Makrana

Ian
11th April 2004, 11:34
The MAKRANA/GWWV above, was built by William Hamilton and Co. of Port Glasgow in 1957. She was of 9,745 gross tons and 497 feet in length. The MAKRANA was eventually sold to the Papalio Group in 1971 and renamed AEGIS GLORY, then the AEGIS ETERNITY. She was broken up by Chinese mainland breakers in April of 1974. This was by far and away the best ship I sailed on. Great accommodation and good radio equipment.

tanker
4th July 2004, 15:55
The MAKRANA/GWWV above, was built by William Hamilton and Co. of Port Glasgow in 1957. She was of 9,745 gross tons and 497 feet in length. The MAKRANA was eventually sold to the Papalio Group in 1971 and renamed AEGIS GLORY, then the AEGIS ETERNITY. She was broken up by Chinese mainland breakers in April of 1974. This was by far and away the best ship I sailed on. Great accommodation and good radio equipment.

Good colour of BROKLEBANK LINE MAKRANA she had three sister MAWANA -
MANGLA- MATURA and similar funnel on the boat deck MASIRAH .

Fairfield
4th July 2004, 21:32
Can/t remember if I asked if you ever came across Jim Pottinger or Eddie Quinn on the engineering side.

Bob_F
14th July 2004, 06:19
Good colour of BROKLEBANK LINE MAKRANA she had three sister MAWANA -
MANGLA- MATURA and similar funnel on the boat deck MASIRAH .
The Makrana and Mawana were sisters with one main Foster Wheeler boiler, the Mangla and the Mathura had two Foster Wheeler boilers. Sailed on the Mangla in 1960 one of the better ships I sailed on.
Bob_F

Tony Crompton
28th July 2005, 21:30
I think "Makrana" is or was my favourite ship ever.
I was on her first four trips, first two as senior apprentice
and the next two as fourth mate.

I stood by during the last month of fitting out,staying
at Atlantic House in Glasgow.The ship was just down
the road from there, for some reason she was fitting
out in Glasagow itself rather than in Hamiltons Yard
at Port Glasgow down the River. It was a great experience
watching the final work as she gradually changed from
a Shipyard Construction into a Brocklebank ship.

One claim to fame I have is that I won both sweepstakes
on her first and loaded speed trails.( After loading the first
cargo in Birkenhead we went back up to the measured mile
off Arran for further Speed Trials). A couple of months wages
for an apprentice!! As you immagine I was accused
of cheating or being a "Jammy B*****d" but our names
and speeds were all drawn "out of the hat".

Outward bound we had a great start, breaking down
in the Irish Sea and spending a week or so anchored
in Falmouth doing repairs!!

Tony C

japottinger
28th July 2005, 22:28
Makrana had a prototype installation of two Scotch boilers and one FW water tube, apperently as a brainwave of the late Eng. Commander Jenks, (Jinx?.)newly appointed at Eng Supt. Couldnot been much fun watching water level one on boiler when steaming. Thankfully sense prevailed with succeding ships which had two FW as Bob has noted.

flyer682
29th July 2005, 08:45
There was a very good article published in Ships Monthly September 1993 on this class.
One quote from the article - "Somehow the verandah cafe and the domed funnel went together: both were pretty and both were pretty useless"

Tony Crompton
29th July 2005, 10:46
On Makrana's maiden voyage, after India we did the "Southern States" run.
Ouf first US post was Savannah and at the party, that seemed to be held
at every port,the ship was presented with a Confederate flag.

For the rest of the trip round the Gulf Ports we always flew the Confederate
flag along with the US courtersy flag, and everyone we met seemed delighted
with this.

In New Orleans we had to dress the ship overall for the benefit of
the shippers and agents. To this day I still swear it was quite by
accident that the code flags randomly stung out just happened
to read D A M N Y A N K E E S. I don't know if anyone ever read
them but some time later Sam Baxter who was mate told Alfie Bain
the Master what we had done and apparently he went bananas about it

Happy Days!!

