First BP super tanker

Roy Fox
9th March 2009, 12:32
Anyone know the date into service, the size (dwt) and name of the first super tanker with British Tanker Co? Around 1952 I would guess.

K urgess
9th March 2009, 12:48
Depends what you class as a supertanker.
The official VLCC size is 160,000 tons to 319,999 tons.
The first tanker to break the 100,000 ton size was one of Ludwig's (Universe Apollo) in 1958 so you're looking for a later date than 1952.
Cheers
Kris

trotterdotpom
9th March 2009, 13:01
I seem to remember British Admiral (about 60,000grt) being referred to as a Supetanker in the mid-60s. I thought she was built on the Tyne but I see from the gallery that she was built at Barrow. Don't know how long her reign as a supertanker lasted, not long I'd say.

John T.

vectiscol
9th March 2009, 13:27
Was British Admiral the first 100,000 dwt tanker from a UK yard? Can anybody confirm?

John_F
9th March 2009, 21:56
Anyone know the date into service, the size (dwt) and name of the first super tanker with British Tanker Co? Around 1952 I would guess.
Roy,
BP's first super tanker was the British Adventure which was double the size of anything existing in the fleet at that time. This was 1950 when she was launched on December 12th & completed on September 7th 1951. Her dwt was 30,218. When launched by Vickers Armstrong, Barrow, she was the largest tanker in the world although this was was soon superceded as tanker sizes increased rapidly.
The Adventure & her immediate successors over the next 10 years or so were known as super tankers, by BP personnel anyway. By the early 60s, +100,000 dwt was becoming common & these became known as VLCCs (Very large crude carriers). Please don't ask me what the cut off tonnage was between super tanker & VLCC!
The British Admiral was the first BP tanker of 100,000 dwt, completed in August 1965 by Vickers of Barrow. She had a short life, being sold for scrap in August 1976.
Kind regards,
John.

Frank P
9th March 2009, 23:24
Anyone know the date into service, the size (dwt) and name of the first super tanker with British Tanker Co? Around 1952 I would guess.

The question was "What was the name of the first super tanker with the British Tanker Co. ( BP)?
One of the answers talks about Ludwigs, had he got an financial interest in The British Tanker Co.(BP) in the 1950's?
Cheers Frank(Thumb)

John_F
9th March 2009, 23:34
The question was "What was the name of the first super tanker with the British Tanker Co. ( BP)?
One of the answers talks about Ludwigs, had he got an financial interest in The British Tanker Co.(BP) in the 1950's?
Cheers Frank(Thumb)
Frank,
As far as I am aware, BP never had anything to do with Ludwig's, although I stand to be corrected. I certainly never saw any of Ludwig's tankers appearing at any of BP's terminals in the UK.
As far as I am concerned, but quite willing to be proved wrong - & with good grace! - the British Adventure was the first BP super tanker.
Kind regards,
John.

K urgess
9th March 2009, 23:41
The mention of the Ludwig tanker was purely to illustrate the expected date.
I sailed on a 72,000 ton tanker and it was never called a supertanker.
The only supertankers I ever experienced were VLCCs and as far as I've known up until now is that the common useage of the term applies to VLCCs and above.
For the figures I looked at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_tanker
Cheers
Kris

alastairjs
9th March 2009, 23:45
Vectiscol,
Further to John's reply above, when the British Admiral (3) was delivered to the company on the 4th August 1965 she was the largest merchant ship, in terms of deadweight tonnage, to have been delivered from any European ship yard at 111,274 DWT. She also boasted the most advanced cargo control system then afloat. Designed in Japan for one man operation, all valves were push button operated and worked in combination with a computerised cargo management system controlled by a punch card programme produced by the chief officer for each loading, discharging, cargo transfer and ballasting operation.
Regards,
Alastair

K urgess
9th March 2009, 23:48
There appears to be a sort of definition of a supertanker here -
http://www.eoearth.org/article/Supertanker
So going by that criteria it would appear that the first BP supertanker would be the first one unable to pass through any canal fully loaded.
Cheers
Kris

John_F
10th March 2009, 01:05
There appears to be a sort of definition of a supertanker here -
http://www.eoearth.org/article/Supertanker
So going by that criteria it would appear that the first BP supertanker would be the first one unable to pass through any canal fully loaded.
Cheers
Kris
Kris,
"Super" is probably a relative term. Certainly during my time with BP (1959 - 1964) any vessel over 16,000 dwt within BP's fleet was deemed a "Super Tanker", bearing in mind that BP had nothing in between 16,000dwt & 30,000 dwt. Looking back now, 30,000dwt is miniscule but in 1951 there were not many larger vessels afloat & as far as BP were concerned, at that time, they were "Super Tankers." I was certainly informed that when I joined my first vessel - British Glory (32,000 dwt) - that she was a Super Tanker. Maybe that this is just Company hyperbole but she certainly appeared Super to me as a first tripper.
Kind regards,
John.

Roy Fox
10th March 2009, 07:09
Thanks, guys, for your replies. My question obviously had a number of supplementaries such as:
How widespread was the use of the term “supertanker”?
When did it come into being?
What was the accepted definition of a supertanker?

I was leaning towards agreeing with the suggestion of a number who felt the term was in-house to BP until I decided to do a little ‘googling’. Wikipedia (not the most authoritative source, I accept) appears to use the term for all tankers above 16,000 dwt (that was about the size of a T2 I seem to recall). The summary definition given in the on-line version of Encyclopedia Britannica is “……..an oil-carrying vessel that might exceed 500,000 dwt” No mention of minimum size. However, I’m not a suscriber so I couldn’t open the fuller definition.

There is no doubt in my mind that BP was using the term supertanker during my last year with them – 1952. So the answer that best fits my requirements is that of John who quotes the British Adventure of 30,218 dwt. My last ship was the British Engineer of 10,898 dwt. That may seem miniscule today but the flying bridge seemed pretty long if you had to battle your way aft when ploughing through the Australian Bight in winter.

Incidentally, there seems to be general agreement – including the American Bureau of Shipping (referenced below) – that the term VLCC was not introduced until the 1970’s. Prior to that the terms used were:
10,000 -24,999 dwt: General Purpose tanker
25,000 - 44,999 dwt: Medium Range tanker
45,000 - 79,999 dwt Large Range 1
80,000 – 159,999 dwt Large Range 2

This classification was developed by Shell Oil in 1954 and was called the ‘Average Freight Rate Assessment (AFRA)’ system. It was adopted by all the major tanker companies.

In the 1970’s (can’t find reference to a specific date) the list was extended to:
160,000 - 319,999 dwt: Very Large Crude Carrier (VLCC)
320,000 – 549,999 dwt: Ultra Large Crude Carrier (ULCC)

So what did those who sailed them call tankers up to 160,000 dwt in the late 50's and the 60's - not the above names I'll be bound.

I hope some of that is of interest.

Roy

K urgess
10th March 2009, 11:33
I suppose the goalposts moved as the maximum tanker size grew larger.
As I said earlier I was on a 72,000 tonner in the late 60s but by then it was just a tanker. Again in the early 70s an 85,000 tonner was the same. Supertankers were 250,000 tons. When they became commonplace the ULCCs became supertankers.
It looks like something twice as big as the average was a supertanker.
An interesting debate and as usual very informative.
Personally I always had a preferred link to the smaller ones. [=P]
Cheers
Kris

John_F
10th March 2009, 12:10
One of the answers talks about Ludwigs, had he got an financial interest in The British Tanker Co.(BP) in the 1950's?
Cheers Frank(Thumb)
Frank,
Further to your question, in the 50s the Government had at least a 55% stake in BP so it is doubtful if Ludwig had any financial interest in the Company.

Kris,
Yes - an interesting discussion. As you say, the goalposts rapidly moved over the years & what was considered large in the early 50s, by the late 60s & 70s, that size was considered quite small. When I left BP in 1964 the terms VLCC & ULCC had not been invented. Anything over 16,000dwt was a Super Tanker. As Roy says, 16,000dwt was the approximate size of the US T2s, built during the war. BP also were building 16,000 tonners of their own as this seemed to be an optimum size. To suddenly double that size must have seen to be a giant leap in tanker size, probably, in BP's case anyway, giving rise to the name Super Tanker.
Kind regards,
John.

chadburn
10th March 2009, 13:31
For me the term Super was a "title" used on a Vessel that had been built that was "larger" than anything that had been built beforehand either by the Yard or on the Register, if another Vessel was then built which was "larger" it would take over the "title" of Super. The major change came in when the term "Very Large" began to be used.

Ron Stringer
10th March 2009, 17:13
When I left BP in 1964 the terms VLCC & ULCC had not been invented. Anything over 16,000dwt was a Super Tanker.

John,

In the 1950s the Shell 'H-boats' of 18,000 dwt were considered old school since Shell were already trading with the 32,000 dwt 'V' class. In 1964 I joined a 63,000 tonner and it was only referred to as a tanker - no mention of supertanker. I think that by 1964 things had moved on and to be called a supertanker the dwt had to be in six figures at least.

richardc
10th March 2009, 21:11
Hi Chaps,
It would appear that BP referred to the British Adventure as their first supertanker. I hope I have attached a scan of part of an article about the BP Tanker Fleet from BP Magazine no.15 1965 : Tankers.
Regards, Richard.

Frank P
10th March 2009, 23:28
[QUOTE=John_F;299992]
Frank,
Further to your question, in the 50s the Government had at least a 55% stake in BP so it is doubtful if Ludwig had any financial interest in the Company.

John F, thanks for your replies,
In the 1960's/70's I sailed on three oil/chemical tankers the largest was the M/T Hallanger at 34,000 dwt the other two were around 20,000 dwt and I enjoyed my time on all three.

I think that Richard c's post says which tanker in BP's mind was their first supertanker.
Cheers Frank(Thumb)

Roy Fox
10th March 2009, 23:49
Richard

That seems to wrap it up for me as far as my original question is concerned.
On the broader question I agree that its all a question of superlatives. I don't know how it is back in England these days but out here, where sport is king, footballers are now heroes. The media really has to scratch around when the subject of winners of the Victoria Cross comes up!
But an interesting discussion. I've certainly learned something.
Roy

Nigel Wing
12th March 2009, 18:11
I started work in October 1958 at Silley (Cox) & Co Ltd Falmouth, as Office Boy/Runner for the Works Office, prior to starting my apprenticeship in the Electrical Department.
The first reference to a supertanker that I heard was when the ship/manager of the vessel British Sailor referred to her as such (Built 1953 20,950 GRT) as she drydocked, outside the office window, great viewing point at the head of No.3 Dock.
Therefore I think that John F has it about right.
Cheers.
Nigel.

vectiscol
15th March 2009, 07:21
That has been a really interesting discussion, gentlemen. Thank you for the information on British Admiral. I worked at Vickers later, and British Admiral and Oriana were their prides and joys.

Superlecky
16th March 2009, 21:45
Therefore I think that John F has it about right.
Cheers.
Nigel.

Nigel and John F are right. When the Britsh Adventure was commissioned she was referred to as a supertanker as she was so much bigger than the 16,000 tonners. The reason for the jump in size was that up until the immediate post war period the refineries were all located close to the production areas and their output was distributed in tankers, capable of carrying several grades of oil, of 12 to 16,000 dwt.

In the late 1940's the western nations decided that due to the instability in the Middle East after the founding of Israel they would establish new refineries in their own countries and ship the crude oil to them in larger tankers. Hence the sudden jump in size to around 30,000 dwt.

Incidentally the first six BP 28,000 dwt tankers had names beginning A, B, C & R, S, T. Britsh Adventure, British Bulldog, British Crown (which caught fire and sank at Umm Said in 1966), Britsh Realm, British Skill and British Talent.

The other thing to be aware of is that the rules governing the load lines of tankers changed in the early 1970's which allowed them to load deeper and a further change took place with the move to metric tonnes instead of imperial tons in the late 1970's. The original deadweight capacity of the first BP supertankers was just over 28,000 tons and not the later larger tonnages given in quite a few reference books.

John_F
17th March 2009, 09:49
Superlecky & Nigel,
Thanks for the confirmation. I've attached a short extract from a book called "Looking Back at Classic Tankers." This also seems to confirm - independently - that these first vessels from BP in the 30,000dwt class were known as Super-tankers.
Kind regards,
John.

dnobmal
17th March 2009, 17:00
I served on board 2 of the 28,000 in the early fifties and they were certainly known as Super-Tankers and addressed as such by those that sailed in them,the vessels I sailed on were the Crown and Realm quite a step up from the 12,000 and 16,000 or T2 class.They were single-berth cabins for all the crew the only exception as far as I remember were the boy ratings, as usual for BTC in those days feeding standards left a lot to be desired.There were exceptions in the fleet with regard to the messing but not too many

Hamish Mackintosh
17th March 2009, 18:03
Was not the "Bulldog" and that class, the largest tankers able to transit the Suez canal?

Michael Parkes
24th March 2009, 08:41
I have heard that at one time BP tankers of 28,000 dwt were the first supertankers, but what I do remember was the British Sailor of 32,000 dwt was the largest tanker and first of its class was at the Spithead Review in 1953.

I myself served on the British Solder of the same class in 1960 but I had already had a trip on the British Justice also of 32,000 dwt which was with streamline funnel and goalpost masts. At this time we always considered then that they were the supertankers of the day.

The first 100,000 dwt I seem to remember, I saw come down the slipway in Japan in 1959 ish. The Universal Apollo, for the Universal Tankship Company.

Please correct me if I am wrong.

