Good Reading

John Rogers
26th August 2005, 20:53
In a previous post one of our members recommended the book called " Slow Boat to China" I have found it on Amazon and its on its way to me. I would also like to recommend a book,the name is."In The Heart of The sea" by Nathaniel Philbrick.The tragedy of the whaleship Essex. Very good read.
John.

michael james
26th August 2005, 22:31
John, Amazon have had a good week, I have just received "Slow boat to China" through them. Have also ordered a couple more of similar vein, will let membership know thoughts at later date.

John Rogers
26th August 2005, 23:29
Thanks Mike, Slow boat to China had some pretty good reviews at the Amazon website. Heart of the Sea is one of them books once you start you dont want to put down.
John

Duffers Drift
27th August 2005, 03:22
Quote: "I had read too much. I remember too well all those sailors' stories of the great gales and seas and tragedies of the Roaring Forties. It was all very romantic to want to experience it too, in theory; but in practice, confronted by the real thing, I was not so sure. Perhaps the moral is: Don't read-stick to the pilot chart for your technical information, and let it go at that." Unquote.

William Robinson from the book 'The Articulate Sailor' by James Tazelaar.

Try and get a copy of this book published in 1973. It is packed full of vignettes of life at sea in large and small craft. A great read.

KIWI
14th September 2005, 04:34
After reading comments on the book"Slow Boat To China"I ordered it from Amazon only to find it was in my local library.Have since read it& found it excellent.Incase it has not been mentioned before I would reccomend "V oyage East" A cargo ship in the 1960's by Richard Woodman. It is about a round trip Liverpool/Far East on a Blue Funnel & is more than reasonably authentic. Kiwi

Jeff Egan
14th September 2005, 12:35
If you like historical naval books, try "Billy Ruffian" the life of a Ship of the Line from Design to scrap, it's a good insight to life at sea, middle 1700s to early 1800s. I enjoyed it.

fred henderson
14th September 2005, 21:06
Many years ago I had a wonderful book called "Yankee RN". As usual someone borrowed it and I never saw it again. It was written by an American who decided to volunteer to help Britain fight Hitler. Unlike most of the Americans who had this compulsion, he did not enlist in the RAF's Eagle Squadron, but he joined the RN instead.
After many escapades he obtained a commission and by an act of supreme irony the RN appointed him to one of the old Lend-Lease, ex USN Four Stackers, on North Atlantic convoy duty from Halifax to Londonderry. The officers soon realised that if they lifted their cabin carpets, there was sufficient hight below the sill of the W/T door to line the cabin with cases of Old Bush Mills westbound and tinned ham eastbound, with the carpet replaced over their cargo, in case of a very unlikely inspection. He claimed that in one very bad eastbound mid-winter crossing the ship received such a battering that the superstructure rivets began to fail and the entire structure moved several inches. Some of the tins of ham were crushed, but it was the structural reinforcement that they provided that kept superstructure from being swept away!
The whole book was full of vivid writing, laced with a joy of life. I would love to read it again, but I have no idea of the name of the author. If anyone can provide this information I will be most grateful

Fred

danube4
14th September 2005, 21:33
Hi Fred, Yankee R.N. Auther Alex H Cherry. Try www.alibris.com Just seen it for sale $11.95. Good luck,Barney

John Rogers
14th September 2005, 22:11
I just read that Alex Cherry.author of "Yankee RN" was a Wall Street banker when he volunteered to join the Royal Navy.
John

Polyglory
14th September 2005, 22:16
Thanks for that Fred,

I have just ordered a used copy from Amazon, look forward to reading it.

danube4
14th September 2005, 22:49
Many years ago I had a wonderful book called "Yankee RN". As usual someone borrowed it and I never saw it again. It was written by an American who decided to volunteer to help Britain fight Hitler. Unlike most of the Americans who had this compulsion, he did not enlist in the RAF's Eagle Squadron, but he joined the RN instead.
After many escapades he obtained a commission and by an act of supreme irony the RN appointed him to one of the old Lend-Lease, ex USN Four Stackers, on North Atlantic convoy duty from Halifax to Londonderry. The officers soon realised that if they lifted their cabin carpets, there was sufficient hight below the sill of the W/T door to line the cabin with cases of Old Bush Mills westbound and tinned ham eastbound, with the carpet replaced over their cargo, in case of a very unlikely inspection. He claimed that in one very bad eastbound mid-winter crossing the ship received such a battering that the superstructure rivets began to fail and the entire structure moved several inches. Some of the tins of ham were crushed, but it was the structural reinforcement that they provided that kept superstructure from being swept away!
The whole book was full of vivid writing, laced with a joy of life. I would love to read it again, but I have no idea of the name of the author. If anyone can provide this information I will be most grateful

Fred
Try www. iswright.com.au Commander A H Cherry.Yankee R.N. 544 pages 1952. A$35 Barney.

fred henderson
15th September 2005, 14:02
Thank you everyone. Armed with the name of the author I have beed able to buy it from Mainmast Books for 10.00.

