Ruddbank

Ian
10th April 2004, 23:00
Completed in 1979 and photographed in her original colours in 1983, the RUDDBANK changed ownership in her first years in service and became the NAPIER STAR.

John Rogers
15th May 2004, 03:27
I was on the Moraybank back in Jan 1948-Jul 1948 a happy ship. Spent a couple of weeks in NZ the rest was spent sailing around the Tongas and Fiji Islands.

Ian
15th May 2004, 19:20
Hi yer Old Salt.....,
Always fancied being at sea in the late forties but never made it until '59.
I think Bank Line were Marconi ships and I was with IMRC.
Sounds like a nice 'run' Unfortunately, never made it to the Far East. Would like to have taken a look at NZ. Almost emigrated to S.A. when with Union-Castle but their crazy politics put me off, crazy racists!

Chose Canada and never looked back, except to my days at sea which were great.

Good to have you on the site.

Ian (Admin).

david smith
7th November 2004, 11:08
look at thread Global Mariner to see the end of this ship

Fairfield
7th November 2004, 12:12
Forgot she was already on the site-good shot although I felt they didn/t have the character of the earlier 70s built series.

Doug Rogers
8th November 2004, 03:13
Greetings All,
I think Ian is right, most of the Bank Line ships had Radio Officers supplied by Marconi. I think there were a couple of ships in the late 60's-early 70"s who had them supplied by Redifon but am not sure how long that arrangement went for. Bank Line did a lot of trade in the Pacific region in those days and the runs were not bad but I guess the detraction was that they were generally away for 12-15 months at a time. I guess that was pretty normal for a lot of shipping in those days but I wonder how our current seafarers might feel about that these days!!...times have certainly changed a lot.
As a aside in my early seagoing days I was sent to Hamburg by Marconi to join the "Dartbank" - she was just over a year old and had just come out of her first drydock. She was a nice ship, good crew and seemed very well found but alas I never sailed on her, had a serious accident a few days after I joined during boat drill when a winch handle came loose and fractured my skull. Ended up in hospital in Hamburg for a fair while and then a long time off sick after they finally flew me back to the UK.
I often wonder what happened to her and her class, certainly containerisation was beginning to start with a vengeance but the impact would certainly have been delayed for a fair while on a lot of the areas that they traded in.
Doug

Stephen Swinhoe
29th September 2005, 00:34
Ruddbank,ship No906,built Deptford Shipyard(Laings)Sunderland,launched 1.11.78.

Pat McCardle
29th September 2005, 08:45
Greetings All,
I think Ian is right, most of the Bank Line ships had Radio Officers supplied by Marconi. I think there were a couple of ships in the late 60's-early 70"s who had them supplied by Redifon but am not sure how long that arrangement went for. Bank Line did a lot of trade in the Pacific region in those days and the runs were not bad but I guess the detraction was that they were generally away for 12-15 months at a time. I guess that was pretty normal for a lot of shipping in those days but I wonder how our current seafarers might feel about that these days!!...times have certainly changed a lot.
As a aside in my early seagoing days I was sent to Hamburg by Marconi to join the "Dartbank" - she was just over a year old and had just come out of her first drydock. She was a nice ship, good crew and seemed very well found but alas I never sailed on her, had a serious accident a few days after I joined during boat drill when a winch handle came loose and fractured my skull. Ended up in hospital in Hamburg for a fair while and then a long time off sick after they finally flew me back to the UK.
I often wonder what happened to her and her class, certainly containerisation was beginning to start with a vengeance but the impact would certainly have been delayed for a fair while on a lot of the areas that they traded in.
Doug

12 to 15 months at a time hey? Marvelous. I work 28DAYS on 28DAYS off & you should hear the cries of woe when the ship has to stay at sea for an extra day or you get called back a day early. Longest I done was 10 months back in 1980 I wanted to do 12 months just to keep my Uncle quiet as he was a 18 monther man when he was at sea.....& there was a war on!! Seamen today.....Where are they? Possibly driving taxi's & thinking of conny- onny. Ha!!

ruud
29th September 2005, 09:19
Ahoy,

The name Ruddbank, rings a bell, wasn't she renamed as Lady Rebecca and Global Mariner?......Yep I've found something on her;

