Credit Card scammers afoot! (merged threads)

benjidog
15th February 2006, 10:35
I got the attached warning from my HR department and I am passing it on as a warning to UK members - though it may apply equally elsewhere:

One of our employees was called on Wednesday from "VISA", and another on Thursday from "MasterCard". Note the callers do not ask for your card number; they already have it. The scam works like this: Person calling says, "This is (name), and I'm calling from the Security and Fraud Department at VISA. My Badge number is 12460. Your card has been flagged for an unusual purchase pattern, and I'm calling to verify. This would be on your VISA card that was issued by (name of bank). Did you purchase an Anti-Telemarketing Device for 249.99 from a Marketing company based in (name of any town or city)?"

When you say "No" the caller continues with, "Then we will be issuing a credit to your account. This is a company we have been watching and the charges range from 150 to 249, just under the 250 purchase pattern that flags most cards. Before your next statement, the credit will be sent to (gives you your address), is that correct?" You say "yes".

The caller continues - "I will be starting a Fraud investigation. If you have any questions, you should call the 0800 number listed on the back of your card and ask for Security. You will need to refer to this Control Number. The caller then gives you a number. Do you need me to read it again?"

Here's the IMPORTANTpart on how the scam works. The caller then says, "I need to verify you are in possession of your card". He'll ask you to "turn your card over and look for some numbers". There are 7 numbers; the first 4 are part of your card number, the next 3 are the security Numbers that verify you are the possessor of the card. These are the numbers you sometimes use to make Internet purchases to prove you have the card. The caller will ask you to read the 3 numbers to him. After you tell the caller the 3 numbers, he'll say, "That is correct, I just needed to verify that the card has not been lost or stolen, and that you still have your card. Do you have any other questions?"

After you say No, the caller then thanks you and states, "Don't hesitate to call back; if you do", and hangs up. You actually say very little, and they never ask for or tell you the Card number.

But after we were called on Wednesday, we called back within 20 minutes to ask a question. Are we glad we did! The REAL VISA Security Department told us it was a scam and in the last 15 minutes a new purchase of 249.99 was charged to our card.

Long story made short - we made a real fraud report and closed the VISA account. VISA is reissuing us a new number. What the scammers want is the 3-digit PIN number on the back of the card. Don't give it to them. Instead, tell them you'll call VISA or Mastercard directly for verification of their conversation. The real VISA told us that they will never ask for anything On the card as they already know the information since they issued the card!

If you give the scammers your 3 Digit PIN you think you're receiving a credit. However, by the time you get your statement you'll see charges for purchases you didn't make, and by then it's almost too late and/or more difficult to actually file a fraud report.

Brian

John_F
15th February 2006, 10:42
Benjidog,
Many thanks for that - hadn't heard of that one before.
Kind regards,
John F

Peter Fielding
15th February 2006, 10:57
Thanks for the warning, Benjidog. What will the bastards think of next?

ruud
15th February 2006, 11:06
Ahoy,

All bank/credit-card bankings have warned people "Never give Cardnumber or Digit PIN[backside 3 numbers]" not by email or phonecall, so better not respond on these emails.
Easy as that!!!!!

Bob S
15th February 2006, 11:10
I've always wondered why this 3 digit code is so important, after all, if you buy something over the phone, you are asked for the code to prove you have the card but once you do that, the person on the end of the line also then has it and if they are not trustworthy, how many more people get to know it?

R58484956
15th February 2006, 16:01
Thanks for the warning.

Tmac1720
15th February 2006, 16:18
Benji, you are a true gent, thank for the heads up. Hope you realise that's the Hipsnos little scam blown out of the water (LOL)

rainbow
15th February 2006, 23:59
Thanks for the warning, Benjidog.
How do these creatures to get hold of the 20 digit number? Are they gathering numbers at the place of issue (Bank) or do they pick up financial statements that are discarded by the account holder in the domestic recyclable refuse, paper, cans, etc.
It's worthwile buying and regularly using a shredder for ALL personal documents that are going to be thrown out.

nigelcollett
16th February 2006, 10:05
Another Thanks

BE ALERT

NigelC

Peggy747
17th February 2006, 10:54
Thanks for the warning Benji.

Peter (Applause)

R798780
17th February 2006, 11:30
On holiday in the Canaries a couple of weeks ago I was attempting to buy a camera.

I was a little surprised to find the shop using a three layers of paper voucher type of transaction, and more surprised when the vendor read the security digits on the reverse and jotted them on the Mastercard voucher. The sale faltered for other reasons and we left the shop.

Slowly, ever so slowly, I smelt a rat and a quickish phone call cancelled the card. Not sure what the outcome will be, the call centre was offshore with highly accented English, and it's a long time since I've been to Calcutta or sailed with Indian crews.

It may all have been innocent, but it may just be another twist to the scam.