Fred

Polyglory
29th September 2005, 15:33
Thanks for that Fred,

I have just ordered a used copy from Amazon, look forward to reading it.

I have just finished reading it and I thoroughly enjoyed it, loved his writing style (*))

sam2182sw
29th September 2005, 16:03
Hi Just Had A Book Called The Blue Road It Will Remind Some Of You Old Sea Dogs Of What You Got Up To On Your First Trip What A Good Laught
Sam

Bruce Carson
29th September 2005, 16:27
Winter's coming and it's time to dig out Para Handy again.
As a youngster I read my uncle's copy every time I visited until he finally gave me the book.
It was the first adult book I ever owned and I've have never tired of the crew of the 'Vital Spark'.
The stories are as fresh today as when I first read them and have given me untold hours of pleasure.
When it comes to Scots humour, Hugh Foulis (Neil Monro) still has no equal.

Bruce C.

Peter Fielding
29th September 2005, 16:27
Re. Kiwi's recommendation of Richard Woodman's book "Voyage East", I have also read it and agree-very authentic. I would also recommend "The Antigone", by the same author (ex Blue Flue)

John Rogers
29th September 2005, 17:03
Here are four good ones to put in your Christmas stocking.
"Nick of Time" "Hawke""Pirate" and 'Assasin" all by Ted Bell. I mentioned theses books in another thread but thought this was also a good place to place them. All very good reading.
John

KIWI
10th October 2005, 22:55
Yankee RN is extremely well worth reading @ I have done so several times over the years.One chapter in particular is quite ironic. The author an American as a L/Com is running the show when a brand new vessel is being commisioned into the RN in Boston U.S.A. of all places.An age old Ceremony & he had to perform in froint of Amrican family & friends. KIWI

scrabby
7th August 2006, 20:25
Books I've read and would recommend :

1. "'Seaspray and Whisky'- Reminiscences of a Tramp Ship
Voyage" by Norman Freeman. 1993. Non-fiction.
ISBN : 1871311306 Publ. - 'Anna Livia Press, Dublin'.
An account of a tramp ship voyage carrying a cargo of
whisky from Liverpool to New Orleans.

2. "Desperate Voyage" by John Caldwell. 1949. Non-fiction.
ISBN : 0-924486-20-1 Reprint Publ. by 'Sheridan House'.
1991. An account of a single-handed Pacific voyage by sloop
from Panama to Fiji in 1946. A gripping tale.

3. "'Sparks at Sea'- The Experiences of a ship's Radio Officer"
by R.W. Chandler. 1973. Non-fiction. ISBN : 0715359533
Publ. - 'David & Charles : Newton Abbot'. An account of the
author's experiences sailing worldwide between the wars.

4. 'The Voyage of the Mir-El-Lah' by Lorenzo Ricciardi. 1980.
Non-fiction. ISBN : 0-670-74831-5 Publ. - 'The Viking Press,
New York'. An account of a voyage on a dhow from the Persian
Gulf to Kenya. A Fascinating tale.

Trader
8th August 2006, 01:36
Books I've read and would recommend :

1. "'Seaspray and Whisky'- Reminiscences of a Tramp Ship
Voyage" by Norman Freeman. 1993. Non-fiction.
ISBN : 1871311306 Publ. - 'Anna Livia Press, Dublin'.
An account of a tramp ship voyage carrying a cargo of
whisky from Liverpool to New Orleans..

Hi Scrabby,

I have read the above book and what a good read it is if you are or have been a seaman.
I have just read another good book(took it back to the library today) titled "Sea like a Mirror" by Alan Jones. The story of a Furness Withy apprentice who went on to become master eventually after trying his luck with various other companies. New publication this year.