Regards

Michael

Bill Davies
24th March 2009, 21:39
The contents of this thread contain much reference to my old employer Daniel K. Ludwig who was always at the forefront of building the largest tankers culminating in his building of the the 'Bantry Class' in 1968 which were in fact the worlds first ULCCs. The 'Supertanker' title when used was very transient as virtually every month a new ship was being credited as the worlds largest and a 'Supertanker' to boot.
The reference to him being a shareholder in BP is unlikely as Dan was not known to partner anyone. In fact I think the only time he took a partner was when he was trying to 'offload' the Princess Hotel chain when he partnered 'Tiny Rowlands' (Lonro). His presence may have been for the usual 'due diligence' process. Who can say.

R651400
25th March 2009, 11:42
The first real super-tankers as they were known in the '50's were down to the "Golden Greeks" Livanos, Onassis and Niarchos.
BP and Shell still churning out staid looking pre war ships lacking any tonnage increase or innovative style.
Taking tankers from 1948 onwards the first real super-tanker was Niarchos's US built "World Liberty."
The UK accepting that such behemoths existed when they eventually built "World Unity" and "World Enterprise" in the early '50s.
Universe Tankships were late starters and extremely down-market with their low quality unaesthetically looking ships and suspect from the outset with the loss of an almost entire class-build.

http://www.t2tanker.org/ships/bulktrader.html

John_F
25th March 2009, 17:10
The first real super-tankers as they were known in the '50's were down to the "Golden Greeks" Livanos, Onassis and Niarchos.
BP and Shell still churning out staid looking pre war ships lacking any tonnage increase or innovative style.
Taking tankers from 1948 onwards the first real super-tanker was Niarchos's US built "World Liberty."
The UK accepting that such behemoths existed when they eventually built "World Unity" and "World Enterprise" in the early '50s.
Universe Tankships were late starters and extremely down-market with their low quality unaesthetically looking ships and suspect from the outset with the loss of an almost entire class-build.

http://www.t2tanker.org/ships/bulktrader.html
R651400,
The World Liberty was completed in 1949 (according to Tanker Directory of the World). The British Adventure, marginally larger than the World Liberty, was launched in December 1950. Whilst I would agree with your comment "staid looking, pre war ships", I would have to take you to task on "lacking any tonnage increase." The British Adventure was almost twice the size of any other vessel in the BP fleet when launched.
It was not until 1956 that BP did away with full size masts, the Industry being the first vessel with goalposts when launched that year. Streamlined funnels followed in 1957 & from 1958 to the mid 60s they built some of the most attractive tankers of that era (in my opinion, anyway). The Italian designed & built 35,000 dwt Light class were superb lookers, especially when down to their marks (wouldn't have wanted to be an engineer on them though!). Have to agree with your comments on Universe Tankships.
The question was, though, which was the first super tanker with BP & this has to be the Adventure.
Kind regards,
John.

R651400
25th March 2009, 19:57
John, I mentioned "World Liberty" as the first super tanker in terms of tonnage.
In terms of stream-lined tankers of the future the first was, unless anyone can prove otherwise... Niarchos "World Peace/ELAF" Liberian IMO 101.

John_F
25th March 2009, 23:01
John, I mentioned "World Liberty" as the first super tanker in terms of tonnage.
In terms of stream-lined tankers of the future the first was, unless anyone can prove otherwise... Niarchos "World Peace/ELAF" Liberian IMO 101.
R651400,
I have no photos of the World Peace so cannot disagree. However, she was built in 1949 & was no larger than T2s of that era so hardly a supertanker.
Have to agree with you that the Greeks (Livanos, Onassis & Niarchos) built some lovely stylish vessels. In general, they always looked very well maintained although I do remember once at Mena seeing the World Glory in a very rusty state:
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=2351
She had an unfortunate end, breaking in 2 off Durban in 1968, catching fire & sinking with the loss of 25 crew.
Thanks for an interesting discussion - would appreciate any other comments you have to make on the subject, as for me, this era is very interesting.
Kind regards,
John.

R651400
26th March 2009, 01:48
John, W.Liberty came just after W.Peace and unfortunately photographs of both are rare. Take a look in my gallery and you'll see a commemerative Liberian stamp of W.Peace.
Onassis always seemed to have the edge on the others with his pristine white hulls culminating in the lovely "Tina Onassis."
Indeed it was an interesting time especially to be sailing with them. Regards.

Old Janner
26th March 2009, 07:43
John, W.Liberty came just after W.Peace and unfortunately photographs of both are rare. Take a look in my gallery and you'll see a commemerative Liberian stamp of W.Peace.
Onassis always seemed to have the edge on the others with his pristine white hulls culminating in the lovely "Tina Onassis."
Indeed it was an interesting time especially to be sailing with them. Regards.

1961 I was told to join the British Industry in Falmouth dry dock, the man at the British Shipping Federation told me it was a 'supertanker' so it must be true.
Other idea is a follow on from Richards thread and article from the BP magazine.
"Supertankers were fast steam turbine ships" the older and later newer small ships were all Motor ships.

Spence.

Old Janner
26th March 2009, 07:52
John, W.Liberty came just after W.Peace and unfortunately photographs of both are rare. Take a look in my gallery and you'll see a commemerative Liberian stamp of W.Peace.
Onassis always seemed to have the edge on the others with his pristine white hulls culminating in the lovely "Tina Onassis."
Indeed it was an interesting time especially to be sailing with them. Regards.

Frank,
As far as I am aware, BP never had anything to do with Ludwig's, although I stand to be corrected. I certainly never saw any of Ludwig's tankers appearing at any of BP's terminals in the UK.
As far as I am concerned, but quite willing to be proved wrong - & with good grace! - the British Adventure was the first BP super tanker.
Kind regards,
John.

Right John, I remeber loading at Banais on the British Power various trips and often saw a Luwigs tankers loading, always for the US. Typical black stovepipe funnel, a thin pipe foremast and no elabarate superstructure. I was told that the owner visited one of his new buildings and saw a swept back fore mast and streamline funnel, supposedly he asked if you could carry oil in these structures, answer was NO, his reply was get them off!

Regards,

Spence.

R651400
26th March 2009, 11:43
I was told that the owner visited one of his new buildings and saw a swept back fore mast and streamline funnel, supposedly he asked if you could carry oil in these structures, answer was NO, his reply was get them off!.Spence, I'll leave SN member and Universe Tankship's St Peter to answer that one! Regards.

ernhelenbarrett
26th March 2009, 11:55
I left British Gratitude in 1954 and Marconi was going to send me on a Shell
Supertanker (their words!!) called the Velutina and she was so big I was to have a junior R/O with me (Trainee?!!) and the ship was 28000 tons. Having just spent a year on the Gratitude I declined and was sent down to Middlesborough to join the B.I. ship Palamcotta for a 3 month trip to Bombay and back , need I say more ! It was many years later isaw UK again
Ern Barrett

HALLLINE
26th March 2009, 12:37
John, just as a matter of interest, which BP tanker is the funnel of that you use as your logo, (if that makes sense).
Dave

John_F
26th March 2009, 17:14
I was told that the owner visited one of his new buildings and saw a swept back fore mast and streamline funnel, supposedly he asked if you could carry oil in these structures, answer was NO, his reply was get them off!

Regards,

Spence.

Spence,
Yes - I had heard that story as well. Although the accommodation & other acoutrements on board were very austere, I believe that Ludwig paid well, or so I heard.
Kind regards,
John.

John_F
26th March 2009, 17:17
John, just as a matter of interest, which BP tanker is the funnel of that you use as your logo, (if that makes sense).
Dave

Dave,
My "Avatar" is a photo of the funnel of the Resource, the second one, built in 1949 & scrapped in 1972.
Kind regards,
John.

Superlecky
26th March 2009, 22:45
It is on record that Ludwig told his ship designers that a ton of unneccessary steel was a ton off the deadweight and that if he found any such steelwork they were out of a job.

I also heard that his four 'Bulk' tankers built in the late 1940's were powered by steam turbine sets which were built for two USN cruisers cancelled at the end of WWII. As these were twin screw ships two of the four ships propellors turned in the opposite direction to normal and they had quite a number of accidents because of this.

Chris P

R651400
27th March 2009, 12:02
I also heard that his four 'Bulk' tankers built in the late 1940's were powered by steam turbine sets which were built for two USN cruisers cancelled at the end of WWII. As these were twin screw ships two of the four ships propellors turned in the opposite direction to normal and they had quite a number of accidents because of this. Is it possible the losses of the Bulkpetrol class and impunity from the US Governement may possibly have led to cuts in building practices that led to future VLCC and ULCC disasters?

msalter
27th March 2009, 12:41
Hi All

With reference to the British Adventure of 1951, I have just received a DVD entitled 'Tankers' an episode no 14 produced by Snowbow publications. It is part of the series named 'The Great Liners.'
This vessel features prominently during the 59 min episode. Perhaps it was originally a recruiting film for Cadets? However the complete series are each masterpices in themselves. If you have not viewed their website which includes various trailers for individual episodes I heartily recommend them. I am reliving my life in the then proud British Merchant Navy when we had over 55% of the worlds fleet c '50/60's
www.snowbow.co.uk
Best wishes to all Malcolm S.

davierh
27th March 2009, 13:16
Hi All
Below is a list of the largest tankers built by year.Please note that many of these earlier tankers were later "Jumbolised" by lengthening etc. so their deadweigt increased from that shown.
This list is still being compiled,modified, I am sure that members will be interested and for some certain ships will bring back memories.
I have listed the ships by LARGEST DWT by year and others built the same year.Note that they are not in DATE order within the year.
LR/IMO Shipname Built launched Gross Deadweight Lgth O/A Beam Build Yard No DWT Flag Status
Original Original yyyy/mm Mirimar Lloyds
1140703 CADILLAC 1917-12 18/09/1917 11106 17035dwt 161.60 20.20 Palmers 848 United Kingdom Lost ww2

2221608 JOHN D ARCHBOLD 1921-09 20/08/1921 14054 22600dwt 173.80 22.90 Newport News 261 United States Of America Broken Up
2221675 WmROCKEFELLER 1921-11 05/10/1921 14055 22390dwt 169.10 23.00 Newport News 262 United States Of America Lost ww2
CHARLES G BLACK 1921-00 21135dwt
1141674 G HARRISON SMITH 1921-09 12/07/1921 15371 20615dwt 167.80 22.00 Bethlehem 4210 Canada Lost ww2
2221884 W.H.RHEEM 1922-01 28/10/1921 9838 16036dwt 152.40 20.80 Bethlehem USA 5313 United States Of America Broken Up
2221784 H.M.STOREY 1921-12 28/09/1921 9838 16036dwt 152.40 20.80 Bethlehem USA 5312 United States Of America Lost ww2
2221695 F.H.HILMAN 1921-10 28/07/1921 9835 16036dwt 152.40 20.80 Bethlehem USA 5311 United States Of America Broken Up

1146560 SAN FABIAN 1922-05 18/10/1921 13031 19800dwt 161.70 21.20 Armstrong Whitworth 913 United Kingdom Lost ww2

1160498 C.O.STILLMAN 1928-02 16436 24000dwt 172.40 23.00 Bremen 646 United Kingdom Lost ww2

1161107 ATHELCROWN 1929-08 25/04/1929 11999 18245dwt 160.40 21.00 Furness 137 United Kingdom Lost ww2

2230308 W.F.FARISH 1930-11 11/10/1930 11787 20615dwt 160.00 22.60 Federal 114 United States Of America Broken Up

5614694 EMILE MIGUET 1937-05 12/04/1937 14155 21735dwt 166.40 22.50 France 158 French Lost ww2

5613993 PALMYRE 1940-00 26/12/1939 14120 21735dwt 175.90 22.50 St Nazarie Q9 Deutch Lost ww2/rebuilt

2240389 VIRGINIA 1941-03 10731 18900dwt 152.40 21.30 Welding 8 United Kingdom Lost ww2

5239711 MONMOUTH 1942-10 21/10/1942 10434 16613dwt L 159.60 20.70 Sun 248 30258 United States Of America Broken Up
2242509 VIRGINIA 1942-00 10944 18900dwt 152.40 21.30 Welding 11 United States Of America Broken Up

5428910 SASSTOWN 1943-02 31/01/1943 10198 16613dwt L 153.30 20.70 Sun 277 30331 Liberia Broken Up
5413989 RED CANYON 1943-12 18/08/1943 10172 16613dwt L 159.60 20.70 Alkabama 259 30303 United States Of America Broken Up

5234436 BENITA 1944-08 15/08/1944 10297 16613dwt L 159.60 20.70 Sun 445 30258 United States Of America Broken Up
2246756 PHOENIX 1944-11 14179 23900dwt 169.50 24.40 Welding 18 United States Of America Broken Up
5417519 ELIZABETH 1944-10 34760 Panama Broken Up
5361356 COLORADO 1944-00 L 31081 United States Of America Broken Up

5388421 POINT MARGO 1945-01 17/01/1945 10297 16613dwt L 159.60 20.70 Sun 404 30258 United States Of America Broken Up
2247307 NASHBULK 1945-02 14164 23814dwt 169.50 24.40 Welding 19 United States Of America Broken Up
2247968 AMTANK 1945-05 14164 23789dwt 169.50 24.40 Welding 20 United States Of America Broken Up
2248748 HAMPTON ROADS 1945-06 14164 23699dwt 169.50 24.40 Welding 21 United States Of America Broken Up
5050048 BRADFORD ISLAND 1945-04 14/04/1945 10448 16613dwt 159.60 20.70 Kaiser 133 30258 United States Of America Broken Up
5424079 SIGNAL HILLS 1945-02 30/01/1945 10441 16613dwt 159.60 20.70 Marinship 72 30258 United States Of America Broken Up

