RN Paddle tugs

YM-Mundrabilla
15th March 2009, 12:03
Whilst rummaging through some junk the other day I came across a reference to a class of diesel electric paddle tugs built in the late 1950s for the RN.

I was a little intrigued at the 'paddle' configuration for that era but even more so at a reference that they were specifically designed to handle aircraft carriers.

Perhaps someone could help me with some background as, no doubt, there must be some.

Many thanks.

Peter4447
15th March 2009, 12:20
Dexterous, Director, Faithful, Favourite, Forceful, Grinder, Griper.
Built 1957-58.
Fitted for firefighting, salvage and oil pollution spraying. Electric drive provided quick response to the direct bridge controls, Masts could be lowered by hand turning gear to rest between the funnels when working under the overhang of aircraft carriers.
Peter4447(Thumb)

senior pilot
15th March 2009, 13:35
if you go to the royal navy gallery i posted a picture showing the director alongside h m s ark royal picture posted on the 12 nov 2007 alex

YM-Mundrabilla
21st March 2009, 09:58
Thanks Comrades.
I can understand the quick (and remote) response afforded by diesel electric power but I am still a little bemused at the choice of paddles rather than propellers. Does anyone have any extra info on this aspect, please?

chadburn
21st March 2009, 13:52
Paddle tugs were mainly used as Stern Tugs, when you stop the Paddle's they "dig in" and have a better braking effect, much better than a screw driven Tug which suffers from "slip" although now superseded by modern propulsion units like Voths or Pods.

YM-Mundrabilla
22nd March 2009, 07:31
Paddle tugs were mainly used as Stern Tugs, when you stop the Paddle's they "dig in" and have a better braking effect, much better than a screw driven Tug which suffers from "slip" although now superseded by modern propulsion units like Voths or Pods.

Many thanks - clearly there had to be a reason - your advice is much appreciated.

chadburn
22nd March 2009, 13:09
YM, the other reason of course is that I have never heard of a Paddle Tug on Stern duty being pulled/ rolled over unlike some of the unfortunate incidents that happen in todays Towing World, can't beat a pair of Sponson's hanging off the ships side for stability.

DAVIDJM
23rd March 2009, 22:47
I saw the FORCEFUL in pembroke Docks wales. She was in a delapidated state and was going to be used as part of target range in cardigan bay.

I would liked to have had the opportunity to bue one and use her as a day tripper in teh bristol channel or converted to a nice house boat.

R736476
24th March 2009, 05:40
From the Paxman History Pages:
Royal Navy Paddle Tugs
Seven paddle tugs built for the Royal Navy, with the main role of providing berthing assistance to aircraft carriers. The very wide beam over the paddles allowed the tugs to tuck under the protruding flightdecks of carriers without catching their funnels. Dexterous, Director, Faithful and Forceful were built by Yarrow Shipbuilders at Scotstoun in 1957. Griper and Grinder were built by William Simons & Co at Renfrew in 1958. Favourite was built by Ferguson Brothers of Port Glasgow and launched on 1st July 1958. She was scrapped in 1980.
LOA 157', breadth 60', draught 10', 473 grt.
Engines: Four 12YHAXZ per vessel, each with a 24 hour rating of 585 bhp at 1,000 rpm. The engines for Favourite were ordered in January 1956 and despatched in December 1957.
Electrical Machinery: Each engine coupled to a 340kW generator. Two 600 volt DC propulsion motors per vessel, each producing 800 bhp at 212 rpm. The electrical machinery and control gear were manufactured by British Thomson-Houston.
(see also Ferguson Shipbuilders and Clydebuilt.)