Looking back over this thread from last year I noticed "Slow Boats to China" mentioned, I presume the author was Gavin Young. I read this a few years ago and the sequel to it "Slow Boats Home". Both really interesting books.
Another one of his is "In Search of Conrad" where he retraced the steps of Joseph Conrads voyages around Singapore, Sumatra, Java, Borneo and the Celebes. Fascinating story. I managed to buy it when my local library had a sale.

Trader.

LEEJ
8th August 2006, 07:38
Can I recommend "This Thing of Darkness" by Harry Thompson. It is the story of Capt. Fitzroys' voyages in Terra Del Fuego.Absolutely enthralling.A great man totally underestimated by history. And of course all of Patrick O'Brians gems.

vic pitcher
8th August 2006, 09:33
[QUOTE=scrabby]Books I've read and would recommend :

1. "'Seaspray and Whisky'- Reminiscences of a Tramp Ship
Voyage" by Norman Freeman. 1993. Non-fiction.
ISBN : 1871311306 Publ. - 'Anna Livia Press, Dublin'.
An account of a tramp ship voyage carrying a cargo of
whisky from Liverpool to New Orleans.

I was lent "Seaspray & Whiskey" by Kieron O'Higgins of Irish Lights, a friend of Norman Freeman.
I was determined to identify the ship involved and with the aid of a couple of WSS reference books etc I succeeded after 10 minutes. I returned the book to Kieron who passed my conclusions back to Norman who wrote to me confirming my conclusions and gave me a new copy of his book.
of course, I cannot reveal the answers here on this site, but all the clues are in the book.

price
8th August 2006, 14:54
If you enjoy Gavin Youngs' 'Slow Boats to China' and should you also be a 'Conrad' devotee, I strongly recommend 'In search of Conrad', by the same author. Farley Mowatts' 'Serpents Coil' is a good read as well. I seem to remember a mention in a previous thread that the 'Serpents Coil' was available on the 'Amazon' site.
Bruce. (*))

Trader
8th August 2006, 15:25
If you enjoy Gavin Youngs' 'Slow Boats to China' and should you also be a 'Conrad' devotee, I strongly recommend 'In search of Conrad', by the same author. Farley Mowatts' 'Serpents Coil' is a good read as well. I seem to remember a mention in a previous thread that the 'Serpents Coil' was available on the 'Amazon' site.
Bruce. (*))

Hi Bruce,

Did you read my post headed "Sea books". I managed to buy "In Search of Conrad" in a sale at Dover library. The library is just around the corner from Bill Stones old pub. (*))

Alec.

leggoaft
8th August 2006, 15:51
Another very good read is "Dog Collar round the Docks" by Rev Bob Evans.

Best Wishes Will

price
8th August 2006, 20:33
Hi Alec,
I was too hasty and did'nt read through the previous contributions thoroughly enough, sorry about that.
At least we agree that 'In search of Conrad' is worth reading. I had a short message from Bill this evening.
Best wishes Bruce (*))

scrabby
8th August 2006, 21:17
Originally posted by Trader
I have just read another good book titled "Sea like a Mirror" by Alan Jones.

Looking back over this thread from last year I noticed "Slow Boats to China" mentioned. I read this a few years ago and the sequel to it "Slow Boats Home". I presume the author was Gavin Young. Another one of his is "In Search of Conrad".

Hi Trader

I recently obtained a copy of "The Sea Years of Joseph Conrad" by Jerry Allen. 1965. Publ. Doubleday. LCCCN : 65-19927. This book covers Conrad's time at sea and relates the important events from that period that he used as source material for his novels. I haven't read it yet.

I haven't yet come across any of the books mentioned by the other posters and yourself but I intend to check all of them out.

Having read Vic Pitcher's posting I might look again at "Seaspray and Whiskey" for likely clues towards identifying the ship.

On a different tack I came across an interesting website on a historical maritime topic :

http://www.theatrehebrides.com/metagama/history/

it's about a stageplay - Metagama by Dermot Healy, scripted for the Stornoway based 'Theatre Hebrides', about the emigrants who sailed on the Canadian Pacific passenger liner 'Metagama' from Lewis to Ontario on April 26, 1923.