7737145 PASSUMPSIC 1946-00 18354dwt L 36222 United States Of America Broken Up

ULYSSES 1947-00 28025dwt Broken Up

5055062 BULKPETROL 1948-01 15591 30011dwt L 191.90 25.60 Welding 24 30487 Liberia Total Loss

5055048 BULKOCEANIC 1949-07 15586 30016dwt 191.90 25.60 Welding 26 30498 Liberia Total Loss
5055050 BULKOIL 1949-04 15586 30006dwt 191.90 25.60 Welding 25 30487 Liberia Total Loss
5541471 BULKSTAR 1949-04 05/11/1949 15586 30013dwt 191.90 25.60 Welding 27 30487 Liberia Total Loss
5080275 CORO 1949-12 18/10/1949 17902 28578dwt 190.40 25.70 Bethlehem 4470 30450 Liberia Broken Up
5263023 OLYMPIC LAUREL 1949-11 31/08/1949 17772 28365dwt L 190.40 25.70 Bethlehem 4473 42304 Liberia Broken Up
5421479 SOVAC ASTRAL 1949-11 20/10/1949 17598 27010dwt L 191.40 25.20 Sun 572 44005 Panama Broken Up

5029415 THOMAS A 1950-11 14/06/1950 19498 30155dwt 200.10 26.00 New York 482 32974 United States Of America Broken Up
5055086 BULKTRADER 1950-05 16389 30004dwt 191.90 25.70 Welding 28 32225 Liberia Total Loss
5263164 OLYMPIC THUNDER 1950-05 24/02/1950 17791 28385dwt L 190.40 25.70 Bethlehem 4475 42229 HND Broken Up
5262976 OLYMPIC FLAME 1950-03 17/12/1949 17791 28385dwt 190.40 25.70 Bethlehem 4474 30486 HND Broken Up
5000330 A. N. KEMP 1950-12 06/09/1950 16533 28276dwt 190.40 25.70 Bethlehem 4482 30640 Liberia Broken Up
5028708 ATHOLL MCBEAN 1950-10 21/07/1950 16071 28074dwt 193.50 25.80 Bethlehem 4481 30640 Liberia Broken Up
5238327 SOVAC RADIANT 1950-03 06/03/1950 17598 27013dwt L 191.40 25.20 Sun 576 42295 Panama Broken Up

5029104 ATLANTIC ENGINEER 1951-01 15/09/1950 19498 30228dwt 200.10 26.00 New York 483 32504 United States Of America Broken Up
5029271 ATLANTIC NAVIGATOR 1951-03 14/11/1950 19498 30228dwt 200.10 26.00 New York 484 32504 United States Of America Broken Up
5052357 BRITISH ADVENTURE 1951-09 12/12/1950 18492 28726dwt 196.00 25.10 Vickers 994 31271 Greece Broken Up
5297969 ROBERT WATT MILLER 1951-04 14/12/1950 16533 28276dwt 190.40 25.60 Bethlehem 4484 30640 Liberia Broken Up
5272098 PAUL PIGOTT 1951-02 03/11/1950 16533 28176dwt 190.40 25.60 Bethlehem 4483 30640 Liberia Broken Up

5415652 PETROKURE 1952-12 01/11/1952 21598 38240dwt 205.10 28.10 National Bulk 29 41615 Liberia Broken Up
5393476 WORLD UNITY 1952-04 16/10/1951 20628 32895dwt M 199.00 26.30 Vickers 999 33423 Liberia Total Loss
5041906 BERNICE 1952-01 11/11/1950 21121 31208dwt 202.50 25.90 St Nazarie Z12 33889 French Broken Up
5043382 BETHSABEE 1952-06 25/02/1952 21121 31174dwt 202.50 25.90 St Nazarie G14 33854 Panama Broken Up
5385974 WANETA 1952-12 29/05/1952 18767 29186dwt L 196.50 25.70 Bethlehem 1629 55207 Liberia Broken Up
5052266 BRITA ONSTAD 1952-06 08/04/1952 18306 28850dwt 198.00 24.60 Gotaverken 656 31833 Sweden Broken Up
5053260 BRITISH TALENT 1952-03 17/08/1951 18593 28625dwt 196.00 24.80 Hawthorn 709 30615 United Kingdom Broken Up
5111593 FAILAIKA 1952-07 18/03/1952 17856 28336dwt L 190.40 25.80 Bethlehem 1627 53282 Liberia Broken Up
5125245 GAGE LUND 1952-02 08/11/1951 16533 28276dwt 190.40 25.70 Bethlehem 4500 30156 Liberia Broken Up
5200576 LA CRUZ 1952-09 12/06/1952 17861 28272dwt L 190.50 25.60 Bethlehem 1628 54169 Liberia Broken Up

5361693 TINA ONASSIS 1953-11 25/07/1953 27843 49722dwt 236.40 29.10 Howaldswerke 885 50520 Liberia Broken Up
5276381 PETROEMPEROR 1953-09 25/07/1953 21576 38329dwt 205.10 28.20 National bulk 32 41642 Liberia Broken Up
5276393 PETROKING 1953-03 12/02/1953 21576 38264dwt 205.10 28.20 National bulk 30 40235 Liberia Broken Up
5276599 PETROQUEEN 1953-06 12/05/1953 21576 38240dwt 205.10 28.20 National bulk 31 40910 Liberia Broken Up
5393036 WORLD ENTERPRISE 1953-06 16/09/1952 20536 32985dwt 202.10 26.30 Vickers 132 35543 Liberia Broken Up
5250090 NEW JERSEY SUN 1953-06 16/05/1953 18810 31878dwt 195.40 25.80 Sun 589 32389 United States Of America Broken Up
5087950 DELAWARE SUN 1953-01 17/11/1952 18798 31878dwt 195.40 25.70 Sun 588 32388 United States Of America Broken Up
5053131 BRITISH SILOR 1953-04 18/12/1952 20961 31825dwt 202.60 26.20 John Brown 677 34293 United Kingdom Broken Up
5386045 WAPELLO 1953-04 17/02/1953 18722 30117dwt L 195.40 25.70 Sun 590 58382 Panama Broken Up
5079082 ANDROS VENTURE 1953-11 03/07/1953 17845 29940dwt 190.40 25.70 Davie 595 30420 Canada Total Loss
5072163 CHRYSSI 1953-02 05/12/1952 18732 29653dwt 196.50 25.70 Bethlehem 1630 31717 Panama Total Loss
5265227 ORION STAR 1953-11 19/08/1953 18717 29463dwt L 196.50 25.70 Bethlehem 4519 40477 United States Of America Broken Up
5265186 ORION COMET 1953-10 28/07/1953 18736 29430dwt 196.50 25.70 Bethlehem 1634 32480 Panama Total Loss
5079094 ANDROS ISLAND 1953-05 06/03/1953 18736 29371dwt 196.50 25.70 Bethlehem 1631 32133 Panama Broken Up
5203774 LAS PIEDRAS 1953-01 15/10/1952 18611 29307dwt 196.50 25.70 Bethlehem 4584 53313 Liberia Broken Up
5352771 TARFALA 1953-04 20/11/1952 19329 25930dwt L 198.60 24.60 Gotaverken 684 31486 Swedish Broken Up
5357018 CONNECTICUT 1953-11 11/09/1953 12789 20743dwt L 172.20 22.90 Newport News 497 39366 United States Of America Total Loss
5357276 NEW YORK 1953-07 02/06/1953 12789 20456dwt L 172.20 22.90 Newport News 496 42667 United States Of America Broken Up
5162463 IONIAN CHALLENGER 1953-09 23/02/1953 13485 19783dwt L 176.40 22.60 Nippon 702 42178 Liberia Broken Up

5277347 PHOENIX 1954-01 05/10/1953 26085 46638dwt 220.10 29.70 National bulk 33 49849 Liberia Broken Up
5393098 WORLD GLORY 1954-05 09/02/1954 28323 46434dwt 224.40 31.20 Bethlehem 1639 47179 Liberia Total Loss
5207653 LIBERTY BELL 1954-12 19/10/1954 22610 39281dwt 215.50 28.40 Newport News 513 41685 Liberia Broken Up
5081619 CRADLE OF LIBERTY 1954-00 23/07/1954 22610 39254dwt L 215.50 28.40 Newport News 512 70417 Liberia Broken Up
5339250 STATUE OF LIBERTY 1954-00 02/06/1954 22610 39254dwt L 215.50 28.40 Newport News 511 70283 Liberia Broken Up
5073167 W ALTON JONES 1954-00 20/04/1954 22610 39254dwt L 215.50 28.40 Newport News 510 70211 Panama Broken Up
5042065 BERGEBOSS 1954-06 25/03/1954 20448 32900dwt 200.90 26.30 Ericksberg 441 35731 Norway Broken Up
5317379 BERGELAND 1954-10 17/06/1954 20448 32807dwt 201.00 26.30 Rosenberg 564 35641 Norway Broken Up
5085536 DALILA 1954-10 04/05/1954 21807 32731dwt 202.10 26.50 St Nazarie 315 35273 France Broken Up
5393103 WORLD GRACE 1954-06 15/05/1954 20431 32570dwt L 202.10 26.50 Keiler How 985 49133 Liberia Broken Up
5393294 WORLD JUSTICE 1954-11 17/07/1954 20585 32551dwt L 201.10 26.90 Mitsubuahi 1440 36155 Liberia Broken Up
5053193 BRITISH SOVERIGN 1954-12 31/08/1954 21138 32265dwt 202.60 26.20 Vickers 1019 35150 United Kingdom Broken Up
5231630 MELIKA 1954-10 20/12/1953 21066 32191dwt 201.70 26.60 Furness 462 34705 Liberia Broken Up
5221207 MARE ADRIACUM 1954-03 26/09/1953 20451 32153dwt 200.00 26.30 Riuniti Adriatico 1773 33193 Italy Broken Up
5052929 BRITISH MERCHANT 1954-01 24/07/1953 21064 31861dwt 202.60 26.20 Swan Hunter 1825 34731 United Kingdom Broken Up
5053181 BRITISH SOLDIER 1954-10 30/06/1954 21082 31792dwt 202.60 26.20 Swan Hunter 1825 34630 United Kingdom Broken Up
5052591 BRITISH ENGINEER 1954-04 24/11/1953 21082 31785dwt 202.60 26.20 Harland & Wolf 1464 34624 United Kingdom Broken Up
5263190 OLYMPIC VALOUR 1954-06 22/10/1953 20453 31761dwt 202.20 26.50 St Nazarie F15 32271 Liberia Broken Up
5005964 PERSIAN GULF 1954-02 29/07/1953 20716 31723dwt 202.20 26.50 St Nazarie E15 32749 Liberia Broken Up
5236680 MIRELLA D'AMICO 1954-01 14/06/1953 20417 31717dwt 200.00 26.30 Riuniti Adriatico 1775 34482 Italy Broken Up
5260849 OCTAVIAN 1954-03 26/10/1953 20211 31370dwt L 198.70 26.30 Swan Hunter 1787 46424 Norway Broken Up
5301277 ROYAL ARROW 1954-10 12/12/1953 20413 31300dwt 201.20 26.30 Nederlandsche D&SB 449 34047 United Kingdom Broken Up
5388275 WESTERN SUN 1954-12 16/10/1954 18810 30252dwt 195.40 25.70 Sun 593 32339 United States Of America Broken Up
5028992 ATLANTIC COMMUNICATOR 1954-00 24/05/1954 18753 30200dwt 195.40 25.70 Sun 597 32391 United States Of America Broken Up
5087223 DE BAIF 1954-12 15/05/1954 19993 29950dwt 197.50 26.10 French 210 30024 France Broken Up
5228566 MASTER PETER 1954-10 01/07/1954 18763 29663dwt 196.50 25.70 Bethlehem 1635 30108 Panama Broken Up
5265174 ORION CLIPPER 1954-00 26/05/1954 18711 29437dwt 196.50 25.80 Bethlehem 4528 30416 United States Of America Broken Up
5265215 ORION PLANET 1954-00 29/04/1954 18717 29437dwt 196.50 25.80 Bethlehem 4527 30389 United States Of America Broken Up
5028629 ATHINA LIVANOS 1954-00 21/05/1954 18785 29402dwt 196.50 25.70 Bethlehem 1637 32193 Liberia Broken Up
5128869 GEORGE LIVANOS 1954-00 30/10/1953 18790 29402dwt 196.50 25.70 Bethlehem 1637 32193 Panama Broken Up
5109459 EUGENIE LIVANOS 1954-06 12/03/1954 18736 29402dwt 196.50 25.70 Bethlehem 4518 31685 Liberia Total Loss
5221817 MARGARITTA 1954-07 07/04/1954 18762 29292dwt L 196.50 25.70 Bethlehem 1643 54139 Liberia Broken Up
5352276 TANK MONARCH 1954-12 21/09/1954 18324 29000dwt 198.00 24.60 Gotaverken 687 31610 Norway Broken Up
5402746 ANDROS FORTUNE 1954-08 08/05/1954 18504 28070dwt 190.40 25.70 Davie SB 596 30908 Canada Broken Up