M.V.GLOBAL MARINER: was built in the U.K. by Sunderland Shipbuilders, in June 1979, for the Bank Line Ltd. Her original name was RUDBANK and changed to LADY REBECCA . Her length is 531ft. width is75ft. and gt. of 12778 -The Engine is the last of the remaining British designed, opposed piston Doxford 76j4 engines, with average speed of 15.5 knots, and operational crew of 25, with I T F crew of 33I.T.F. (International Transport Worker's Federation) brings together 500 unions in more than 125 countries, that represent nearly one million seafarers and dockers, as well as another four million other union members. She is travelling the world to allow as many people as possible, who receive goods by sea to understand some of the deplorable condition aboard ships who fly Flags Of Convenience (F.O.C.) She is a tweendecker, with watertight doors cut between the empty holds so that you can walk from one hold to another, and in each there are displays, and dramatic images of living and working conditions often found on some of these F.O.C. vessels. When she come to your port, it would be well worth your time to go aboard and have a look around. It has been brought to my attention that this great ship was in a collision with a dry cargo ship the "ATLANTIC CRUSADER" in the Orinoco River in August of 2000 flooding hatches 1 - 4 and she sank very quickly. A sad ending for a great ship.
(GLOBAL MARINER) (http://www.geocities.com/uksteve.geo/glob.html)


http://members.shaw.ca/gcsimpson/GlobalMariner.jpg

lampy
21st January 2006, 18:45
I was bosun on the Global Mariner from the time she was converted in Bremen to an exhibition ship to her handover to Clyde Marine as a cadet ship.Probably the best twenty months of my 40 year career.I have recently posted some pics of her during our tour. For the Star men there is a good shot of her as the Napier Star. During her career she was named the Lairg, Napier Star,then Lamport Holt i believe had her during the Falklands campaign
after which she became Tampacheree,Lady Rebecca and finally Global Mariner

oldmarconiman
22nd January 2006, 18:12
Interesting to read your comments. I was a 'Marconi Man' and sailed from Rotterdam in September 1958 to Hong Kong on the old liberty ship "S.S. Corabank" built as the "Samfleet" were she was sold in December of that year to the Chinese. Then it was down to Singapore to join "M.V. Eskbank" on the same articles, eventually signing off in Dar-es-Salaam in September 1960. Eskbank traded from Cape Town to Far East via "all ports". The round trip took plus/minus 5 months from CT to CT, or Japan to Japan! Great ship, great crew and great grub! Coupled with interesting ports of call a good and enjoyable two years away from base! Pity the Marconi pay wasn't so great though! Eskbank was also sold to the Chinese some months after I signed off.

Greetings All,
I think Ian is right, most of the Bank Line ships had Radio Officers supplied by Marconi. I think there were a couple of ships in the late 60's-early 70"s who had them supplied by Redifon but am not sure how long that arrangement went for. Bank Line did a lot of trade in the Pacific region in those days and the runs were not bad but I guess the detraction was that they were generally away for 12-15 months at a time. I guess that was pretty normal for a lot of shipping in those days but I wonder how our current seafarers might feel about that these days!!...times have certainly changed a lot.
As a aside in my early seagoing days I was sent to Hamburg by Marconi to join the "Dartbank" - she was just over a year old and had just come out of her first drydock. She was a nice ship, good crew and seemed very well found but alas I never sailed on her, had a serious accident a few days after I joined during boat drill when a winch handle came loose and fractured my skull. Ended up in hospital in Hamburg for a fair while and then a long time off sick after they finally flew me back to the UK.
I often wonder what happened to her and her class, certainly containerisation was beginning to start with a vengeance but the impact would certainly have been delayed for a fair while on a lot of the areas that they traded in.
Doug

John B.
24th January 2006, 06:49
Greetings
Its a long time ago ,but seem to remember loading RuddBank at Gisborne NZ with a full load of grain for Asia,Her first or second voyage she was in new condition. Subsequently on the voyage north she rescued a number of Vietnamese boat people and took them into Hongkong.
Some of you Bankboatmen may remember this, or correct me if I am mistaken.
Best rgds/John B.

PJW
24th January 2006, 21:44
I think it was Roachbank that was involved in a rescue of a lot of boat people. This was shortly after the Sibonga (Firbank) had done likewise.

lampy
11th February 2006, 22:17
i have just posted some pictures of the Global Mariner on the South American leg of her round the world trip

david harrod
20th April 2006, 16:14
I think it was Roachbank that was involved in a rescue of a lot of boat people. This was shortly after the Sibonga (Firbank) had done likewise.
I think you are right, the Sibonga did her refugee thing the trip after I left her (I was mate); the old man on the Roach (can't think of his name, but he was a fairly new Master) got a gong from the Gov't and the sack from the company...I think they picked up about 150 and were stuck in a detention anchorage in HK for about 6 months...

robparsons101
5th July 2006, 20:12
I have recently subscribed and when I have finished setting up the computer (we have just moved house) I will upload the photographs from the Bank Line magazines that I still have. Some of these contain the crew lists and photographs, also articles on the new and old ships.