Tony C

japottinger
29th July 2005, 16:52
We had a favourite bar in New Orleans, could it be the It'll Do Bar.
We had a cargo of whisky across to New York on the Matra, somehow some of it seemed to have been "lost". Anyhow we used to take our own bottle up to that bar, with one for the barman, and he let us drink cowboy style all evening!

gwzm
11th November 2005, 21:08
I sailed on the Makrana as 2 R/o at the back end of 1963. A very happy ship as I recall, the "Old Man" was Captain Jackson and the 1 R/o was Tommy Williams, then Brocklebank's Commodore R/o. The radio room was the best equipped that I sailed with, especially the IMR transmitters - I don't remember the power exactly (1 Kw?) after all these years but it was plenty big compared to the usual 100W or so on the other ships I sailed on. Damp aerial insulators - no problem: lean on the key for a few seconds and anything on the insulators was burned/evaporated off!

We were in Aquaba on the outward voyage and the harbour master asked if we could transmit a message to a ship coming up behind us as the local coast station was out of service. No problem! Started up the main transmitter and pressed the key to make the final fine adjustments to the transmitter. The final settings were a bit different from the usual but there was plenty of aerial current so everying seemed to be working. This was closely followed by a lot of arabic babble from the deck and shore crew scattering in all directions. Turned out the jumbo derrick had been rigged and was touching the main aerial. When I'd pressed the key, the salt coating on the jumbo derrick had lit up in a blue flash which frightend the sh1t out of the shore crew in the vicinity who thought we were trying to electrocute them.

On the return voyage, just before before Christmas, there was a pile of crew SLTs (Ship Letter Telegrams) and orders for flowers from Interflora for wives and girl-friends at home. I nearly fell off the radio room chair when I got hold of Portishead Radio to clear the traffic and he gave me "QRY 45", meaning "you are number 45 in the queue of ships waiting to send traffic". Usually, if there was a queue, there were only one or two ships waiting.

Makrana's accomodation was large and airy compared to my previous ship, the Mahseer, where the 2 R/o's cabin was so narrow that I could sit on the day-bed to write letters on the bureau. The Officer's Bar was very well appointed but it never seemed to be used much compared to other ships. Also there didn't seem to be as much socialising in cabins as most folks were trying to get the maximum benefit from the cooled air ventilation system - no air conditioning.

I don't recall the name of the Purser/Chief Steward but he and Tommy Williams, along with a couple of others used to get together most lunchtimes for a card school in the P/CS's office and a few chota-pegs before the obligatory afternoon snooze.

I don't remember the "verandah cafe" at the aft end of the boat deck ever being used for anything except storing a few deck chairs and the table-tennis. The roof was a good place for a bit of bronzy time but there was always a lot of soot so the cowl on the funnel was more of a decoration than anything else.

The one thing the Makrana did have, that none of the other Brocklebank ships that I sailed on had, was a pukkah swimming pool on the starboard side, just outside the main saloon.

I have some photographs from my time on Makrana but they're on 35mm slides so I need to sort out the technology to transfer them to digital format and post some of them here.

japottinger
12th November 2005, 02:05
Sorry to disagree but the Maihar of 1917 vintage, albiet rebuild in May 1957 had a pukka swimming pool built just abaft the funnel, no plank and canvas lash up, but a genuine set in pool where once was a coal bunker hatch.
So there.
regards, Jim

Tony Crompton
24th November 2005, 16:38
When the Makrana was building the 4th Mates cabin was next to the apprentices with the two R.O.s cabin aft of the door in the stbd. alleyway.
When Tommy Williams first came to the ship in Glasgow he was very annoyed
to discover the cabin layout as the 4th. Mates was appreciably bigger than his. He made quite a fuss about this and in view of his seniority in the company the cabins were changed round.

