Grace Harwar & Alan Villiers

Steve Hodges
14th March 2009, 10:48
I am re-reading "By Way of Cape Horn" again, and if any of you haven't read it , then you should. I find the chapter concerning the death and burial at sea of Ronald Walker one of the most moving pieces of writing that I know of, anywhere.
Wikipedia tells me that a US company is restoring the film that Villiers and Walker took on that voyage - can anyone give any news on the progress of this project, or when and how this footage might be available? I understand that some of the footage has been used in other films - can anyone give details?
Regards to all
Steve

Trevorw
17th March 2009, 01:00
I don't know much about your subject, but I do know that "Grace Harwar" holds the record for the slowest pasage from Aussie to the UK - something like 180+ days!!

Steve Hodges
22nd March 2009, 19:08
I don't know much about your subject, but I do know that "Grace Harwar" holds the record for the slowest pasage from Aussie to the UK - something like 180+ days!!

The voyage detailed in the book was 138 days, and pretty grim. One kiled, one washed overboard but rescued, the second mate had a nervous breakdown and they all but ran out of food. One wonders whatever induced men to go back and sail again on such ships, but we will never now find out for ourselves, they are all long gone.

daze kipper
23rd April 2009, 23:30
Hi Steve,
Like you I was enthralled by Alan Villiers books. In "The War With Cape Horn" page 283, he gives a chart showing the track westward round Cape Horn of the "Priwall" 5 days 14 hours in 1938 and then the "Susanna" 94 days in 1905!

I seem to remember that the "Susanna" took a total of 9 months to take a cargo of coal from Newcastle to San Francisco.

You can see the videos of his films on
http://sea-fever.org/2007/09/23/happy-birthday-alan-villiers-1903-1982/
or on YouTube under The Cape Horn Road Part 1 & 2

Best Regards,

Rob

Locking Splice
24th April 2009, 10:00
Hi Steve,

Just re reading the Set of the Sails by Alan Villiers, and finding it hard to put down, having read most of his books many years ago, you forget just how well they were written and his passion for sail and the sea.

One of my favourite books in my collection is his "The last of the Windships" a vast tome of excellent photos of his early years in sail. There is a section on the Grace Hawar and an incredible photo of Ronald Walker aloft at the main crosstrees with his camera and tripod.

Best Regards

Yuge

Steve Hodges
24th April 2009, 21:07
I have his first book waiting at the library for me to collect tomorrow -"Whaling in the Frozen South". Took them a couple of weeks to track down a copy, but they managed it. I shall be taking back "The Cruise of the Conrad" - the copy they tracked down in their archive collection was a second edition from 1937, beautifully bound.
God bless the UK library system!