5393115 WORLD GRANDEUR 1955-11 04/03/1955 25317 39298dwt 213.40 29.80 Howaldswerke 891 43835 Liberia Broken Up
5072137 CHRYSANTHY L. 1955-01 11/01/1955 23920 38632dwt 212.00 28.20 Kawasaki 928 40176 Liberia Broken Up
5107401 ESSO FRANCE 1955-11 21/06/1955 23802 35707dwt 211.50 27.80 St Nazarie 365 36862 French Broken Up
5170252 JARAGUA 1955-09 12/05/1955 21524 34320dwt 202.20 26.30 Goterberg 694 37577 Norway Broken Up
5016614 ANDREAS V 1955-08 09/03/1955 21076 33981dwt 203.50 27.60 Nippon 711 37205 Liberia Broken Up
5042091 BERGHUS 1955-09 21/05/1955 20449 33133dwt 200.90 26.30 Rosenberg 165 36561 Norway Broken Up
5393153 WORLD GUIDANCE 1955-07 05/03/1955 20432 33051dwt L 202.70 26.50 Keiler how 987 48230 Liberia Broken Up
5347233 SULVAN ARROW 1955-02 22/05/1954 20413 32900dwt 201.20 26.30 Nederlandsche D&SB 450 34075 United Kingdom Broken Up
5393397 WORLD SINCERITY 1955-12 06/07/1955 20165 32900dwt 202.00 26.30 Kockums 385 33964 Liberia Broken Up
5157597 HYDROUSSA 1955-09 02/04/1955 21088 32657dwt 201.80 26.70 Harima 491 33713 Liberia Broken Up
5235521 MINA 1955-12 14/06/1955 21090 32587dwt 201.80 26.60 Harima 492 33253 Liberia Total Loss
5069518 CHENONCEAUX 1955-01 28/03/1955 21432 32532dwt 203.70 26.30 France 214 33584 France Broken Up
5053325 BRITISH VICTORY 1955-04 13/12/1954 21153 32334dwt 202.60 26.20 Vickers 1020 35221 United Kingdom Broken Up
5377185 VASUM 1955-12 15/01/1955 20685 32275dwt 201.10 25.80 Nederlandsche D&SB 454 34950 Netherlands Broken Up
5144095 HAVDROTT 1955-05 10/03/1955 20364 32185dwt 200.90 26.30 Erickberg 457 34480 Norway Broken Up
5165075 ISOCARDIA 1955-10 25/03/1955 20708 32107dwt L 201.20 25.60 St Nazarie Q15 63881 French Broken Up
5379535 VIBEX 1955-10 20-10-1855 20787 32095dwt 201.10 25.80 Harland & Wolf 1484 34159 United Kingdom Total Loss
51644773 ISIDORA 1955-06 10-11-1854 20704 32080dwt L 201.20 25.60 St Nazarie P15 63888 France Broken Up
5056638 CABIMAS 1955-01 07/05/1954 21147 31956dwt 202.60 26.50 Deutsche Werft 670 35161 Liberia Broken Up
5202330 LAGUNILLAS 1955-09 08/10/1954 21147 31934dwt 202.60 26.50 Deutsche Werft 677 32967 Liberia Broken Up
5023112 ARGEA PRIMA 1955-02 16/10/1954 20771 31619dwt 203.10 26.30 Ansaldo 1494 34897 Italy Broken Up
5164071 ISANDA 1955-02 30/07/1954 20709 31007dwt L 201.20 25.60 St Nazarie K15 63204 Thailand Total Loss
5096212 EASTERN SUN 1955-07 26/05/1955 18810 30252dwt 195.40 25.70 Sun 594 32389 United States Of America Broken Up
5263152 OLYMPIC SUN 1955-01 08/04/1954 18790 30125dwt 195.40 25.70 Sun 596 31099 Liberia Broken Up
5252842 NINIVE 1955-00 04/06/1955 19674 29892dwt 197.70 25.60 La Ciotat CN 174 30372 France Total Loss
5044128 BIBLOS 1955-05 13/11/1954 19674 29752dwt 198.10 25.60 La Ciotat CN 173 30714 France Broken Up
5267990 P W THIRTLE 1955-08 24/05/1955 16184 25214dwt L 184.30 23.90 Bethlehem 4542 58813 United States Of America Broken Up

5373581 UNIVERSE LEADER 1956-09 08/08/1956 51400 85515dwt 260.50 38.20 National bulk 39 86887 Liberia Broken Up
5110379 EVGENIA NIARCHOS 1956-12 08/08/1956 30159 47122dwt 230.70 29.70 Vickers 1033 53648 Liberia Broken Up
5337329 SPYROS NIARCHOS 1956-05 02/12/1955 30159 47122dwt 230.70 29.70 Vickers 1032 53552 Liberia Broken Up
5384580 WAFRA 1956-01 05/10/1955 28339 45830dwt L 223.70 30.80 Mitsubishi 1456 50560 Liberia Total Loss
5273432 ANDROS CAPE 1956-09 26/03/1956 24520 41835dwt 221.20 28.30 Mitsubishi 804 42978 Liberia Broken Up
5268358 WORLD INTEGRITY 1956-12 06/08/1956 26032 41834dwt 217.50 29.70 Mitsubishi 1460 43187 Liberia Broken Up
5274228 ANDROS CASTLE 1956-03 17/10/1955 24520 41831dwt 221.10 28.20 Mitsubishi 803 46195 Liberia Broken Up
5198929 KYMO 1956-12 18/08/1956 24305 40416dwt 211.70 28.90 Mitsubishi 808 41064 Liberia Broken Up
5189382 ANDROS SPRINGS 1956-12 29/08/1956 23232 39276dwt 208.50 28.30 Harima 497 40546 Liberia Broken Up
5266300 ANDROS SAILOR 1956-06 26/12/1956 23232 39221dwt 208.50 28.30 Harima 496 42421 Liberia Broken Up
5203619 LARGO 1956-11 24/07/1956 23880 38717dwt 210.50 28.30 Kawasaki 495 39969 Greece Broken Up
5228554 MASTER MICHAEL 1956-02 06/10/1955 23871 38649dwt 210.50 28.30 Kawasaki 937 39269 Liberia Broken Up
5388196 WESTERN GULF 1956-03 03/09/1955 23871 37200dwt 212.30 27.70 Nederlandsche D&SB 458 40190 Liberia Broken Up
5096042 EASTERN GULF 1956-05 03/09/1955 24266 37149dwt 212.00 27.90 St Nazarie R16 38629 Liberia Broken Up
5257359 NORTHERN GULF 1956-10 26/05/1956 23721 36820dwt 212.30 27.70 Nederlandsche D&SB 459 38011 Liberia Broken Up
5107205 ESSO COLUMBIA 1956-08 03/12/1955 23414 35793dwt 210.30 27.50 France 216 36950 Panama Broken Up
5114064 FERNCREST 1956-01 18/11/1955 22399 34800dwt 208.00 26.60 Eickbergs 464 37873 Norway Total Loss
5298860 ROKOS V 1956-02 04/07/1955 21028 33958dwt 203.60 27.60 Nippon KK 714 37200 Liberia Broken Up
5314846 SAVINA 1956-12 08/09/1956 21080 33733dwt 207.00 26.50 Hitachi 3790 36776 Greece Broken Up
5369798 TSUBAME MARU 1956-09 31/05/1956 20920 33719dwt 202.50 26.60 Mitsubishi 873 36862 Japan Broken Up
5245320 NAESS COMPANION 1956-08 16/01/1956 20291 33172dwt 203.20 26.90 Mitsubishi 1459 35925 Liberia Broken Up
5002663 BERGE BERGSEN 1956-09 09/06/1956 20428 33015dwt 201.00 26.30 Rosenberg 166 35905 Norway Broken Up
5152250 HOEGH FALCON 1956-12 25/10/1956 20825 32985dwt 200.90 26.30 Eickbergs 475 35191 Norway Broken Up
5251991 NIKKO MARU 1956-08 28/04/1956 20774 32949dwt 203.20 26.90 Mitsubishi 1475 35844 Japan Broken Up
5005342 AGIOS VLASIOS V 1956-06 01/03/1956 20140 32924dwt 201.10 26.90 Mitsubishi 1457 35343 Panama Broken Up
5353866 TAURUS 1956-12 25/08/1956 20332 32903dwt 203.20 26.90 Mitsubishi 1468 35173 Greece Broken Up
5303005 RYUEI MARU 1956-09 26/05/1956 20496 32890dwt 203.20 26.90 Mitsubishi 1470 35785 Japan Broken Up
5005184 AGIA ERITHIANI 1956-12 20/09/1956 20153 32888dwt 201.10 26.90 Mitsubishi 1469 35308 Liberia Broken Up
5073155 CITIES SERVICE NORFOLK 1956-00 22/08/1956 20188 32710dwt L 201.50 27.60 Bethlehem 4545 39366 United States Of America Broken Up
5073131 CITIES SERVICE BALTIMORE 1956-00 08/03/1956 20188 32710dwt 201.50 27.60 Bethlehem 4543 35337 United States Of America Broken Up
5073143 CITIES SERVIVE MIAMI 1956-00 23/05/1956 20188 32710dwt 201.50 27.60 Bethlehem 4544 35156 United States Of America Broken Up
5263956 OPPORTUNITY 1956-05 01/11/1955 21090 32516dwt 201.80 26.70 Harima 498 35350 Liberia Broken Up
5187633 KING THERAS 1956-10 25/07/1956 21131 32456dwt 201.80 26.60 Harima 499 35570 Liberia Broken Up
5133058 GOLDEN EAGLE 1956-03 16/11/1955 20668 32256dwt 201.80 26.60 Mitsubishi 863 35330 Liberia Broken Up
5165178 ISOMERIA 1956-06 31/10/1955 20708 32118dwt L 201.20 25.60 St Nazarie J16 64073 France Broken Up
5013155 ALVEGA 1956-02 21/09/1955 21258 31816dwt 202.00 26.50 John Brown 683 35995 United Kingdom Broken Up

5373543 UNIVERSE COMMANDER 1957-06 30/03/1957 51398 87425dwt 260.50 38.20 National bulk 40 90607 Liberia Broken Up
5121720 UNIVERSE CHALLENGER 1957-09 27/07/1957 51320 87425dwt 260.50 38.20 National bulk 46 90274 Liberia Broken Up
5373529 UNIVERSE ADMIRAL 1957-12 25/10/1957 51320 87425dwt 260.50 38.20 National bulk 59 90272 Liberia Broken Up
5398309 ZENATIA 1957-06 23/10/1956 24790 72218dwt Cammel Laird 1249 72218 United Kingdom Broken Up
5397771 ZAPHON 1957-04 31/10/1956 24802 71006dwt Swan Hunter 1857 71006 United Kingdom Broken Up
5236290 MINNEHOMA 1957-03 19/01/1957 33768 59176dwt French 220 59176 Liberia Broken Up
5128687 GEORGE F. GETTY 1957-03 08/07/1956 33704 58121dwt L'Atlantique B17 58121 Liberia Broken Up
5361057 TIDEWATER 1957-06 16/02/1957 33704 58108dwt L'Atlantique C17 58108 Liberia Broken Up
5107231 ESSO CUBA 1957-12 30/07/1957 23437 51459dwt Mitsubishi 1476 51459 Panama Broken Up
5107176 ESSO CHILE 1957-08 10/07/1956 23352 50424dwt Riuniti Adriatico 1822 50424 Panama Broken Up
5302855 SIRI 1957-09 01/06/1957 20492 50198dwt Kawasaki 943 50198 Japan Broken Up
5276305 PETRO SEA 1957-04 10/11/1956 26035 49759dwt National bulk 61 49759 Liberia Broken Up
5392898 WORLD BEAUTY 1957-04 21/01/1957 27902 47179dwt Bethlehem 1655 47179 Liberia Broken Up
5106380 ESMERALDA 1957-12 29/06/1957 27790 47012dwt L'Atlantique L17 47012 French Total Loss
5245265 NAESS CHIEF 1957-10 12/06/1957 26650 46679dwt Mitsubishi 1491 46679 Liberia Total Loss
5393191 WORLD IDEAL 1957-00 16/02/1957 26032 46139dwt Mitsubishi 1463 46139 Liberia Broken Up
5276446 PETROLENE 1957-07 15/05/1957 26035 45265dwt National bulk 62 45265 Liberia Broken Up
5018301 ANNA 1957-05 01/03/1957 25441 45005dwt Nippon KK 725 45005 Liberia Broken Up
5245435 NAESS MARINER 1957-09 16/05/1957 26650 44213dwt Mitsubishi 1490 44213 Liberia Broken Up
5082120 CRINIS 1957-02 24/11/1956 24304 44141dwt Mitsubishi 809 44141 Liberia Broken Up
5029336 ATLANTIC QUEEN 1957-09 30/05/1957 25156 43250dwt Mitsubishi 812 43250 Greece Broken Up
5029219 ATLANTIC KING 1957-08 30/03/1957 25156 43109dwt Mitsubishi 811 43109 Liberia Broken Up
5367398 TRANSGULF 1957-09 08/06/1957 24037 43060dwt Harima 507 43060 Liberia Broken Up
5393206 WORLD INDEPENDENCE 1957-04 30/12/1956 26037 42877dwt Mitsubishi 1462 42877 Liberia Broken Up
5393220 WORLD INFLUENCE 1957-02 20/10/1956 26032 42813dwt Mitsubishi 1461 42813 Liberia Total Loss
5292373 REIN 1957-11 09/08/1957 24960 39080dwt Nederlandsche D&SB 473 42349 Norway Broken Up
5393218 WORLD INDUSTRY 1957-01 10/08/1956 25490 42331dwt Nippon KK 721 42331 Liberia Broken Up
5003186 ADORATION 1957-01 08/02/1957 15844 25423dwt L 184.40 23.90 Bethlehem 4550 42095 Liberia Broken Up
5108742 ESSO WASHINGTON 1957-00 15/02/1957 24543 41590dwt Newport News 520 41590 United States Of America Broken Up
5107463 GETTYSBURG 1957-03 11/10/1956 24548 41529dwt Newport News 519 41529 United States Of America U.S. Reserve Fleet
5245318 NAESS COMMANDER 1957-04 21/12/1956 25294 39450dwt Nederlandsche D&SB 472 40093 Netherlands Broken Up
5137767 GULFKING 1957-10 17/07/1957 20915 35280dwt L 201.50 27.60 Bethlehem 4552 40017 United States Of America Broken Up