- scrabby

vic pitcher
9th August 2006, 07:23
Scrabby

When you've reached your conclusion, send me a PM & I'll confirm yes or no!

jrx
9th August 2006, 20:07
I'm busy reading a Furnace Afloat by Joe Jackson An account of the survivors of the clipper Hornet. They sailed 4,300 miles over 6 weeks in an open boat. At the moment water is again running out. The account is so harrowing that I am really appreciating every meal and drop of water that passes my lips.
A very well written book. (Read)

paolofed
11th August 2006, 11:42
if anybody can read italian, I would suggest my own book "La nave dei sogni". A time-traveller (ever seen "back to the future"?) is able to go back in time to the year 1976 and live on board the vessel Federico C, the same where - at that time - I was embarked on as a young purser! Dreaming is remembering. To know more just a click: http://www.paolofederici.it/Libri/covernave.htm
byby
Paolo

Trader
11th August 2006, 18:09
Scrabby

When you've reached your conclusion, send me a PM & I'll confirm yes or no!

Hi Vic,

I must go down the library and read it again to reach a conclusion. Don't make it public please until I have read it again. (*))

Alec.

Frank P
12th August 2006, 10:42
I have just finished reading "Down to the Sea" by Shalimar (F.C. Hendry), it is a book of 22 short stories, everything from sailing ships to tramp steamers, it is a great book, a good easy read, the book was published in 1937. I have just got another book "Land and Sea" by the same author, I will post a remark if it is as good as the other one.

Frank

vic pitcher
12th August 2006, 16:35
I have just finished reading "Down to the Sea" by Shalimar (F.C. Hendry), it is a book of 22 short stories, everything from sailing ships to tramp steamers, it is a great book, a good easy read, the book was published in 1937. I have just got another book "Land and Sea" by the same author, I will post a remark if it is as good as the other one.

Frank I agree with you about "Shalimar"
I think he is the greatest writer of the sea in the 20th Century.
I have been collecting his books for 20 years.
I recommend "A Windjammer's Half-Deck" "Ships and Men" and "True Tales of Sail and Steam"

Frank P
12th August 2006, 22:45
I agree with you about "Shalimar"
I think he is the greatest writer of the sea in the 20th Century.
I have been collecting his books for 20 years.
I recommend "A Windjammer's Half-Deck" "Ships and Men" and "True Tales of Sail and Steam"

Vic, I will look for the other books. I think that when reading his (Shalimar) stories, you can actually picture yourself onboard the ships, nostalgia is the word, they are a really good read.

Frank

stein
11th November 2006, 19:01
To all you Anglo-Americans out there, I would like to reccommend a writer well known to all scandinavian readers of sea litterature: Harry Martinson, Nobel prize winner and long time stoker. This man wrote more beutifully of coal than what nearly all others do on women. (But he wrote well on women too...)Two books made many scandinavians go to sea: "Cape Farewell" 1933, (English translation 1936). And "Voyages without destination" 1932 (Translated?)
Steam-tramp lovers in particular, note those two books! Stein

Nigel Wing
20th March 2007, 20:41
I would highly recommend, Steaming to Bamboola, by Christopher Buckley. The world of a tramp freighter, it's a tale all Merchant Navy personnel will identify with, all the characters you have ever met at sea are here.
Also, as others have said, In Search of Conrad, is first class.
Best wishes.
Nigel.

KIWI
25th March 2007, 21:14
THE OUTLAW SEA A World Of Freedom,Chaos,& Crime.Author William Langewiesche,Published North Point Press,New York.A very good read for most members of SN.It deals with flags of convenience,low paid crews,unknown owners & general lack of supervision of aged shipping.Disasters quoted are Kristal,Alondra Rainbow[piracy it was pinched],Estonia & last chapter is on Alang.Torrey Canyon & Exxon Valdez are also in the text.Very interesting book. Kiwi

Duncan112
27th March 2007, 21:04
Another Richard Woodman book - Endangered Species - readily available on Amazon and abebooks, don't know if anyone else felt this about this book but I sailed with these men, an excellent (and sad) description of the twilight of the British MN

Chillytoes
10th June 2007, 12:10
Try anything by William McFee. One of the very few former engineers turned author I have been able to find, for after a while "the wheel's kick and the wind's song/loneliness of command" genre can get a little tedious.
I remember some years ago in "Wooden Boat" magazine they ran a feature on the best ten maritime authors and McFee was one. Well worth a look.