Les Gibson
6th July 2006, 01:08
Doug,
I joined the Dartbank with you as Chief Electrician. We all travelled out on Harwich ferry. I remember you being clouted with the winch handle. Maybe it was a blessing, we were away 2 days short of 18 months! And the food was grim. Fred Eades took over as R/O, did you know him?

oldmarconiman
6th July 2006, 09:23
I have recently subscribed and when I have finished setting up the computer (we have just moved house) I will upload the photographs from the Bank Line magazines that I still have. Some of these contain the crew lists and photographs, also articles on the new and old ships.

Hi Rob,

I served on two Bank Line ships, the S.S. Corabank (Liberty Ship on her last voyage under Bank Line flag) and M.V. Eskbank back in 58/59 and look forward to seeing your postings of photgraphs in the future.

ATB

polaris37
16th January 2007, 12:12
http://www.pbase.com/image/48811341.jpg

Ruddbank 1983, Penang

rogerburn
3rd December 2007, 21:24
I have recently subscribed and when I have finished setting up the computer (we have just moved house) I will upload the photographs from the Bank Line magazines that I still have. Some of these contain the crew lists and photographs, also articles on the new and old ships.
Hello everybody.Looking for the photogrqphs of Bqnk Line Ships

Roger

EngineerSister
14th May 2008, 11:12
http://www.pbase.com/image/48811341.jpg

Ruddbank 1983, Penang

I was having a conversation with my brother about the Vietnamese boat people this morning and I found this site after looking fore the Ruddbank on google. He was on the Ruddbank and the Cedarbank when they picked up boat people.

He was an engineer - Eric. You may know him.

Hugh Nhan
27th June 2008, 17:53
I'm one of the 123 boat people picked up by the Ruddbank on Aug 5, 1979 somewhere in the South China sea. I was 19 years young at the time. We were drifting w/o fuel, water and food for 7-8 days, and had not seen any passerby vessel for the last several days. Death had started on board. With the last drops of diesel, and in the last desperate act, our small wooden boat attempted to ram the Ruddbank starboard while it was coming to us at full steam from the horizon. It was about 6-7AM. The huge wakes from the Ruddbank pushed our boat away before impact, but the Ruddbank stopped when they thought they had run over a fishing boat. We were saved.

W/O English at the beginning, and being tossed in the whirlpool of the following life events, I have never had the chance to contact the Ruddbank crew to say thanks. The last couple years, I have been trying to research more about the Ruddbank and found this forum. I'm very glad to know that your brother was a crewmate. Could you pass along my story to him.

-hugh

Terry Burke
7th July 2008, 20:45
Completed in 1979 and photographed in her original colours in 1983, the RUDDBANK changed ownership in her first years in service and became the NAPIER STAR.

When Ruddbank joined BSSM she was renamed they ROMNEY for Booth Line she was also the first vessel to transfer to Blue Star's Hong Kong outfit Lion Shipping and renamed LAIRG then later she was renamed again to NAPIER STAR

Quiney
3rd October 2008, 14:18
I'm one of the 123 boat people picked up by the Ruddbank on Aug 5, 1979 somewhere in the South China sea. I was 19 years young at the time. We were drifting w/o fuel, water and food for 7-8 days, and had not seen any passerby vessel for the last several days. Death had started on board. With the last drops of diesel, and in the last desperate act, our small wooden boat attempted to ram the Ruddbank starboard while it was coming to us at full steam from the horizon. It was about 6-7AM. The huge wakes from the Ruddbank pushed our boat away before impact, but the Ruddbank stopped when they thought they had run over a fishing boat. We were saved.

W/O English at the beginning, and being tossed in the whirlpool of the following life events, I have never had the chance to contact the Ruddbank crew to say thanks. The last couple years, I have been trying to research more about the Ruddbank and found this forum. I'm very glad to know that your brother was a crewmate. Could you pass along my story to him.