5143053 HAROLD H. HELM 1958-03 14/01/1958 51320 87469dwt 260.50 38.20 National bulk 63 90298 Liberia Broken Up
5373579 UNIVERSE DEFIANCE 1958-00 21/06/1958 51320 87425dwt 260.50 38.20 National bulk 65 95026 Liberia Total Loss
5128560 GEORGE CHAMPION 1958-06 22/03/1958 51320 87416dwt 260.50 38.20 National bulk 64 90244 Liberia Broken Up
5311650 SANSINENA 1958-10 07/08/1958 38562 70630dwt 246.90 31.80 Newport News 531 72914 Liberia Total Loss
5097618 EDWARD L.STEINIGER 1958-09 19/07/1958 26216 48078dwt 217.10 29.70 National bulk 69a 49633 Liberia Broken Up
5215167 ANDROS TEMPEST 1958-08 23/12/1957 27526 47714dwt 225.50 30.30 Hitachi 3799 52434 Liberia Broken Up
5381502 VIOLANDA 1958-02 15/07/1957 26556 47262dwt 225.50 30.30 Hitachi 3782 51956 Liberia Total Loss
5132822 GOHO MARU 1958-11 19/09/1958 28849 46998dwt 223.80 30.60 Harima 523 48518 Japan Broken Up
5262952 OLYMPIC EAGLE 1958-08 06/05/1958 27602 46870dwt 224.40 31.20 Bethlehem 1661 50702 Liberia Broken Up
5262964 OLYMPIC FALCON 1958-12 10/10/1958 27602 46787dwt 224.40 31.20 Bethlehem 1662 50616 Liberia Broken Up
5083227 CUYAMA VALLEY 1958-12 30/08/1958 29025 46767dwt 224.50 30.60 Mitsubishi 1495 51383 Liberia Broken Up
5368471 TRINIDAD 1958-00 27/02/1958 26530 46442dwt 224.40 31.20 Bethlehem 4556 49516 Panama Broken Up
5297294 RIYADH MARU 1958-08 16/05/1958 26034 43698dwt 216.50 29.40 Nippon KK 742 44671 Japan Broken Up
5357472 SANTIAGO 1958-10 02/07/1958 23420 43146dwt 213.80 31.20 Mitsubishi 1493 43838 Panama Broken Up
5245409 NAESS LEADER 1958-03 12/12/1957 26650 42875dwt 217.40 29.70 Mitsubishi 1492 44262 Liberia Broken Up
5245368 NAESS EXPLORER 1958-06 20/03/1958 26650 42816dwt 217.40 29.70 Mitsubishi 1481 44201 Liberia Broken Up
5165233 ISSELIA 1958-11 03/04/1958 27797 42710dwt 220.20 29.80 L'Atlantique Q17 44096 French Total Loss
5253896 NITTEN MARU 1958-09 17/06/1958 25243 42662dwt 211.70 28.90 Mitsubishi 823 41582 jJapan Broken Up
5052369 BRITISH AMBASSADOR 1958-12 16/08/1958 27506 42514dwt 216.40 29.10 Vickers 1057 45672 United Kingdom Total Loss
5052577 BRITISH DUCHESS 1958-10 02/06/1958 27585 42441dwt 216.40 29.10 John Brown 703 46313 United Kingdom Broken Up
5273391 ANDROS TOWER 1958-04 20/12/1957 23607 41816dwt 221.40 28.30 Mitsubishi 816 46209 Liberia Broken Up
5268774 ANDROS THRILL 1958-08 18/02/1958 23607 41816dwt 221.40 28.30 Mitsubishi 817 46206 Liberia Broken Up
5044221 BIDEFORD 1958-09 29/04/1958 26582 41420dwt 213.20 29.60 Kockums 423 42574 United Kingdom Broken Up
5023966 ARIETTA S LIVANOS 1958-04 21/03/1958 23626 41173dwt L 217.10 28.40 Newport News 529 54103 Liberia Broken Up
5124992 G S LIVANOS 1958-00 05/06/1958 23626 41173dwt 217.10 28.40 Newport News 530 44923 Liberia Broken Up
5393414 WORLD SPIRIT 1958-03 29/10/1957 25888 40740dwt 213.20 29.60 Kockums 422 42378 Liberia Broken Up
5076547 AQUAGEM 1958-01 10/02/1958 22129 40689dwt 216.50 29.40 Nippon KK 730 44349 Liberia Broken Up
5248243 NEAPOLIS 1958-01 12/10/1957 24068 40547dwt 208.50 28.30 Harima 514 40547 Liberia Broken Up
5346564 SVEN SALEM 1958-09 16/05/1958 25780 40416dwt 213.40 29.30 Gotaverken 731 43619 Sweden Broken Up
5248578 NEFELI 1958-07 19/04/1958 24256 40369dwt 211.70 28.90 Mitsubishi 818 41017 Liberia Broken Up
5167906 JAKINDA 1958-07 30/04/1958 25271 40290dwt 215.50 27.50 Kiel Howaldskerke 1058 43865 Norway Broken Up
5393232 WORLD INHERITANCE 1958-01 21/10/1957 24895 40037dwt 211.70 28.90 Mitsubishi 814 41332 Liberia Broken Up
5227691 MARY LOU 1958-09 10/06/1958 24065 39275dwt 208.50 28.30 Harima 515 40545 Liberia Broken Up
5352238 TANK EARL 1958-06 08/02/1958 24995 39255dwt 213.40 28.60 Nederlandsche D&SB 471 42323 Norway Broken Up
5048784 MANDOIL II 1958-11 23/08/1958 24978 39185dwt 213.40 28.60 Nederlandsche D&SB 481 42074 Norway Total Loss
5227160 MARTITA 1958-07 06/05/1958 24850 38750dwt 216.40 28.30 Kawasaki 962 43637 Liberia Broken Up
5171256 JEANNE-MARIE 1958-01 25/11/1957 24829 38750dwt 216.40 28.30 Kawasaki 961 43503 Liberia Broken Up
5107774 ESSO LEXINGTON 1958-00 28/01/1958 24539 38101dwt 217.90 28.40 Newport News 528 41566 United States Of America Broken Up
5107281 ESSO DURHAM 1958-09 20/12/1957 24127 36000dwt 210.30 27.50 Vickers 159 40929 United Kingdom Broken Up
5108209 ESSO PERU 1958-07 23/04/1958 23437 35961dwt L 210.30 27.40 Mitsubishi 1478 51421 Panama Broken Up
5108675 ESSO URUGUAY 1958-04 24/12/1957 23437 35666dwt L 210.30 27.40 Mitsubishi 1477 51456 Panama Broken Up
5107671 ESSO SOUTHHAMPTON 1958-11 20/04/1958 23437 35580dwt L 210.30 27.40 Riuniti Adriatico 1839 51463 United Kingdom Broken Up
5108120 ESSO PANAMA 1958-12 08/03/1958 23363 35550dwt 210.30 27.50 Riuniti Adriatico `1836 52679 Panama Broken Up
5106847 ESSO ARGENTINA 1958-02 26/06/1957 23363 35520dwt L 210.30 27.50 Riuniti Adriatico 1833 51493 Panama Broken Up
5170719 JAWESTA 1958-02 21/11/1957 20894 32940dwt L 202.60 26.50 Kieler Howaldt 1057 46992 Norway Broken Up
5164095 ISARA 1958-04 29/05/1957 20101 32121dwt L 201.10 25.70 L'Atlantique P17 64025 France Broken Up
5095713 EAGLE COURIER 1958-10 20/06/1958 16443 26575dwt L 191.10 25.60 Ingalls 1030 40006 United States Of America Broken Up

5373531 UNIVERSE APOLLO 1959-01 16/12/1958 72133 122876dwt 289.50 41.30 National bulk 66 126850 Liberia Broken Up
5284950 PRINCESS SOPHIE 1959-03 15/11/1958 43372 76497dwt 261.90 35.20 Bethlehem 1665 78971 Liberia Broken Up
5264924 ORIENTAL GIANT 1959-12 31/08/1959 43432 70365dwt 259.00 33.10 Sasebo 200 72641 Liberia Broken Up
5384140 W. ALTON JONES 1959-10 69950dwt L 105042 Liberia Broken Up
5247770 LOVER 1959-00 67295dwt 72204 St Vincent & The Grenadines Broken Up
5262914 OLYMPIC CHALLENGER 1959-06 66636dwt 67400 Liberia Broken Up
5202615 LAKE PALOURDE 1959-05 65920dwt L 125831 Liberia Broken Up
5365352 TORREY CANYON 1959-00 65920dwt L 120182 Liberia Total Loss
5083710 MOBIL EXPLORER 1959-01 51123dwt 53032 Liberia Total Loss
5106976 ESSO BREMEN 1959-11 50897dwt 52544 Germany, Federal Republic Of Total Loss
5274137 PENNSYLVANIA 1959-12 50262dwt 51677 United States Of America Broken Up
5053076 BRITISH QUEEN 1959-12 49967dwt 54239 United Kingdom Broken Up
5185013 KENAI PENINSULA 1959-03 48835dwt 51499 Liberia Broken Up
5139557 BURMAH BERYL 1959-01 48585dwt L 74391 Liberia Broken Up
5276989 PHILINE 1959-01 48422dwt 50929 Liberia Broken Up
5108481 ESSO STUTTGART 1959-03 47495dwt 52051 Germany, Federal Republic Of Broken Up
5271848 PATRO 1959-02 47183dwt 50885 Liberia Broken Up
5213133 LOVELLIA 1959-10 47183dwt 50885 Liberia Broken Up
5227861 MARYLAND GETTY 1959-02 47000dwt 51177 Liberia Broken Up
5382013 VIRGINIA GETTY 1959-07 46900dwt 50412 Liberia Broken Up
5224376 MARIFU MARU 1959-09 46876dwt 51232 Japan Broken Up
5367348 DOVE 1959-00 46427dwt 50130 St Vincent & The Grenadines Broken Up
5271654 PATRIA 1959-06 46400dwt 50960 Liberia Broken Up
5263097 OLYMPIC RUNNER 1959-11 40471dwt L 60909 Liberia Broken Up
5106897 MESSENGER 1959-05 35724dwt L 52133 Panama Broken Up
5108613 THEONYMPHOS 1959-04 35602dwt L 51476 Panama Broken Up
5108508 CHRYSANTHY 1959-08 35535dwt L 51413 Panama Total Loss
5357903 ALLIANCE 1959-02 34100dwt L 51650 Greece Broken Up
5284209 PRESIDENTE GETULIO 1959-05 33090dwt L 55379 Brazil Broken Up
5284297 PETROPAN 1959-12 33000dwt L 50696 Panama Broken Up

5373555 UNIVERSE DAPHNE 1960-10 115360dwt 127562 Liberia Broken Up
5166897 ALASKA GETTY 1960-11 73928dwt L 121984 Liberia Broken Up
6245494 CORAL 1 1960-08 66515dwt 71509 Liberia Broken Up
5067912 VENCE 1960-01 52085dwt 53770 France Broken Up
5038650 PLUVIOSE 1960-01 51580dwt 55767 France Broken Up
5357599 TEXAS SUN 1960-12 51032dwt 54311 United States Of America Broken Up
5111517 FABIOLA 1960-01 49825dwt 54869 France Broken Up
5030220 ATTICA 1960-02 49740dwt 51349 Greece Broken Up
5106952 CHRISTI 1960-00 49557dwt 52800 St Vincent & The Grenadines Broken Up
5185312 OSWEGO MERCHANT 1960-12 49537dwt 53736 Liberia Broken Up
5106902 EAGLE 1960-00 49517dwt 51052 United States Of America Broken Up
5152315 ISABEL Z 1960-05 49102dwt 53145 Liberia Broken Up
5362104 OVERSEAS ANCHORAGE 1960-04 48791dwt 52126 United States Of America Broken Up
5331181 IDAN 1960-00 48660dwt 51849 Greece Total Loss
5107334 ESSO ESSEN 1960-09 48535dwt 50907 Germany, Federal Republic Of Broken Up
5245356 BURMAH CAMEO 1960-12 48455dwt 52741 Liberia Broken Up
5391387 WILLIAM WHEELWRIGHT 1960-07 47838dwt 52383 United Kingdom Total Loss
5294864 RIGEL 1960-00 47602dwt 51038 France Broken Up
5062302 CAPISTERIA 1960-07 47183dwt 50885 Liberia Broken Up
5062297 CAPILUNA 1960-10 47183dwt 50082 Liberia Broken Up
5245552 DONA RITA 1960-00 47171dwt 50616 Panama Broken Up
5179727 KAKUHO MARU 1960-03 47005dwt 50382 Japan Broken Up
5263073 OLYMPIC RIDER 1960-01 40471dwt L 60978 Liberia Broken Up
5152339 YANGOS COLOCOTRONIS 1960-07 40237dwt L 77130 Greece Total Loss
5284168 PRESIDENTE DEODORO 1960-04 34000dwt L 52989 Brazil Broken Up
5284285 PRESIDENTE WASHINGTON LUIS 1960-03 33090dwt L 53586 Brazil Total Loss