All thanks to Brian for the posting, I'm even more certain now that I did the right thing.

Paul UK
17th February 2006, 18:51
They can get your details from a scanner fitted to the front of a cash machine or even a second machine at a till in the restaurant etc.

Watch word is keep and eye on your card and anything that looks out of place on any machine dont use it and find another.

Paul

cboots
18th February 2006, 05:51
I got a rather sophisticated version of the old Nigerian scam, requesting bank details, on an email the other day. It was from a guy purporting to be a senior official in a London bank and was complete with a London addressing, although he had got the post code wrong, but one would have to be a Londoner probably to spot that, and the spelling and grammer was reasonably good. So as well as new ones coming along each day, all the old ones are still being worked too. Just remember, if you think you spell a rat it is probably because there is a rat behind it.
CBoots

raybnz
18th February 2006, 09:01
I have just cancelled a email from Paypal wanting me to up date my Credit card Info. I had one simular some months back and when I checked with Paypal the ensured me they would never email a request for such particulars.

Todays email was deleted as usual.

alan williams
10th April 2006, 19:11
I was sent this e-mail by my nephew who is in metopolitan police[THIS IS GENUINE ) CREDIT CARD FRAUD:
>
> The following was given to me by someone who works for Barclays and has dealings with Barclaycard.
>
> By understanding how the VISA & MasterCard Telephone Credit Card Scam works, you'll be better prepared to protect yourself.
>
> One of our employees was called on Wednesday from "VISA", and I was called on Thursday from "MasterCard". Note, the callers do not ask for your card number; they already have it.
>
> The scam works like this: Person calling says, "This is (name), and I'm calling from the Security and Fraud Department at VISA. My Badge number is 12460. Your card has been flagged for an unusual purchase pattern, and I'm calling to verify. This would be on your VISA card that was issued by (name of bank). Did you purchase an Anti-Telemarketing Device for �249.99 from a Marketing company based in (name of any town or city)?"
>

When you say "No" the caller continues with, "Then we will be issuing a credit to your account. This is a company we have been watching and the charges range from �150 to �249, just under the �250 purchase pattern that flags most cards. Before your next statement, the credit will be sent to (gives you your address), is that correct?"
>

You say "yes". The caller continues - "I will be starting a Fraud investigation. If you have any questions, you should call the 0800 number listed on the back of your card and ask for Security. You will need to refer to this Control Number. The caller then gives you a 6 digit number. "Do you need me to read it again?"
>
> Here's the IMPORTANT part on how the scam works. The caller then says, "I need to verify you are in possession of your card". He'll ask you to "turn your card over and look for some numbers". There are 7 numbers; the first 4 are part of your card number, the next 3 are the security numbers that verify you are the possessor of the card. These are the numbers you sometimes use to make Internet purchases to prove you have the card. The caller will ask you to read the 3 numbers to him.
>

After you tell the caller the 3 numbers, he'll say, "That is correct, I just needed to verify that the card has not been lost or stolen, and that you still have your card. Do you have any other questions?"



After you say No, the caller then thanks you and states, "Don't hesitate to call back; if you do", and hangs up.



You actually say very little, and they never ask for or tell you the Card number. But after we were called on Wednesday, we called back within 20 minutes to ask a question. Are we glad we did! The REAL
> VISA Security Department told us it was a scam and in the last 15 minutes a new purchase of �249.99 was charged to our card.
>
>Long story made short - we made a real fraud report and closed the VISA account. VISA is reissuing us a new number. What the scammers want is the 3-digit PIN number on the back of the card. Don't give it to them. Instead, tell them you'll call VISA or Master card directly for verification of their conversation. The real VISA told us that they will never ask for anything on the card as they already know the information since they issued the card! If you give the scammers your 3 Digit PIN you think you're receiving a credit. However, by the time you get your statement you'll see charges for purchases you didn't make, and by then it's almost too late and/or more difficult to actually file a fraud report.
>
>What makes this more remarkable is that on Thursday, I got a call from a "Jason Richardson of MasterCard" with a word-for-word repeat of the VISA scam. This time I didn't let him finish. I hung up! We filed a police report, as instructed by VISA. The police said they are taking several of these reports daily! They also urged us to tell everybody we know that this scam is happening.
>

Please pass this on to all your family and friends. By informing each other, we protect each other.

I AM SORRY TO BE THE BEARER OF THESE NOTICES BUT IT IS A SIGN OF THE TIMES WE LIVE IN

Subject: Mail Scam


This has been passed to me from a Police Colleague and is genuine.
Please pass this on, it might save you some money,

For your information

If you receive a card through your door from a company call PDS (Parcel Delivery Service) saying that they have a parcel awaiting delivery instructions and can you contact them on 0906 6611911

DO NOT call the number as this is a mail scam originating from Belize

If you call the number and you start to hear a recorded message you will already have been billed 15 for the phone call.

