Sivand

red devil
23rd December 2008, 17:00
Having seen some photographs of the "Sivand" in the gallery it reminded me of the unhappy accidents this ship had during her short life.
I was working at the Immingham oil terminal when she arrived in the early 1980's. She was the unfortunate vessel involved in the worst collision and pollution in the terminals 40 year history.

BillH
24th December 2008, 14:12
Having seen some photographs of the "Sivand" in the gallery it reminded me of the unhappy accidents this ship had during her short life.
I was working at the Immingham oil terminal when she arrived in the early 1980's. She was the unfortunate vessel involved in the worst collision and pollution in the terminals 40 year history.
I believe this is the vessel in question (from my records)

BRITISH NAVIGATOR (2) (1971 - 1976)

O.N. 341428. 108,531g. 82,576n. 215,139d. 1,069' 7"(BB) x 160' 0" x 62' 4".
Two, Westinghouse type steam turbines manufactured by the shipbuilder, double reduction geared to screw shaft. 30,000 shp.
Very Large crude carrier (VLCC)

7.3.1971: Launched by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Nagasaki (Yard No. 1674), for the BP Medway Tanker Company Ltd.

6.1971: Completed.

1976: Sold to the National Iranian Tanker Company, Iran, and renamed SIVAND.

At 13:30hrs local time -12.10.1984: Struck by a missile whilst off Kharg Island sustaining minor unreported damage.

15.10.1984: Whilst on a loaded voyage from Kharg Island to Sirri Island was attacked by Iraqi aircraft and set ablaze. Fire extinguished and vessel towed to Sirri Island for discharge and inspection. Laid up at Sirri Island.

7.5.1986: Arrived under tow at Kaohsiung for demolition.

Sarky Cut
24th December 2008, 14:23
I have been to Immingham a few times, was it really capable of taking a 250,000 tanker?

It must have been a tight squeeze for the older deeper vessels.

red devil
24th December 2008, 15:20
Yes the Immingham oil terminal(IOT) is capable of handling this size of tanker, in fact the largest has been almost 300,000 tons- not fully laden of course. This is due to the restricted draft in the Sunk channel.
Normally a VLCC would part discharge in Rotterdam and finish off at Immingham around 100 to 150,000 tons.Having said that they are huge ungainly things and wandering around the deck checking tanks on a night shift is pretty miserable!
The sad fact is large vessels like this manouvering in restricted waters which are often made worse by weather or tidal conditions are bound to run into trouble sooner or later. Such was the case with the Sivand.

Steve Woodward
24th December 2008, 17:38
The largest ship to date to visit Immingham Oil Terminal ( berth No1) is HERE (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=39471) and HERE (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=41106&nocache=1)

red devil
27th December 2008, 12:01
Crumbs. We have a pilot amongst our midst! I'd better not say too much about some of the ship handling I've seen!!!