5245497 BURMAH ZIRCON 1961-01 90301dwt 93222 Liberia Broken Up
5108194 ESSO PEMBROKESHIRE 1961-11 81001dwt 86152 United Kingdom Broken Up
5263229 ANCIENT GIANT 1961-09 76268dwt 78735 Liberia Broken Up
5055593 BURL S. WATSON 1961-01 69965dwt L 106834 Liberia Broken Up
5320510 SEPIA 1961-10 68125dwt 69218 Netherlands Broken Up
5320596 SERENIA 1961-07 67850dwt 60829 United Kingdom Broken Up
5333402 SOLEN 1961-11 67848dwt 72417 United Kingdom Broken Up
5265198 NATALIE I 1961-00 67208dwt 73843 St Vincent & The Grenadines Broken Up
5245461 ONYX 1961-01 66525dwt 71521 Liberia Broken Up
5293690 MOHAMED 1961-05 54419dwt 55272 Iran Broken Up
5112470 ZAHARA 1961-01 54391dwt 55272 Iran Broken Up
5042053 GLOBTIK SUN 1961-09 52268dwt 55639 United Kingdom Total Loss
5238169 V. MADRIGAL 1961-09 51270dwt 56103 Philippines Broken Up
5238195 NAVEMAR 1961-03 51270dwt 55171 Venezuela Broken Up
5242392 PERMINA SAMUDRA XIV 1961-00 50893dwt 54194 Liberia Broken Up
5112872 OCEAN HARMONY I 1961-12 50577dwt 54106 Liberia Broken Up
5020158 ANTONIETTA FASSIO 1961-03 50460dwt 59887 Italy Broken Up
5263542 ONDINA 1961-06 49790dwt 53291 Netherlands Broken Up
5264833 TRADE HONOR 1961-12 49425dwt 54183 Greece Broken Up
5108479 AL SHARIFA 1961-03 49400dwt 53281 Egypt Broken Up
5330046 NIMBUS 1961-11 52634 Liberia Broken Up
5097709 EDWARD STEVINSON 1961-02 52555 United Kingdom Broken Up
5107841 ESSO LORRAINE 1961-06 52456 France Broken Up
5084221 DAIEI MARU 1961-01 52098 Japan Broken Up
5364396 ASTRO ORION 1961-08 51978 Panama Broken Up
5152303 GALLANT COLOCOTRONIS 1961-02 51699 Greece Broken Up
6026862 ASIA MARU 1961-10 51655 Japan Broken Up
5363524 CRYSTAL KOBUS 1961-08 51633 Panama Broken Up
5108039 LONG PHOENIX 1961-01 51361 Panama Broken Up
5005419 AGIP VENEZIA 1961-00 51305 Italy Broken Up
5005392 AGIP LIVORNO 1961-00 51199 Italy Broken Up
5005366 AGIP BARI 1961-00 51182 Italy Broken Up
5013894 AMBOISE 1961-01 50963 France Broken Up
5014068 AMELIA GRIMALDI 1961-00 50906 Italy Broken Up
5230234 OVERSEAS JOYCE 1961-00 50642 United States Of America Broken Up
5107712 ESSO KOLN 1961-03 50639 Germany, Federal Republic Of Broken Up
5058301 TEXACO BRISBANE 1961-01 50631 United Kingdom Total Loss
5068485 OSWEGO PEACE 1961-00 50583 Liberia Broken Up
5241049 MONTICELLO VICTORY 1961-00 50019 United States Of America Total Loss
5363079 TOKYO BAY 1961-00 50001 Panama Broken Up

5253640 NISSHO MARU 1962-10 132334dwt 132333 Japan Broken Up
5219369 MANHATTAN 1962-00 108588dwt L 116508 United States Of America Total Loss
5245253 BURMAH JET 1962-07 90625dwt 98471 Liberia Broken Up
5107786 ESSO LIBYA 1962-09 89788dwt 92865 Panama Broken Up
5152327 CERNO 1962-10 51194dwt L 87649 Norway Total Loss
5107554 ESSO HAMPSHIRE 1962-05 85429dwt 86617 United Kingdom Broken Up
5107748 PETROLA 28 1962-09 86413dwt 86413 Greece Broken Up
5403910 ESSO WARWICKSHIRE 1962-12 86115dwt 86115 United Kingdom Broken Up
5106873 ESSO AUSTRIA 1962-06 78564dwt 84228 Panama Broken Up
5108467 ESSO SPAIN 1962-09 89350dwt 83140 Panama Broken Up
5026102 ASA V. CALL 1962-04 69225dwt 75515 Liberia Broken Up
5164198 KAPETAN MARKOS N. L. 1962-11 69938dwt 74364 Greece Total Loss
5058507 TEXACO GREENWICH 1962-09 58752dwt 58752 United Kingdom Broken Up
5042027 CHRISTINE 1962-01 52425dwt 56701 Greece Broken Up
5267926 OCEAN FREEDOM 1962-10 33150dwt L 56569 Liberia Broken Up
5042015 POTOMAC 1962-01 52268dwt 56532 Liberia Broken Up
5170331 HALIFAX 1962-09 52203dwt 56403 Greece Broken Up
5052448 BRITISH CAVALIER 1962-11 52090dwt 56339 United Kingdom Broken Up
5238171 MOBIL ENDURANCE 1962-04 54345dwt 56103 United Kingdom Broken Up
5167774 PERMINA SAMUDRA XI 1962-05 51612dwt 55832 Liberia Broken Up
5143716 FLORA 1962-01 52053dwt 55716 France Broken Up
5052773 BRITISH HUSSAR 1962-05 55598 United Kingdom Broken Up
5348029 T. S. PETERSEN 1962-10 55515 Liberia Broken Up
5052412 BRITISH BOMBARDIER 1962-09 54984 United Kingdom Broken Up
5377434 ALTUS 1962-10 54736 Liberia Broken Up
5337836 MYKALI 1962-12 54649 Liberia Broken Up
5353294 TASSO 1962-06 54142 Germany, Federal Republic Of Broken Up
5266922 KULAND 1962-03 53913 Panama Broken Up
5190824 SEA BREEZE II 1962-00 53783 Panama Broken Up
5057072 SINGAPURA KEDUA 1962-00 53539 Singapore Broken Up
5263683 ONOBA 1962-06 53444 Netherlands Broken Up
5028021 ATA 1962-00 53350 Turkey Broken Up
5352159 PEDOULAS 1962-00 53280 Panama Broken Up
5107827 ESSO LINCOLN 1962-09 52537 United Kingdom Broken Up
5028978 ATLANTIC CHALLENGER 1962-01 52370 Liberia Broken Up
5318804 AL HUSSEIN B. 1962-00 52332 Panama Broken Up
5070206 NEPTUNE SPICA 1962-01 52234 Singapore Broken Up
5399339 GARNET 1962-11 52179 Panama Broken Up
5137614 CORAL SEA 1962-06 51741 Liberia Broken Up
5323225 SCANDIC GULL 1962-00 51727 Liberia Broken Up
5297309 GALAXY 1962-02 51718 Liberia Broken Up
5410286 ARCO COMPETITOR 1962-07 51536 Liberia Broken Up
5229429 MATSUSHIMA MARU No. 2 1962-09 51459 Japan Broken Up
5397252 CAROLYN 1962-00 51188 Liberia Broken Up
5197298 KUDAMATSU MARU 1962-00 50946 Japan Broken Up
5241116 MONTPELIER VICTORY 1962-00 50244 United States Of America Broken Up
5291953 TEXACO LIVERPOOL 1962-11 50120 United Kingdom Broken Up

5407215 MOBIL IMPORTER 1963-10 102355dwt 105665 Liberia Broken Up
5412648 MONTANA 1963-00 101307dwt 102932 Liberia Broken Up
6401581 DAN HU 1963-00 96140dwt 97682 China, People's Republic Of Broken Up
6107252 PETROLA 26 1963-00 94692dwt 96211 Greece Broken Up
5403881 ESSO DEUTSCHLAND 1963-07 94556dwt 97614 Germany, Federal Republic Of Broken Up
5419206 OKLAHOMA 1963-00 94426dwt 95941 Liberia Broken Up
5423843 ESSO YORKSHIRE 1963-12 94252dwt 97300 United Kingdom Broken Up
5422239 RAMA NATOMAS 1963-12 91419dwt 94376 Bermuda Broken Up
5427629 JAGRANDA 1963-12 89800dwt 92705 Norway Broken Up
5413393 SARAH C.GETTY 1963-09 84263dwt 86989 Liberia Broken Up
5422497 SIVELLA 1963-11 81566dwt 82875 France Broken Up
5401948 BRITISH MARINER 1963-10 74644dwt 75842 United Kingdom Broken Up
5391014 WILLIAM M. ALLEN 1963-11 73149dwt 71728 Liberia Broken Up
5349853 TAIWA MARU 1963-03 72389dwt 74730 Japan Broken Up
6400771 TONEGAWA MARU 1963-12 72256dwt 74593 Japan Broken Up
5404897 HATSUSHIMA MARU 1963-07 71259dwt 76657 Japan Broken Up
5349279 KLELIA 1963-00 69533dwt 69533 Panama Broken Up
6402030 TRADE FORTITUDE 1963-00 65550dwt 66602 Greece Broken Up
5429213 TENRYUSAN MARU 1963-12 65197dwt 67306 Japan Broken Up
5281025 FARMER 1963-00 63860dwt 64884 Panama Broken Up
5042003 MARGARITIS 1963-00 63782dwt 64802 Cyprus Broken Up
5379119 VERITAS 1963-00 63715dwt 63109 Malta Broken Up
5404471 IRINI M. 1963-09 63630dwt 64651 Greece Broken Up
5416670 MEITETSU MARU 1963-10 62181dwt 64193 Japan Broken Up
5114258 CHERRY PARK 1963-00 60960dwt 61938 Liberia Broken Up
5421613 KRISTEL 1963-10 60584dwt 60584 Panama Broken Up
5422368 THRACIAN SHIRLEY 1963-00 60500dwt 61471 Panama Broken Up
5418123 TATSUTASAN MARU 1963-09 60458dwt 61428 Japan Broken Up
5316313 SOUTH STAR 1963-01 60328dwt 62279 Liberia Broken Up
5402916 SAFINA SAUDIA 1963-10 60328dwt 61296 Saudi Arabia Broken Up
5426792 BURMAH AGATE 1963-12 57600dwt 62663 Liberia Total Loss
5417002 OLYMPIC CHARIOT 1963-11 55939dwt 59859 Liberia Broken Up



























6524163 ORIENTAL DRAGON 1965-12 124764dwt 126766 Liberia Broken Up
6525715 TAKASAGO MARU 1965-12 101134dwt 104406 Japan Broken Up
6518542 IYOHARU MARU 1965-00 101721dwt 103353 Japan Broken Up
6515356 MESSINIAKI TOLMI 1965-00 102690dwt 104337 Greece Broken Up
6522311 LONDON 1965-09 102819dwt 106145 Liberia Broken Up
6514625 MESSINIAKI ANDREIA 1965-06 106693dwt 110144 Liberia Broken Up
6510540 BRITISH ADMIRAL 1965-08 111393dwt 114996 United Kingdom Broken Up
6518968 YAMAJU MARU 1965-09 119250dwt 123107 Japan Broken Up
6512196 PETROS 1965-00 78155dwt 81952 Liberia Broken Up
6512627 MARIBLANCA III 1965-00 79082dwt 80351 Cyprus Broken Up
6503066 OCEAN VOYAGER 1965-01 81160dwt 83785 Greece Broken Up
6520569 BORWI 1965-12 81740dwt 84383 Norway Broken Up
6518671 KAVO SPATHI 1965-00 84256dwt 84659 Cyprus Broken Up
6516702 CARDIFF II 1965-09 84620dwt 87357 Liberia Broken Up
6520935 TALIA 1965-00 85680dwt 85680 Panama Broken Up
6512811 MOBIL JAPAN 1965-07 86382dwt 89176 Liberia Broken Up
6507672 GRAND YOUTH 1965-00 87069dwt 88142 Panama Broken Up
6500703 LOYALTY I 1965-00 90268dwt 91716 Panama Broken Up
6510538 WORLD FRIENDSHIP 1965-04 91444dwt 91444 Liberia Broken Up
6421098 ON SUNG 1965-01 94021dwt 95529 Korea, North Broken Up
6503755 OLYMPIC FAME 1965-02 94956dwt 96479 Liberia Broken Up
6505624 UGO 1965-00 96170dwt 97708 St Vincent & The Grenadines Broken Up
6420252 TEXACO MARACAIBO 1965-01 97177dwt 100320 Panama Broken Up
6506355 MALMOHUS 1965-10 97940dwt 101107 Sweden Broken Up
6518061 HAWAIIAN PATRIOT 1965-11 99416dwt 102632 Liberia Total Loss
6523937 IRENES SERENADE 1965-00 99688dwt 105460 Greece Total Loss

6620371 IDEMITSU MARU 1966-12 206106dwt 209413 Japan Broken Up
6524383 TOKYO MARU 1966-01 151256dwt 159815 Japan Broken Up
6615039 BILBAO 1966-08 149556dwt 151955 Liberia Broken Up
6700640 MERRYLAND 1966-11 149513dwt 152035 Panama Broken Up
6606210 BERN 1966-02 149513dwt 151912 Liberia Broken Up
6704311 MOLDA 1966-12 143620dwt 145924 Norway Broken Up
6617245 HOKAKU MARU 1966-10 126067dwt 130145 Japan Broken Up
6604535 MARIPERLA 1966-04 122030dwt 128398 Cyprus Broken Up
6619748 SEA COLORADO 1966-11 121718dwt 130533 Liberia Broken Up
6615077 GOLDEN SPRAY 1966-11 121185dwt 125104 Panama Broken Up
6606014 COASTAL SPIRIT 1966-05 121185dwt 123129 Liberia Broken Up
6610170 JAPAN JASMIN 1966-08 121129dwt 125873 Japan Broken Up
6613902 CHIHIRO MARU 1966-10 120972dwt 124885 Japan Broken Up
6601741 KYRNICOS E 1966-01 120303dwt 122233 Greece Broken Up
6608531 KAHO MARU 1966-05 119383dwt 121298 Japan Broken Up
6618768 NISO 1966-11 119378dwt 121293 Netherlands Broken Up
6607551 BRITISH ARGOSY 1966-07 112910dwt 116562 United Kingdom Broken Up
6709036 GOLAR NIKKO 1966-12 111036dwt 114621 Liberia Broken Up
6621595 KAVO MALEAS 1966-10 107023dwt 108740 Cyprus Broken Up
6618562 GWENOLA 1966-09 102633dwt 105983 France Broken Up
6616095 PETROSTAR XV 1966-10 102077dwt 103715 Saudi Arabia Broken Up
6622020 SHIN OSAKA MARU 1966-12 102052dwt 103689 Panama Broken Up
6613768 JOREK TRADER 1966-11 99347dwt 102560 Norway Broken Up

