BP Tankers

OllieUK
1st January 2009, 21:23
So what is left of the British Merchant Navy and BP Tanker crews. I understand that the new fleet of BP tankers fly the red duster and are registered in the I.O.M are they crewed with British Officers & Merchant Seamen?

IanB
1st January 2009, 23:12
Have worked on several discharges of BP tankers, British Unity, British Liberty etc.here at Bell Bay Tasmania For Mobil. Crews seemed to be mostly Australian.

red devil
2nd January 2009, 11:59
I've been onboard several E class ships, Ensign,Enterprise,Endurance etc and some are Indian officers and crew others a mixture of Brits and Europeans.
I'm afraid it's nothing like it was 40 years ago!

beverlonian
7th January 2009, 22:31
The last BP Tanker I saw was in Hong Kong in 1995 / 96. As she sailed past, I noted the name "British Success" and port of registry was Hamilton, Bermuda. The irony didn't escape me.

Bob Fleming
7th March 2009, 21:21
The fleet managed from the UK, under the BP Shipping ISM DoC, stands at about 55 ships today. All are entered on the British Register of Shipping, with the vessels principally registered at the port of Douglas in the IoM, about 3 are registered in London, 1 in Lerwick and 1 in Hamilton Bermuda.

The fleet is manned in two ways with the fleet split approx 50/50.
One group is European Officers (mainly Brits and Irish with Polish) + Fillipino Ratings.
The second group is completely Indian, Officers and Ratings.
All officers are employed by BPMS (BP Maritime Services), a wholey owned BP group company.

There are over a 120 cadets in the system at present.

Satanic Mechanic
11th March 2009, 02:21
Which is another way of saying 'mostly Indian'

Your forgot to mention where everyone is employed from and how many work for BP Shipping with all its associated benefits

Nothing against Indians of course, but even the British Officers are mostly recent recruits. Having a look in the fleet list there is hardly a name remaining from the 90's early 2000's , if I was of a suspicious mind I would have said it was like constructive dismissal - it certainly felt like it. When the company come out and say "If you don't like it leave" you tend to get the impression your not wanted anymore. (Cloud)

"Well done lads without you would could not have pulled this company round - great team effort - now **** off" closely followed unfortunately by

"we've had a fatality"

To be fair of course there was always going to be a problem with the fleet expansion , they had to look at going much more overseas for their manning, but the way we were getting treated was beyond belief at times and from supernintendos who had done a dogs watch gone into the office and got on the gravy train- obviously some were very good , but some should not be allowed out alone and in a number of cases were actually reasons for people leaving.

twogrumpy
11th March 2009, 10:12
Which is another way of saying 'mostly Indian'

Your forgot to mention where everyone is employed from and how many work for BP Shipping with all its associated benefits

Nothing against Indians of course, but even the British Officers are mostly recent recruits. Having a look in the fleet list there is hardly a name remaining from the 90's early 2000's , if I was of a suspicious mind I would have said it was like constructive dismissal - it certainly felt like it. When the company come out and say "If you don't like it leave" you tend to get the impression your not wanted anymore. (Cloud)

"Well done lads without you would could not have pulled this company round - great team effort - now **** off" closely followed unfortunately by

"we've had a fatality"

To be fair of course there was always going to be a problem with the fleet expansion , they had to look at going much more overseas for their manning, but the way we were getting treated was beyond belief at times and from supernintendos who had done a dogs watch gone into the office and got on the gravy train- obviously some were very good , but some should not be allowed out alone and in a number of cases were actually reasons for people leaving.

From all that I have seen on this site, it would appear that I made the wise move when I departed in 86.
If "The Flag" is a true reflection of life with BPTC or whatever they call it these days, God help us, what a load of PC claptrap.
(Read)

beng
10th November 2009, 13:25
what do you mean constructive dismissal were british sea staff made redundant or numbers deliberatley reduced? i.e. were there cutbacks when they took on indian manning. I always thought that the indian manning took up the excess.

Its sad to see fatalities they had a good record for a long time.

R58484956
10th November 2009, 13:34
Greetings Beng and welcome to SN. Bon voyage.

PeterDD
14th November 2009, 20:15
I served with BP Shipping from leaving school in 1965 until that fateful day in April 1986. At home on leave and watching the 6 oclock News when it was announced that BP had made all its seagoing staff redundant! I did not think they meant me - but next morning in the post was the letter confirming that my services had been terminated. The best kept secret ever in BP House - only about 3 people knew apparently. Fortunately all turned out well in the end so maybe it was a blessing in disguise.

Peter