More daft things

japottinger
7th January 2009, 18:25
When I joined the Maihar (I) in Glasgow in May 1958 she was still having her rebuild finished by Stephens of Linthouse. I recall the first time we turned over her triple expansion engine there was water spraying everywhere. Unfortunately the plumbers had run a pipe of cooling water to the guide supports straight through the path of the Edwards air pump levers at fore end of the engine. As soon as it swung up and down it sliced through this pipe with the predictable results.
When we questioned the Stephens staff about it they said " how were we to know that b--- great thing was going to move up and down"

sidsal
8th January 2009, 20:45
Great story. I have an abiding memory of seeing Maihar's "up and downer" going and the oiler with his can following the pistons. There's nothing like the "thump" - "thump" of such engines. You really feel you are going places.

japottinger
8th January 2009, 21:20
Not many ships where you could actually watch the turning of the crankshaft, as they used to say homeward bound " every turn of the screw takes me nearer to you!"

We had a top and bottom tael wallah on each watch in the engine room on the Maihar, the poor bottom lad had to oil all the crankpins etc and hoof the water pails to top up the eccentric strap pans, plus check th tunnel bearings The top man had to oil the crossheads, many an oil can was flattened when mistimed and caught between the crosshead and the underside of the cylinders. A fixed amount of lub oil was allocated to each, in a small brass tank with locks, some found a way to broach the locks and draw of some for his own use, many times I had to step in and separate two fueding tael wallahs! Happy days!

Masirah
9th January 2009, 11:37
In Mandasor anchored off Chittagong one sunny afternoon several of us, including the 3rd engineer, were chatting abreast of number 4 hatch with the afternoon cuppa when someone noticed that we were moving. I have never seen our engineer move so fast. Apparently there was a leak of steam into the cylinders which was ultimately enough to set them in motion. The judicious application of the 28lb hammer sort the problem out and sanity returned. That was until finally alongside and the East Pakistan Gov. decided to hold an air raid blackout practice one night. But thats another story.

japottinger
10th January 2009, 13:19
In Mandasor anchored off Chittagong one sunny afternoon several of us, including the 3rd engineer, were chatting abreast of number 4 hatch with the afternoon cuppa when someone noticed that we were moving. I have never seen our engineer move so fast. Apparently there was a leak of steam into the cylinders which was ultimately enough to set them in motion. The judicious application of the 28lb hammer sort the problem out and sanity returned. That was until finally alongside and the East Pakistan Gov. decided to hold an air raid blackout practice one night. But thats another story.

Odd, they must have had the reverse gear links set in either ahead or astern position for the engine to start up if steam was leaking into the HP cylinder. Normally when stopping the engine the reversing gear mechanism would always be put back to "neutral" position.