6726278 BERGEHUS 1967-10 202557dwt 205808 Liberia Broken Up
6700676 JASANKOA 1967-02 154934dwt 170269 Norway Broken Up
6709543 TENKO MARU 1967-06 158101dwt 163214 Japan Broken Up
6718207 SHOYO MARU 1967-09 150728dwt 157825 Japan Broken Up
6720327 MEISEN MARU 1967-08 150445dwt 155311 Japan Broken Up
6729256 GEKKO MARU 1967-09 134940dwt 139305 Japan Broken Up
6729713 SYNETOS 1967-09 132700dwt 134828 Greece Broken Up
6801987 TRADE INDEPENDENCE 1967-12 122879dwt 124850 Greece Broken Up
6705470 CHOJA MARU 1967-04 120972dwt 124885 Japan Broken Up
6702612 MOBIL LIGHT 1967-01 116946dwt 118822 Liberia Broken Up
6722002 NATICINA 1967-09 115600dwt 117455 Liberia Broken Up
6714720 NARICA 1967-09 113484dwt 115306 Liberia Broken Up
6711704 PETRO ABERDEEN 1967-04 111052dwt 111052 United Kingdom Broken Up
6729268 MAGNOLIA 1967-12 110456dwt 112228 Liberia Total Loss
6729414 WEBY 1967-11 108500dwt 110241 Gibraltar Broken Up
6719249 TRADE STAR 1967-08 105127dwt 106814 Greece Broken Up
6705975 IBRAHIM B 1967-04 103785dwt 105446 Panama Broken Up
6724983 ALY B. 1967-10 103671dwt 105334 Panama Broken Up
6721254 KYRNICOS E 1967-06 103000dwt 104652 Malta Broken Up
6802333 PHILIPPE NOIR 1967-12 102885dwt 104536 Greece Broken Up
6729725 LACONIAN 1967-12 102154dwt 103793 Liberia Broken Up
6720767 THEO 1967-08 100885dwt 102504 Cyprus Broken Up
6800414 BLUE SKIES 1967-12 100700dwt 101977 Panama Broken Up
6714081 ALLEGRO 1967-03 100108dwt 100221 Liberia Broken Up
6709232 SAFINA STAR 1967-06 97550dwt 100705 Saudi Arabia Broken Up
6709024 FIDELIO 1967-03 95648dwt 100311 Greece Broken Up

6815938 UNIVERSE KUWAIT 1968-09 326648dwt 332092 Gibraltar Broken Up
6815940 UNIVERSE ISLAND 1968-09 326585dwt 331825 China, Republic Of (Taiwan) Broken Up
6811047 BULFORD 1968-06 214204dwt 214204 Greece Broken Up
6806365 MUREX 1968-07 212150dwt 212150 Tunisia Broken Up
6803727 MAGDALA 1968-08 211789dwt 215187 France Broken Up
6823090 MEDORA 1968-11 210658dwt 210658 St Vincent & The Grenadines Broken Up
6828296 META 1968-12 210233dwt 210233 Netherlands Antilles Broken Up
6727387 MEGARA 1968-01 210067dwt 213437 Norway Broken Up
6818760 METULA 1968-09 210035dwt 210035 Netherlands Antilles Total Loss
6729969 MACOMA 1968-01 209995dwt 209995 Netherlands Antilles Broken Up
6826107 DIRCH MAERSK 1968-12 208899dwt 208899 Denmark Broken Up
6728599 MARISA 1968-03 206937dwt 213630 Liberia Total Loss
6827204 YOWA MARU 1968-11 206557dwt 209871 Japan Broken Up
6822084 MANGELIA 1968-11 206525dwt 209838 Korea, South Broken Up
6807644 BERGE COMMANDER 1968-05 206198dwt 206198 Panama Total Loss
6813681 KIHO MARU 1968-07 201177dwt 201177 Greece Broken Up
6815201 MARINULA 1968-08 198636dwt 198636 Netherlands Antilles Broken Up
6806614 NICHOLAS 1968-05 195565dwt 195557 Greece Broken Up
6813590 GLAROS 1968-07 195119dwt 195119 Greece Broken Up
6823325 ESSO BERNICIA 1968-10 193658dwt 196765 United Kingdom Broken Up
6725236 MYRINA 1968-04 193048dwt 193048 Germany, Federal Republic Of Broken Up
6820531 BRAZILIAN FAITH 1968-09 191984dwt 195066 Liberia Broken Up
6820660 OSLO ENERGY 1968-10 170007dwt 170007 Norway Broken Up
6820804 YANNIS P.V. 1968-07 159194dwt 159194 Greece Broken Up
6813863 TIGER 1968-02 139528dwt 139528 Malta Broken Up
6813631 GREAT BEAR 1968-05 138982dwt 138821 Panama Broken Up

Sorry if this list is too long.
Kind Regards
Richard

JimC
27th March 2009, 13:48
Actually the company name was British Tanker Company up until 1955 when it became BP.

As a callow youth, I remember seeing these 'huge' BTC tankers with midship housing fronts like the side of a passenger ship deep laden ploughing down The Gulf. I was told then that they were '28 thousand tonners'.
J & J Denholm inherited two of the (I think)16 thousand tonners?- the British Fidelity and the
British Integrity and renamed them by removing the 'British' bit and replacing it with 'Gaelic'.
by then, they were virtual 'rust-buckets' and lasted little over a year. At about 45,000T, the biggest tanker in the world around 1954.

JimC
27th March 2009, 13:49
ps was Tina Onassis

alastairjs
28th March 2009, 20:17
Jim,
J & J Denholm actually inherited three of BP's elderly vessels to manage in 1957, the other being the British Destiny. They were all pre-war 12s, Destiny and Integrity from 1937 while the Fidelity, as the youngster of the pack, was completed in 1938. Destiny and Integrity had been laid up on the Fal with seven others from '53/54 but in 1955 the company embarked on a major refurbishment programme for these aging ships, each refit taking between four and six months. All the major steel internals were replaced as part of the scheme. Integrity was re-fitted by Swan, Hunter, Wallsend and the Destiny by Middle Docks, South Shields. All three ships were scrapped by the end of 1958. BP refitted a total of 9 of these old stagers, extending their lives by 3 years or so. I wonder what the company accountants made of it all?!
Regards,
Alastair

James_C
28th March 2009, 20:30
Alastair,
That was probably when the company Accountants first took notice of the BTC!
Been downhill ever since!
(Hippy)

JimC
1st April 2009, 21:26
Hi Alastair!

Actually the Fidelity was my first ship with my brand new 2nd. Mate's ticket. We did one trip. Sailed to Marseilles where we loaded 'parcels' of different product. Unfortunately the bulkheads were so rotten that the product mixed and we had to pump it all back ashore. We gas-freed and went into drydock where the surveyor put his hammer through the ship's bottom. The result was a cement box and a final voyage to Antwerp where we hauled her up on the mud at a breaker's yard. I had her telescope for many years after that.

alastairjs
2nd April 2009, 06:32
JimC,
She was one that didn't get the refurbishment treatment. Denholms didn't have her for long by the look of it. They took over her management on 31st July 1957 and she arrived at Antwerp for demolition on the 19th May 1958, complete with her 'Gaelic' prefix.
Jim, you are propably right about the corporate accountants interest in the BTC. I can dimly remember in the mid 60s that the Tanker company caused them more grief by actually turning an annual profit. This, I was told, should not have happened as the parent company offset some of it's massive tax liablity against the "losses" incurred by the tanker operations. Much of this was on paper as the BP parent insured the ships and cargoes of the fleet, the high premiums the BTC paid helped ensure it's annual losses despite the money never having left the group. Clever people accountants, at least until the BTC suffered a major insurance loss. Carrying your own risks can be a bit of a disaster when it all goes pear shaped.
Regards,
Alastair

JimC
2nd April 2009, 12:10
Hi Alastair!
I signing-on at Tilbury on the 5th.May,1958 and left the ship at Antwerp on 21st.May, the same year.
She must have had a fair turn of speed even then since it's over 2000 miles each way. Either that or my memory is playing tricks with me and it was not Marseilles we went to. The dates are correct because I have notes on these.

James_C
2nd April 2009, 12:18
Alastair,
From memory a similar thing happened recently during the Bob Malone era when BP Shipping (as is) turned a profit, after much penny pinching onboard, although not ashore for the Office Wallahs - for them the high life continued.
Apparently Brown told Shipping that he didn't want them to make a profit, they were there for 'assurance' purposes.

Jim McFaul
2nd April 2009, 12:48
A late addition, The major milestones in the increasing size of British Tankers seem to be:

first over 30,000d British Adventure September 1951
first over 40,000d British Duchess October 1958
first over 50,000d British Hussar May 1962
first over 70,000d British Mariner October 1963
first over 100,000d British Admiral August 1965
first over 200,000d British Explorer March 1970
first over 250,000d British Promise January1974.

I can remember supertanker being widely used in the 1950's once tankers got over 25,000d so that would be British Adventure as already mentioned but how would Super, VLCC and ULCC be distributed across the others?
Jim McFaul

capital3
6th April 2009, 20:02
I can remember being at Mina on the John I Jacobs Oakwood (which was about the norm in size in those days. That was in 1955 and there was a BP Tanker there which was the biggest I had ever seen. I can not recall her name, but she was called a "Super Tanker" and was 42,000 tons. She had what they called a Whaleback construction. I hope this helps.

Ray

John_F
7th April 2009, 20:38
I can remember being at Mina on the John I Jacobs Oakwood (which was about the norm in size in those days. That was in 1955 and there was a BP Tanker there which was the biggest I had ever seen. I can not recall her name, but she was called a "Super Tanker" and was 42,000 tons. She had what they called a Whaleback construction. I hope this helps.

Ray
Ray,
In 1955, the largest size in BP's fleet was 32,000 dwt & the vessel you saw could have been one of half a dozen which were with the fleet at that time. Take your pick from British Sailor, Soldier, Merchant, Engineer, Sovereign or Victory.
Kind regards,
John.

David Williams
7th April 2009, 22:02
Hi Michael.
I was at sea during the "50s",and sailed on the:-
British Pioneer,Resource,Envoy,Hero and the Duke.
Thinking back to that time,it strikes me that the
first of what we called "Super Tankers"were the
British Soldier,British Sailor.I may be wrong,so dont
go having a bet on this,although I would have an
"each way" gamble?

Dave Williams(R583900)

B.Nicholson
15th May 2009, 01:00
The first one was the British Queen about 59/60/61ish and was set on fire in the Lazerette by an arsonist onboard who had previously set fire to other BP tankers.
Bob N

hughesy
15th May 2009, 04:42
That British Queen was my last ship as a boy rating, first time I ever flew too. We joined her in Venice Italy what a laugh that was too.
We just did all the ports in the Med, Italy Syria Lebanon (When it still a really nice place) Algeria
When was that fire?.
I do remember the Captain being ill to, did'nt see him much he was a tall thin guy, I guess the Mate took over his postion
Bought my first guitar on that ship in Sicily, the deck boy was a kid from Soho in London called Mick Doyle, he could really play guitar as I remember, he fell off the catwalk forward with sun stroke, (it was his first trip).
Got a few more good yarns off that trip, will save em for later.

all the best
hughesy

hughesy
15th May 2009, 05:09
Hey Davierh
I hate to have to count the words in that telegram LOL

all the best
Hughesy

B.Nicholson
19th May 2009, 02:13
That British Queen was my last ship as a boy rating, first time I ever flew too. We joined her in Venice Italy what a laugh that was too.
We just did all the ports in the Med, Italy Syria Lebanon (When it still a really nice place) Algeria
When was that fire?.
I do remember the Captain being ill to, did'nt see him much he was a tall thin guy, I guess the Mate took over his postion
Bought my first guitar on that ship in Sicily, the deck boy was a kid from Soho in London called Mick Doyle, he could really play guitar as I remember, he fell off the catwalk forward with sun stroke, (it was his first trip).
Got a few more good yarns off that trip, will save em for later.

all the best
hughesy

Hughesy
You are all over the place. lol worse than me . Tugs, Tankers whatever next? I will beat you though, Have you been on landing craft??? in East Africa ?? I have.... No you have not lol
Bob

Bosun bill
6th April 2010, 23:53
I did my frist trip to sea on a BP joined on the tyne. not knowing much about the ships then. just the funnel marker's so i walk on board the first BP I saw and asked where the seaman cabin where. the reply was I would be lucky as she was not finshed yet. I asked if this was the British Resolution, No the British Talent, i was then taken to the rails and pointed to the Resolution,Which was tied up alongside all you could see of her was her masthead. I was lowed down to her by crane. Open forestill was the accondation. 4955 tonage so if the Talent wasn't a Supertanker then i don't want was. This was Feb 1952

Gordon L Smeaton
9th April 2010, 19:08
Regarding the first BP supertanker, when I first went with BP in 66 you got a supertanker bonus in your wages if you were sailing on anything above 16000 tons so if the bean counters accepted that then as far as BP was concerned the first supertanker had to be the first of the 28's the Adventure

David Williams
12th November 2011, 13:10
Anyone know the date into service, the size (dwt) and name of the first super tanker with British Tanker Co? Around 1952 I would guess.

Hi Roy.
I remember that in the early fifties,the British Soldier,Sailor,
Engineer were called "Super Tankers",we were on 16.000
ton tankers,so we must have been "super tankers" of our
days !!!!!!!

Dave Williams(R583900)

sparks69
13th November 2011, 22:04
..... and if it was really big it was an FLCC ........

reefrat
14th November 2011, 06:13
[QUOTE=davierh;305531]Hi All
Below is a list of the largest tankers built by year.Please note that many of these earlier tankers were later "Jumbolised" by lengthening etc. so their deadweigt increased from that shown.