Tommy as I remember was a lovely chap. His wife always made a fuss in the saloon if the boy did not put milk into her cup before pouring tea!
-------------------
Tony C

Harry Nicholson
24th November 2005, 21:35
I did two trips as Tommy Williams 2nd R/O in 1957, he was a warm and kindly man and I have a great fondness for him; that was on the Mahanada. We put into Las Palmas and there was a whaler in port with us, her Sparks came aboard because he had sailed on the Mahanada 13 years earlier. He was was astonished to find Tommy still on the ship after all those years. I think he held some sort of record for ship faithfullness.
Our "boy" found him reading the Koran and told the rest of the crew, the Indians held him in great respect as a consequence.
He asked me to paint the motor room (it was cream and green), he gave me a free hand so I painted it blue and silver as I thought heraldic colours would be nice. It was horrible really, Tommy winced when he saw it but did not make any negative comment; I'm still embarrassed when I remember it. A lovely man, he was like a perfect father to a callow youth like me.

gwzm
25th November 2005, 00:05
Re: Tony's comments - I didn't know that the cabins had been swapped around. From memory, the layout from the starboard accommodation door going aft was 3/O, 4/0, 2 R/O, 1 R/O, Apps, Apps. I don't remember all the names now. The "old man" was Paddy Jackson, 3/O was Dick Masters, 4/O was "Taffy" Williams, yours truly as 2 R/O, and Tommy Williams as 1 R/O. Bob ("Bwana") Stork was one of the deck apprentices. The other came from Morecambe but I don't recall his name. One of the engineering apprentices was Errol Jackson and I think the other may have been Gerry Elston.

I do remember that Tommy Williams had his own special armchair which he said he'd brought on board when the Makrana was building and it had been re-upholstered in the same material as the day bed - all very homely. Tommy also was a compulsive smoker. When he was on watch or pottering about in the radio room there would usually be at least two, and sometimes three, cigarettes burning in different ashtrays!

I really must get those old slides transferred to digital and get them posted here.

= salaams es BV = John +

Harry Nicholson
26th November 2005, 15:15
hello John
I would really appreciate a picture of Tommy if you have one.
regards
Harry

Stuart Smith
26th November 2005, 21:41
I was with Bob Stork on Mahout in 1964 and found him a top rate bloke. I remember that his father held a top position with Metal Box, South Africa. He would proudly 'unpeel' a Tennants can to show us the MB logo/trademark as he reckoned that 75% of western beer tins were made by Metal Box. He grew up on a farm/small-holding in Southern Rhodesia and had run around bare footed all his life. The skin on the soles of his feet were, I swear 1/2 inch thick(12.5mm). When out east and in full Indian sun he could walk on the hot deck in bare feet, when we engineering apprentices could feel the heat through our engine room shoes with extra thick, Calcutta applied, leather soles.
He was an animal (in the best possible way) when ashore in Calcutta and I'm sure he kept a certain Rippon Street establishment in profit when we were in town. He was 100% a mans man and enjoyed life with a passion and I had a lot of time for him. Whatever became of Bob? I would dearly love to make contact again.
While on the subject, does anyone remember Nicky Hirst?
He was a deck apprentice who's parents were Stewards at the Royal Culcutta Golf Club at Tollygunge.
He used to carry out the odd case or two of Gin, Whisky, Vodka etc to keep the bar at the golf club cheaply well provisioned. Obviously the right palm had to greased at the dock gates before hand. Unfortunately one day the greased palm was not on duty and he got stopped. I do not know the exact details but he left the ship in Calcutta and I believe Brocklebanks.
I would be grateful if any further information is posted about Nicky. He was another guy who knew how to enjoy life.
Oh the memories are good, I wonder why I did not stay at sea longer than I did, but then again one only remembers the good times.

Stuart

gwzm
27th November 2005, 12:47
Hello Harry,

Unfortunately I don't have a picture of Tommy. With the gift of 20-20 hindsight, I'd have taken a lot more photographs when I was at sea even if the cost of slides was extortionate in those days.

Tommy was really nice gentleman and, even as a still fairly wet behind the ears 2 R/O, he treated me very much as an equal. I learned a lot on that trip on the Makrana.

All the best,

John

Tony Crompton
27th November 2005, 13:31
Not much help but I had loads of slides from Makrana's first four trips. Some priceless one including pix of the "Damn yankees" flags and the top of her funnel on the "funnel" berth on at Manchester.

Many years ago I had a clear out of the loft and as I had no slide projector decided I would never look at them again so chucked the lot in the bin,including my indentures,Master's ticket note books,text books from starting on "Worcester" up to Masters and a load of other "junk".

I could cry now about what I did!! The folly of youth (or middle age).

