Calculating Engineer's Wages goes up to the dizzy heights of 25 per month, and from this excellent volume the ship's engineer can learn that the weight of Carrara marble is 169.6 punds per cubic foot, that a Russian [I]verst[I] is two-thirds of a mile, that herrings are sold by the cran of 371/2 imperial gallons, that a bale of USA cotton wool averages 477 lbs., and that Cartwright's first patent for the steam power loom was taken out in 1785.
I love this old book..... somehow the world seemed a much more interesting place then!

vinnie05
16th May 2009, 17:38
Another old one. My late father was given a copy of "The Naval Constructor" by George Simpson from Tom Cato who was a lecturer in naval architecture in Newcastle back in the fifties (maybe someone remembers him). Published in 1919, its a fascinating book with some beautiful illustrations. Glad to have it in my collection.

eldersuk
16th May 2009, 22:25
Back in the mists of time when I first started my apprenticeship someone bought me an 'Engineer's Diary'. Needless to say I couldn't make head nor tail of it and looking at all the formulae etc. wondered if I had made a grave mistake in my choice of profession. Eventually some of them began to make sense, but only about seven years later when I was up to 3/E.

Derek

bri445
30th July 2009, 12:54
I've got quite a few old engineering books including this A5 one which has a very concise history section with numerous illustrations of marine, I.C., horse-driven, beam, railway, traction engines and windmills. Mine's 1954 but I assume it's been going for a long time.

chadburn
30th July 2009, 12:59
"The Engineer" use to be a very good series of publications.

albatross1923
30th July 2009, 20:02
For many years I've had a copy of Molesworth's Pocket book of Engineering
formulae 27th edition printed in 1914. Also included is a copy of the
preface to the first edition 1862.

It belonged to a brother in law of my grandmother.

It seems a facinating little book , quite small but still containing about
950 pages absolutly crammed full with engineering formula of all kinds ( eg.
formulae for calculating the required thickness of leather drive belting - this
in the "mill work"section.

Anyone ever heard of this book ?. Seems to me that the only interest that
could be shown for the book would be historical.

hELLO JOHN

I HAD THIS BOOK TO WHEN ISERVED MY TIME 7O YEARS AGO
WITH BARCLAY CURLES NORTH BRITISH DIESEL ENGINE WORKS
YOURS ALBATROSS 1923