-hugh

Hi Hugh
I was the Radio Officer on the Rudbank when we picked you up all those years ago. The ship was new at the time and we were carrying cargo from the UK/Continent to China.
As a previous company ship (Sebonga) had picked up refugees we were instructed not to sail up the Vietnam coast, but to take a more easterly route. Our captains intention was to pass water to any refugee boats that we encountered, but not rescue them.
When the captain saw the condition of yourselves and the boat, he decided to bring you all on board.
We had to called in to Hong Kong where two of your people were air-lifted off for medical reasons, and were supplied with extra food for you all, but not allowed to dock in Hong Kong.
The captain personally nursed a young girl in his cabin, but she sadly died and was buried at sea.
In China, the authorities would not guarantee your safe passage to England and so the captain refused to hand you over to the authorities. The ship was heavily guarded by Red Guard soldiers.
To add to our problems, the ship was rammed in the bow whilst moored in Shanghai and was holed in the bow (remember - this was the ships maiden voyage) and we had to go further up river to have the hole repaired. We then continued to Tsingtao in China and then on to Japan.
In Japan the Red Cross came onboard and you were all taken ashore and presuamably sent on the England.

I have two photographs of you and your small fishing boat as it attempted to ram us, I was low on film and these are the only photos I managed to take. Also, I have not thrown it away, I have a full listing of you all (name, age, sex, occupation and whether you had a passport) that was made at the time and I had to telex to the British authorities

non descript
3rd October 2008, 15:19
I'm one of the 123 boat people picked up by the Ruddbank on Aug 5, 1979 somewhere in the South China sea. I


Hugh,
What a very nice and extremely moving first post. - A very warm welcome to you and I hope you enjoy SN and we look forward to your time with us. (Thumb)
Mark

EngineerSister
16th October 2008, 01:43
I'm one of the 123 boat people picked up by the Ruddbank on Aug 5, 1979 somewhere in the South China sea. I was 19 years young at the time. We were drifting w/o fuel, water and food for 7-8 days, and had not seen any passerby vessel for the last several days. Death had started on board. With the last drops of diesel, and in the last desperate act, our small wooden boat attempted to ram the Ruddbank starboard while it was coming to us at full steam from the horizon. It was about 6-7AM. The huge wakes from the Ruddbank pushed our boat away before impact, but the Ruddbank stopped when they thought they had run over a fishing boat. We were saved.

W/O English at the beginning, and being tossed in the whirlpool of the following life events, I have never had the chance to contact the Ruddbank crew to say thanks. The last couple years, I have been trying to research more about the Ruddbank and found this forum. I'm very glad to know that your brother was a crewmate. Could you pass along my story to him.

-hugh

Hello Hugh, I passed this message on to my brother. He hasn't been on this website yet but may get round to it one of these days! He was very interested to hear your story - it's always good to know that there have been some happy endings.

My brother - Eric McLean - was 3rd Engineer on board Ruddbank and he was on watch at the time that you attempted to ram the ship. (He is a fairly tall Scotsman, with long blond hair and glasses - if I had a photo' of him, I'd send it but I don't and I can't see any photos of him on this site. He reckons it must have been before 4am when the incident took place because he was still on the 12 - 4am watch as 3rd engineer) He remembers that the 2nd mate - Dick Penhaligan - was also on watch on the bridge at the time and that he altered course to turn away from your boat to avoid a collision. When the boat kept on coming he realised that there was more to this than a just possible collision with a fishing boat. He also remembers that 11 people had died before you were rescued and that more died on board, including the little girl who was being looked after in the Captain's cabin.

Eric remembers that the owner's suite was given up to young women, mothers and babies and the Apprentices' cabins were given up to young boys. Apparently there was not much rest to be had for the engineers because the laundry room was in constant use in "Engineers' Alley" and the little kids used to run around in the corridor and keep them all awake!

They were all glad to be have been able to rescue those on board though. I assume you went from Japan to the USA - I can't see you being taken to the UK from Japan but maybe you were?

trotterdotpom
16th October 2008, 13:15
Wow! Fantastic that you folk have made contact through SN.

John T.

Phil hird
18th December 2011, 00:40
I'm one of the 123 boat people picked up by the Ruddbank on Aug 5, 1979 somewhere in the South China sea. I was 19 years young at the time. We were drifting w/o fuel, water and food for 7-8 days, and had not seen any passerby vessel for the last several days. Death had started on board. With the last drops of diesel, and in the last desperate act, our small wooden boat attempted to ram the Ruddbank starboard while it was coming to us at full steam from the horizon. It was about 6-7AM. The huge wakes from the Ruddbank pushed our boat away before impact, but the Ruddbank stopped when they thought they had run over a fishing boat. We were saved.