If you do receive a card with these details, then please contact
ICTIS at http://www.icstis.org.uk
or your local trading standards office.

This is a genuine scam.

ICTIS have the following information about this number.
This is a card posted through your letter box from PDS Parcel Delivery
suggesting that they were unable to deliver a parcel and to call the premium rate number in question. This service costs 1.50 per minute.
This service is under investigation by ICSTIS.

Please be aware of this scam and forward this information to as many as possible.



Should you receive a card from this company please follow the above instructions





(Applause)

R651400
9th January 2009, 14:13
I'm sure this has been covered before. A tad verbose but forewarned is forearmed..

Quote from recently received email
The scam works like this:
Person calling says, "This is (name), and I'm calling from the Security and Fraud Department at VISA. My badge number is 12460.
Your card has been flagged for an unusual purchase pattern, and I'm calling to verify.This would be on your VISA card which was issued by (name of bank). Did you purchase an Anti-Telemarketing Device for 497.99 from a Marketing company based in London ?" When you say "No", the caller continues with, "Then we will be issuing a credit to your account. This is a company we have been watching and the charges range from 297 to 497, just under the 500 purchase pattern that flags most cards. Before your next statement, the credit will be applied to your account. I just need to confirm your address (gives you your address), is that correct?"
You say "yes". The caller continues - "I will be starting a fraud investigation. If you have any questions, you should call the number listed on the back of your card and ask for the Security & Fraud Department.
You will need to refer to this Control Number. The caller then gives you a 6 digit number. "Do you need me to read it again?"
Here's the IMPORTANT part on how the scam works the caller then says,"I need to verify you are in possession of your card." He'll ask you to "turn your card over and look for some numbers." There are 7 numbers; the first 4 are part of your card number, the next 3 are the security numbers that verify you are the possessor of the card. These are the numbers you sometimes use to make Internet purchases to prove you have the card. The caller will ask you to read the 3 numbers to him. After you tell the caller the 3 numbers, he'll say, "That is correct, I just needed to verify that the card has not been lost or stolen, and that you still have your card. Do you have any other questions?" After you say, "No," the caller then thanks you and states, "Don't hesitate to call back if you do", and hangs up.
You actually say very little, and they never ask for or tell you the Card number. But after we were called, we called back within 20 minutes to ask a question. Are we glad we did! The REAL VISA Security Department told us it was a scam and in the last 15 minutes a new purchase of 497.99 was charged to our card.
Long story - short - we made a real fraud report and closed the VISA account.
VISA is reissuing us a new number.
What the scammers want is the 3-digit PIN number on the back of the card. Don't give it to them.
Instead, tell them you'll call VISA or Master Card directly for
verification of their conversation. The real VISA told us that they will never
ask for anything on the card as they already know the information since they issued the card! If you give the scammers your 3 Digit PIN Number, you think you're receiving a credit. However, by the time you get your statement you'll see charges for purchases you didn't make, and by then it's almost too late and/or more difficult to actually file a fraud report.
Unquote

Geoff_E
9th January 2009, 14:22
Thank you for the warning. I've not heard of this angle before!

R651400
9th January 2009, 14:30
Brian (Benjidog), Thanks for the merger, was sure I had seen something similar.
I could have nutshelled by saying that anyone who discloses the magical three numbers on their card to person or persons unknown will be a very sorry chappie on their next statement.

ROBERT HENDERSON
9th January 2009, 15:20
If I wish to purchase anything on the Internet I always phone the company and ask them to accept a cheque, I will not give my card details by telephone or over the net, irrespective how secure a site is supposed to be, you do not know the person at the other end.
Last year ITV ran a documentary regarding these various scams. In the Indian call centres computer engineers were taking details from hard drives and selling the information on.

Regards Robert

R651400
9th January 2009, 15:42
I shop and bank on the internet. By a few simple rules, to date I've never experienced a problem.
Most details are obtained by scam experts thru negligence on the part of the shopper/surfer/browser. Phishing as a typical example.
So how do we protect ourselves if we don't know how a hacker or phisher can obtain our details?
Can I recommend a simple and free program I bring to bear after each internet monetary transaction which deletes all my .tmp files and during it's finalisation temporarily disconnects me from isp.
It's called "cleanup" it's free, even to giving your pc the laxative it requires.
There are other protective measures eg Mozilla Firefox instead of Internet Explorer.
I use a free av and firewall program but confess to paying for anti-trojan in the shape of "Webroot," given the highest rating by PC world when I took it out some four years ago.
p.s. Should I be giving away all those details on an open website??

Lksimcoe
9th January 2009, 22:04
When I went to the UK this past May, I filled up at a gas station just outside of Heathrow. By the time I got to Glastonbury a few hours later, I had a message that my VISA card had been scammed. Not a great way to start a vacation, but they replaced it quickly, thus saving my single malt budget.