The only thing I kept was my navigation workbook which I showed to my Grandson but he was not the slightest bit interested!
------------------------
Salaams, Tony C

Derek Roger
1st December 2005, 00:45
Fortunatly your memory seems to serve you well . I still have my stuff and the discharge book serves well to pinpoint where I was and when .
Still have my Brock Indentures ( on a cloth parchment ) where the Masters ( Brocks ) agree to pay me fixed amounts each year plus and obligation to pay subsistance while at college . The amount for the first year was 180 Pounds ( 1963 ) We had the world by the bag and didnt know it ! Well I guess we did . Derek

Tony Crompton
22nd December 2005, 11:43
Best wishes for Christmas and the New Year to all SN Members and families.

I attach Drubha Paul's Card from Makrana's Maiden Voyage.
--------------------------------------------
Tony C (spent Xmas 1957 in Calcutta and 1958 in Chalna on Makrana)

MITCH
12th February 2006, 14:25
(Applause) The MAKRANA/GWWV above, was built by William Hamilton and Co. of Port Glasgow in 1957. She was of 9,745 gross tons and 497 feet in length. The MAKRANA was eventually sold to the Papalio Group in 1971 and renamed AEGIS GLORY, then the AEGIS ETERNITY. She was broken up by Chinese mainland breakers in April of 1974. This was by far and away the best ship I sailed on. Great accommodation and good radio equipment.

I did my last trip on the MAKRANA 13/01/65 TO 16/06/65.Anybody remember me. I also served on mahronda, maskeliya, maipura, mahout on maidan trip, elizabeth holt to west africa .

R58484956
12th February 2006, 15:26
Welcome Mitch to the the site, enjoy it and all it has to offer, you will find plenty of ex Brocks on here.

ruud
12th February 2006, 15:56
Ahoy Mitch,

After several months,[20 august 2005 joining date] we finally welcome you.?

Welcome aboard, enjoy yourself on this fine ship and her crew, as we do; looking forward to your postings.
From Holland

So here once again the Makrana, piccie was found somewhere on the Net.

Cunarder
13th February 2006, 07:32
I seem to recall that the IMR transmitters were cca 400W but I may be mistaken. I sailed on GWWZ as 2R/O 1968/69 with Phil Marriott as CR/O. Phil went to GBTT after that. I recall the first task of any deep sea trip was recalibrating that hulking IMR receiver - seemingly a new exercise book each trip!

Alan Marsden

noel grayson
2nd September 2006, 01:47
Fortunatly your memory seems to serve you well . I still have my stuff and the discharge book serves well to pinpoint where I was and when .
Still have my Brock Indentures ( on a cloth parchment ) where the Masters ( Brocks ) agree to pay me fixed amounts each year plus and obligation to pay subsistance while at college . The amount for the first year was 180 Pounds ( 1963 ) We had the world by the bag and didnt know it ! Well I guess we did . Derek

Derek, how well paid you were, in 1948, I was paid 6 per month!!

Derek Roger
2nd September 2006, 03:20
Nobby I will take a pic of the Indentures and post for those who may have interest .
Regarding pay . 1st Year 180 Pounds sterling
2 nd Year 216 pounds Sterling
3 rd Year 246 Pounds Sterling
4 th Year 276 Pounds Sterling
and 150 Pounds Sterling for the ;last 6 months of the indenture .

When at College ( Riversdale Tech Liverpool ) we had an additional 12 shillings and 6 pence per diem living allowance which came to 4 pounds 7 shillings and 6 pence per week . Digs in the area were 5 Pounds a week so we were left short before we started !
Happy Days ,

My father who you can see on some of my Gallery postings was a deck apperntice and latterly 3 rd Mate with Brocks told me his first trip to sea on the Makalla which lasted over a year and they circumnavigated the globe . His pay was in the order of 2 shillings and 6 pence a week
Just enough for a tin of cigarettes per week .
There is a picture there of Dad and the rest of the Makalla Dance band in Firpos .
He sailed with Dave Mc Growther who you would have known well .
Also his Budies were Captain John Watson Ross who was an aprentice when Dad was 3 rd Mate ( Pre War ) Others were Yegg Thomas / Capt Brand and a couple I cant recall for now . He sailed with Capt George Symonds father !

Derek