W/O English at the beginning, and being tossed in the whirlpool of the following life events, I have never had the chance to contact the Ruddbank crew to say thanks. The last couple years, I have been trying to research more about the Ruddbank and found this forum. I'm very glad to know that your brother was a crewmate. Could you pass along my story to him.

-hugh
I was a deck cadet on the Ruddbank at the time of the rescue. I was on duty on the bridge and in company with Richard Penhalogen the third mate at the time the refugee boat was sighted. I have in my possession a copy of the ships log and the original message sent to the ships owners with regard to the rescue of the Vietnamese refugees. More significantly my youngest daughter was born on the 28th of July 17 years and 2 hours after the rescue.

Alan Rawlinson
18th December 2011, 09:27
I was a deck cadet on the Ruddbank at the time of the rescue. I was on duty on the bridge and in company with Richard Penhalogen the third mate at the time the refugee boat was sighted. I have in my possession a copy of the ships log and the original message sent to the ships owners with regard to the rescue of the Vietnamese refugees. More significantly my youngest daughter was born on the 28th of July 17 years and 2 hours after the rescue.

Hallo Phil

Was the Master at the time John Appleby?

Quiney
18th December 2011, 19:22
Hallo Phil

Was the Master at the time John Appleby?

No. The master was C B Davies from the Wirral.

Johnnietwocoats
19th December 2011, 04:35
What a wonderful story....JTC

Waighty
27th December 2011, 20:49
Sailed as Mate on the Ruddbank 1981, Ellis Rees was Master - USA to South Africa service. Southbound cargo reasonable, northbound very disappointing. Great class of ship though, apart from burst freshwater pipes flooding the crews accommodation on our first southerly leg! Next ship Troutbank on NYK charter to Arabian Gulf, two 'fishbanks' in a row and no deep tanks - yahoo!

vn1979
29th June 2013, 09:10
Hello Phil Hird, Quiney, Hugh Nhan, and everyone on the Ruddbank ship in 1979!

My name is Vien Nguyen. Like Hugh Nhan, I was also one of 123 Vietnamese boat people in the event of 1979. I would like to thank you all of the Ruddbank's crews for rescuing/helping us. There is one inaccurate information in your posts: the master nursed a little girl in his room and that girl died shortly. That was the 2 years old boy (named Bui The Linh) died on the Ruddbank and surprisingly Master C.B. Davies remembers the boy's name by heart since that day.
Yes, the Master was C.B. Davies in Wirral. I just came to Wirral to visit him and his family few days ago on June 20th 2013 for the first time, accompanied by my husband and our daughter. We brought a letter and 2 pictures from Bui The Linh's parents to Mr. Davies. The emotion runs pretty high for all of us. He told us that he was interviewed months ago by a writer/journalist from Liverpool who is writing a book about the boat people who was rescued by the English ships and the Ruddbank is one chapter in that book. I'm looking forward to read that book.
God bless you all and please accept the sincere thank you from my heart.

Vien

Andy
29th June 2013, 10:09
Hello Phil Hird, Quiney, Hugh Nhan, and everyone on the Ruddbank ship in 1979!

My name is Vien Nguyen. Like Hugh Nhan, I was also one of 123 Vietnamese boat people in the event of 1979. I would like to thank you all of the Ruddbank's crews for rescuing/helping us. There is one inaccurate information in your posts: the master nursed a little girl in his room and that girl died shortly. That was the 2 years old boy (named Bui The Linh) died on the Ruddbank and surprisingly Master C.B. Davies remembers the boy's name by heart since that day.
Yes, the Master was C.B. Davies in Wirral. I just came to Wirral to visit him and his family few days ago on June 20th 2013 for the first time, accompanied by my husband and our daughter. We brought a letter and 2 pictures from Bui The Linh's parents to Mr. Davies. The emotion runs pretty high for all of us. He told us that he was interviewed months ago by a writer/journalist from Liverpool who is writing a book about the boat people who was rescued by the English ships and the Ruddbank is one chapter in that book. I'm looking forward to read that book.
God bless you all and please accept the sincere thank you from my heart.

Vien
Hi Vien, many thanks for your input and information on this.
Best regards,
Andy

rabaul
16th July 2013, 16:51
I am really pleased to hear that CB is keeping well. I sailed with him on the Tenchbank 1982 , a fine gentleman.