city of bradford

decembersgem
19th January 2009, 23:27
heelo everyone i am currently researching my family tree and found out that my great grandad died on a ship called the city of bradford in the second world war. his name was harry ibbotson and apparently the ship was torpedo'd and sank with crew on board and is under the sea still? is this info correct and how can i seek records of the ships crew i am really interested in this and would appreciate ANY help many many thanks xx

R58484956
20th January 2009, 10:34
Greetings Decembersgem and welcome to SN on your first posting. Enjoy the site and bon voyage.

K urgess
20th January 2009, 16:03
Welcome aboard from East Yorkshire.
I'm sure someone in the crew will be able to help.
Meanwhile a brief history of the ship is here on Miramar.
http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz/ship/show/292975
Explore our ship and enjoy the voyage.

bert thompson
20th January 2009, 16:29
Welcome to this great site. Sure someone will be able to assist you
Best wishes
Bert.

benjidog
20th January 2009, 22:08
Welcome from Lancashire.
I hope you will enjoy the site.

Steve Woodward
20th January 2009, 22:27
Welcome to SN from Suffolk, enjoy your time with us
Steve

billyboy
21st January 2009, 00:50
Welcome aboard from the Philippines. Enjoy all this great site has to offer

Hugh MacLean
21st January 2009, 19:15
Hello and welcome.
There was no CITY OF BRADFORD sunk during WWII. There was the 1919 vessel which had a name change in 1936 to HANNE which was lost to enemy aircraft off Malta in 1942.

Was your g/gfather a merchant seaman or a serviceman? I can only find two Harry Ibbotsons commemorated by the CWGC. One was an RCAF pilot and the other a soldier in the Royal Artillery.

Regards

Bruce Carson
21st January 2009, 20:39
A warm welcome to Ships Nostalgia, it's good to have you onboard.
I think there may be a possibility that you are looking for information on Reardon Smith's 'Bradford City', which went down in 1941.

Bruce

Hugh MacLean
21st January 2009, 21:21
I think there may be a possibility that you are looking for information on Reardon Smith's 'Bradford City', which went down in 1941.
Bruce

Hello Bruce,
I had looked at BRADFORD CITY but as far as I can tell all the crew and gunners survived. I think we need some more clarification from our enquirer especially as I can see no mention of H Ibbotson on the CWGC register.
Regards

Bruce Carson
21st January 2009, 21:25
Hugh, you're right, I don't believe there were any fatalities when she went down.
More information needed, I think.

Bruce

Billy1963
21st January 2009, 21:27
Possibly this man commemorated Tower Hill Memorial Panel 29

IBBOTSON, Chief Officer, WILLIAM, S.S. City of Bedford (Liverpool). Merchant Navy. 30th December 1940. Age 53. Son of William and Julia Ibbotson, of Ripon, Yorkshire; husband of Margaret Ibbotson, of Aigburth, Liverpool.

The City of Bedford was sunk in a collision off Iceland with the SS Bodnant in position 60' 03N 23' 01W killing 44 crew and 3 naval staff. The City of Bedford had been in the homeward bound Convoy HX-97 and the SS Bodnant had been sailing in the outward bound Convoy OB-265 and suffered no casualties.

Bruce Carson
21st January 2009, 21:30
Billy-that has to be the one.
Great detective work.

Bruce

Hugh MacLean
21st January 2009, 21:43
Nice one Billy,
I was looking for a Harry Ibbotson as mentioned by our enquirer. I had looked at the CITY OF BEDFORD as well but was thrown by the first name. I am sure you are spot on.

Regards

Hugh MacLean
21st January 2009, 21:59
Hello Billy,

You are familiar with my Ellerman's War Losses project can you confirm the casualties as 47. The Worlds Merchant Fleets list the number as 48.
Regards

eriskay
21st January 2009, 22:16
Good work, Billy. In John Slader's book (The Fourth Service) he tells how the tragic loss of 'City of Bedford', and the significant munitions she was carrying, was sufficiently serious for Churchill to write to the First Lord, First Sea Lord, Minister of Supply and Minister of Shipping, as this represented the heaviest loss of much-need munitions until then.

The tragic event occurred 280 miles South of Ireland on the morning of 30th December 1940 when the East-bound Convoy HX97 and West-bound Convoy OB264 found themselves on almost directly-opposite courses. The night had been dark, a Force 7 wind blowing, and there was thick fog. The commodore ship, Ellerman's 'City of Bedford', was struck on her side by the Elder-Dempster steamer 'Bodnant', and the heavily-laden 'City of Bedford' went down in only twenty seconds, taking with her the Commodore, Rear-Admiral Hamilton, and many of the ship's crew.

It is believed the 'Bodnant' also foundered as a result of this collision.

Billy1963
22nd January 2009, 11:40
Hello Billy,

You are familiar with my Ellerman's War Losses project can you confirm the casualties as 47. The Worlds Merchant Fleets list the number as 48.
Regards

Hugh,

48 casualties confirmed. There was a spelling mistake in my casualty data.

Bombay/Chittagong Memorial 40
Tower Hill Memorial 4
Portsmouth Memorial 1
Plymouth Memorial 1
Halifax Memorial 1
Liverpool Memorial 1

Hugh MacLean
22nd January 2009, 20:33
Many thanks again Billy.
Regards