What a remarkable site this is. I mentioned in another thread about seeing the largest tanker to enter the Thames while passing downstream on the Himalaya bound Tilbury/Melbourne, early in 1965.
She was pointed out by the Master, but for the life of me couln't remember her name, old age and confusion were blamed and an association with the atom bomb dimly recalled was obviously just senile fumbling

But thanks to Davieth there she is, the "MANHATTAN" as reported by the Master as being 109,000 DWT

219369 MANHATTAN 1962-00 108588dwt L 116508 United States Of America Total Loss

Dickyboy
11th January 2012, 16:31
A late addition, The major milestones in the increasing size of British Tankers seem to be:

first over 30,000d British Adventure September 1951
first over 40,000d British Duchess October 1958
first over 50,000d British Hussar May 1962
first over 70,000d British Mariner October 1963
first over 100,000d British Admiral August 1965
first over 200,000d British Explorer March 1970
first over 250,000d British Promise January1974.

I can remember supertanker being widely used in the 1950's once tankers got over 25,000d so that would be British Adventure as already mentioned but how would Super, VLCC and ULCC be distributed across the others?
Jim McFaul

Do the British Centaur & British Commodore fit in between Hussar & the Mariner? they were 60,000+

david freeman
11th January 2012, 19:25
A late addition, The major milestones in the increasing size of British Tankers seem to be:

first over 30,000d British Adventure September 1951
first over 40,000d British Duchess October 1958
first over 50,000d British Hussar May 1962
first over 70,000d British Mariner October 1963
first over 100,000d British Admiral August 1965
first over 200,000d British Explorer March 1970
first over 250,000d British Promise January1974.

I can remember supertanker being widely used in the 1950's once tankers got over 25,000d so that would be British Adventure as already mentioned but how would Super, VLCC and ULCC be distributed across the others?
Jim McFaul

You quote the Adventure Class they where launched as 28.000dwt and amended in the class rules later in the mid 60's when the Loadline rules where amended to your now 30,000dwt,
All those after the Adventure class (32,'s 35's 42's 50's 70's) where i supposed Supertankers. The Admiral Class 100,000 dwt where the first of the VLCC which resulted in the tonnages of 250,000dwt.
Supertankers is a dream and followed the american/greek companies Onasis and those with the cigarettte smoke stacks who continuously broke the records of the day with larger and larger tonnnages> This was prompted by slow steaming and around the Cape Voyages to the Gulf. Before then it was the largest tankers one could sail lightship through suez and home through suez or if deeply loaded back round the cape to the US and NW Europe, and off course East of Singapore. There was no magic in the tonnage just a dose of reality and economics.

derekhore
13th January 2012, 18:31
I was on the Admiral in 72/73 when she was deemed to be the Company flagship by her Captain, Bob Rowntree (coco), who called himself the Commodore - and every port we had to fly a flag from the for'd jack staff up on the bow!
Mate was Bill Hammond and he ran the ship pretty well, Bob Rowntree was rather an insignificant chap compared to Hammond!

linglis
13th January 2012, 19:18
British Respect.
272,000

Mariner44
5th February 2012, 19:43
I sailed on the British Admiral on the maiden voyage. On handover trials in the Clyde a sea valve exploded during pumping trials, and the ship started to sink at Tail o' the Bank. All the crew had some salvage money for the 48 hours or so of work required to patch up and pump out, using zwiky pumps to clear the pump room so that repairs could be carried out.

Happy days!

GeoffreyBH
10th February 2012, 18:48
Kris,
"Super" is probably a relative term. Certainly during my time with BP (1959 - 1964) any vessel over 16,000 dwt within BP's fleet was deemed a "Super Tanker", bearing in mind that BP had nothing in between 16,000dwt & 30,000 dwt. Looking back now, 30,000dwt is miniscule but in 1951 there were not many larger vessels afloat & as far as BP were concerned, at that time, they were "Super Tankers." I was certainly informed that when I joined my first vessel - British Glory (32,000 dwt) - that she was a Super Tanker. Maybe that this is just Company hyperbole but she certainly appeared Super to me as a first tripper.
Kind regards,
John.
I joined British Realm in, I think, 1954. At 28,000 t. she was said to be a supertanker then; the first at 32,000 t. joined the fleet very soon afterwards.
BTW, I'm trying to find other engineer apprentices who started in 1952. [URL=""]URL], please.

Graham Wallace
10th February 2012, 21:03
I joined British Realm in, I think, 1954. At 28,000 t. she was said to be a supertanker then; the first at 32,000 t. joined the fleet very soon afterwards.
BTW, I'm trying to find other engineer apprentices who started in 1952. Email to bp@mailgrey.net (mailto:bp@mailgrey.net), please.

Geoffrey, It is great to see you on SN, if you get any success with other 1952's that I do not know already drop me a line.

Graham

xieriftips
15th February 2012, 15:27
Do the British Centaur & British Commodore fit in between Hussar & the Mariner? they were 60,000+

I think the ‘Mariner’, ‘Ensign’ and the ‘C’ class were all originally ordered as one class. There’s a reference in an ‘Apprentices’ Newsletter’ from the late fifties (or early sixties) to an order for a class of seven 67,750 DWT Steamships with amidships accommodation. Since we never saw any of these, I’m assuming they were progressively altered before construction started. (The old BP adage that, “Every one’s a prototype”!) UK shipyards were chokka with orders at the time so there were delays and eventually the ‘Mariner’ came out in late ’63 from, (I think) Vickers, as a 71,000 ton steamship with 13 x 3 cargo tanks and all-aft accommodation. In the mean time, Lloyds’ rules regarding subdivision had changed and in mid/late ’64 the ‘Ensign’ came out from (I think) Cammell Lairds as a steamship with 7 x 3 cargo tanks and one fewer decks in the accommodation. The steel thus saved increased her deadweight to 72,000 tons. Following yet another brainstorm in Britannic House, the ‘Commerce’ came out in early ’65 as a 62,500 ton motorship (Sulzer) with 6 x 3 cargo tanks, the freeflow cargo system and no raised poop deck. The ‘Confidence’ came out as a 64,000 ton steamship from John Browns in August ’65 (I joined her 2 days before delivery). The ‘Centaur’ came out from Harland and Wolff as a 62,500 motorship (B&W) and the ‘Captain’ from (I think) Cammell Laird as a 64,000 steamship. In very late ‘65/early ’66; I’ve no idea which was first. The ‘Commodore was under construction at Fairfields, but they went bust and there was a delay of a year or so while they were refinanced; enough time for yet another brainstorm in BH and they clagged a bulbous bow onto her. (Same happened with the ‘Admiral’ and ‘Argosy’; only the latter had a bulbous bow.) I think the ‘Commodore’ was finally delivered in 1967 as a B&W motorship. As a result of all the ad hoc redesigning, the whole class were beset by problems and the next crude carriers ordered were the 206,000 Japanese standard ships that started with, (I think) the ‘Explorer’ in the early ‘70s.[=P]

Adrian Cunningham (Elvis)
1st October 2012, 18:39
Adrian Cunningham (Elvis Elvis).

I sailed on the British engineer British soldier British talent British sailor and the British sovereign I got the nickname Elvis from the skipper of the British engineer because I was singing all time and drove the rest of the crew mad and sailed on the maiden voyage of the British sovereign from the Isle of grain to the Persian Gulf. Please contact me if you remember me.

stevekelly10
1st October 2012, 19:49
I was under the impression that the first BP 50.000 dwt tanker was the British Queen ?

ninabaker
1st October 2012, 22:07
It isnt/wasnt a supertanker (in the media's eyes anyway) unless provided with a bike to use on deck because of the enormous length. Personally, this always seemed the height of folly and deeply unsafe even in port, probably fatal at sea.

When I was on the Willow on my first trip in 1972 she was hailed as a supertanker when she went into Lyttleton, NZ. At 21kt she was apparently the biggest ship to have visited the port. We got advance warning of this PR opportunity and had to be dressed-overall when we went into the harbour. Press photographers came on board and took really nice portraits of all the officers.

mikeharrison
2nd October 2012, 19:04
It isnt/wasnt a supertanker (in the media's eyes anyway) unless provided with a bike to use on deck because of the enormous length. Personally, this always seemed the height of folly and deeply unsafe even in port, probably fatal at sea.


Those Bikes were great fun Nina! You could get up a tremendous speed on the 'R' boats (British Resolution etc) when going from bow to stern. They were quite safe, as long as you checked that they had undergone "planned Maintenance" and that the brake blocks had not worn out , before starting off at the focsle. <smile>
Regards, Mike

James_C
2nd October 2012, 19:23
Similarly when BP bought some LNG tankers: they had twin duct keels, one contained the ballast pipelines and the other a general maintenance passage where the walkway doubled up as a railway. They were really quite large tunnels where you'd have to jump to touch the top. There was a 'truck' kept at the forward end and it was great fun to go hurtling up and down the track whilst the ship was pitching (no brakes of course).

Caperora
4th October 2012, 01:20
Those Bikes were great fun Nina! You could get up a tremendous speed on the 'R' boats (British Resolution etc) when going from bow to stern. They were quite safe, as long as you checked that they had undergone "planned Maintenance" and that the brake blocks had not worn out , before starting off at the focsle. <smile>
Regards, Mike

And of course there were always the pallett trucks, no brakes and dodgy steering
LOL

chris dalquen
4th November 2012, 09:26
Anyone know the date into service, the size (dwt) and name of the first super tanker with British Tanker Co? Around 1952 I would guess.

British Adventure 1951 28 thousand tons of pulsating rust when i was on it in 1971 ON 184497 REG PORT LONDON
SHP 12500
FOSTER WHEELER BOILERS
PAMATRADA TURBINES

Mick farmer
4th November 2012, 20:01
Chris that is how I understood it I was on her from March to December 1960

narra
10th December 2013, 17:06
I Sailed on the Sailor in 53 and she was demmed to be Flagship of the fleet and biggest in the fleet at that time . Narra

david freeman
12th December 2013, 09:05
Nigel and John F are right. When the Britsh Adventure was commissioned she was referred to as a supertanker as she was so much bigger than the 16,000 tonners. The reason for the jump in size was that up until the immediate post war period the refineries were all located close to the production areas and their output was distributed in tankers, capable of carrying several grades of oil, of 12 to 16,000 dwt.

In the late 1940's the western nations decided that due to the instability in the Middle East after the founding of Israel they would establish new refineries in their own countries and ship the crude oil to them in larger tankers. Hence the sudden jump in size to around 30,000 dwt.


Incidentally the first six BP 28,000 dwt tankers had names beginning A, B, C & R, S, T. Britsh Adventure, British Bulldog, British Crown (which caught fire and sank at Umm Said in 1966), Britsh Realm, British Skill and British Talent.

The other thing to be aware of is that the rules governing the load lines of tankers changed in the early 1970's which allowed them to load deeper and a further change took place with the move to metric tonnes instead of imperial tons in the late 1970's. The original deadweight capacity of the first BP supertankers was just over 28,000 tons (Pint)and not the later larger tonnages given in quite a few reference books.

WAs trhe introduction of the 28' 32's not coincide when BP got kicked out of Persia, and the access to ABADAN there refinery was restricted both in vessel size and product avaiability and the refinereries in the UK and NW Europe where built, and aden to refine crude oil and just not to recieve refined products?? It may be a question, or a guess-However in a book of my time as an apprentice 59-64 I remeember the ships libarary carrying the history of the BP Group: as one of the 'seven sisters'-This book comming out later in the late 60's 70's(Pint)(Wave)(Flowers)

miket82
31st March 2014, 20:01
I sailed on the British Admiral between 1965/66. Solartron (still trading 2014) supplied all the computer (really no more than a data logger) gear. No end of breakdowns. I remember on one occasion when even the telegraph system failed bridge control was by a series of men relaying commands by voice from bridge to control platform and from there another series of shouts to the man on the manoeuvring valve using 14 inch stillsons 'up a bit, down a bit'. I know, I was one of engine room shouters.

ernhelenbarrett
1st April 2014, 04:41
After I left the British Gratitude/MAGQ Marconi offered me the Shell tanker Velutina of 28000 tons and said she was a Supertanker so were going to give me a Trainee R/O to assist me. I knocked it back and got the Palamacotta and spent the next few years on the Indian coast with B.I. instead!!!!
Ern Barrett

ernhelenbarrett
1st April 2014, 04:42
Re my last post that would have been in 1955 or thereabouts
Ern Barrett

backsplice
1st April 2014, 05:52
Was never on a "Supertanker" the Judge was the largest I was on late 71 but I distinctly remember being in Nagasaki the trip before that Aug/Sept 71 on the Benstac where I counted approximately ?? a million tonnes of BP tankers all nearing completion at the shipyards from memory there may have been at least 5 vessels ......all accommodation aft of course ......I,m sure someone will be able to shed light on that

DaveM399
1st April 2014, 09:55
Was never on a "Supertanker" the Judge was the largest I was on late 71 but I distinctly remember being in Nagasaki the trip before that Aug/Sept 71 on the Benstac where I counted approximately ?? a million tonnes of BP tankers all nearing completion at the shipyards from memory there may have been at least 5 vessels ......all accommodation aft of course ......I,m sure someone will be able to shed light on that
Looking at Harvey and Solly's book on BP Tankers, in late 1971, you may well have seen the Prospector. The Navigator is listed as "completed" in June 1971, so she may have already been in service by this date? The next two VLCCs from Mitsubishi were the Norness, launched June 1973, and the Trident, launched January 1974. I don't know what the lead times were for ships in those days, so I can't comment on whether or not they were all BP vessels.
Following these came the "R" class. Renown (1974), Resolution(1974), Reliance (1975), Resource (1976) and the Ranger (1976).