JeffM
16th July 2007, 14:12
The problem of serial reading and posting. Posted this on Marconi Sahibs fiction site. "A bit late, but not mentioned so far, and it is non fiction. Ray Parkin's 1997 HM Bark Endeavour. Not only reproduces in large scale drawings from original plans of Endeavour (cased edition) and details the fitting out but has edited together in side by side, day by day, form the diaries of Cook, Banks, Hickes, Molyneux, Pickersgill and others plus the ships log. Later published in paperback. Better than Horatio H."

Duncan112
16th July 2007, 20:31
Halfway house between fiction and non fiction as it is a description of two voyages from Grimsby rolled into one "Lovely she goes" by William Mitford is an entertaining read.

Shed a tear for what our deep water fishiong fleet once was.

Whenever I need a good belly laugh I read the description of Mac the B*s*ard and his canary yellow trawler, shooting bridge windows out on the other trawlers.

Duncan

Duncan112
7th April 2008, 20:44
The thread on NZ Scows reminded me of the book "From Kauri Trees to Sunlit Seas" by Don Silk as a good read on a sailor made good by his own resources - started off as a truck driver - became a ship owner - and lost the ship.

Why did it remind me of Scows - because Dons last job was skipper of the garbage scow in Pago Pago!!

3 copies on Amazon at over 100 each - got mine from Whitcoulls in Wellington about 10 years ago for $NZ15 I think.

If you find a copy enjoy!!

Duncan

hughesy
10th April 2008, 09:49
"grey seas under" by canadian Farley Mowat, great book about the role of salvage tugs and the WW11 convoys out of Halifax Nova Scotia and Newfoundland, the Foundation Franklin is the vessel in the book.

Before I'd read the book I worked with Farley's son Pete Mowat,(the head Ranger on the fire told me he was a famous Canadian Authors son) on a forest fire in Northern Alberta, and had the honour of telling him he was a Dad for the first time, also met some guys in Halifax NS who had sailed on these tugs during the war.
So the book had a lot of connections for me like.
But its a cracking yarn about Tugs.

All the best
Hughesy

Jim Harris
14th April 2008, 12:23
Thank you shipmates for all the book leads that
you've given me.... and can I suggest a trio that
I thoroughly enjoyed?

'UNDER EIGHT FLAGS' by Tony Winstanley comes in 3 softback books covering his apprenticeship with Paddy Hendersons.... his ongoing
career.... until his sea-going retirement.

Easy to read, and very entertaining.

And if these books have been previewed before, I'm sorry, but
I didn't spot them.

Regards,

Jim.

oceangoer
1st May 2008, 04:31
Can I recommend :- "Eight Bells & Top Masts" by Christopher Lee.

A diarised voyage by a first trip cadet in a tramp around the world chasing cargo 1958/59.

timo
1st May 2008, 06:25
'Before the box boats' by Sandy Kinghorn, about life as a cadet to master with Blue Star shipping. Good book,

ROBERT HENDERSON
1st May 2008, 12:01
A good place to look for books is Bookbarn between Bristol and Bath. They have a massive collection of used books covering every genre. They have a website for orders by internet. www.look4abook.com

joebuckham
1st May 2008, 12:33
Can I recommend :- "Eight Bells & Top Masts" by Christopher Lee.

you certainly can, read it years ago and just in the process of a second reading

oceangoer
1st June 2008, 03:06
I have just read another good book titled "Sea like a Mirror" by Alan Jones. The story of a Furness Withy apprentice who went on to become master eventually after trying his luck with various other companies.

I have just read and then reread this book. I get the feeling from the time of Jones's transfer to CY Tung things started to go downhill (personally) which culminated in the events which led to his dismissal from "Century Hope" at Long Beach.

My guess is that there's more to this than is than revealed in those few plain paragraphs near the end of the book. USCG reports indicate a blood alcohol level of 0.07 a couple of hours after the vessel was stopped which indicates that perhaps more than a couple of the admitted nips was consumed.

Any thoughts ??

JT McRae
1st June 2008, 03:33
Hi all
A great sea story I read years ago was "Steaming to Bamboola: the world of a tramp freighter", by Christopher Buckley. A really good read, about a voyage of a tramp steamer, under the US flag.

charles henry
1st June 2008, 15:29
Bruce, as a boy I enjoyed Para Handy and many years later I named my first boat "Vital Spark" but unfortunately it was not a "puffer".
For good seagoing yarns I recommend
Alister Maclean = Hammod Innes - and of course Nicholas Monsarrat.
Regards Chas Henry (Pint)

BobClay
28th September 2008, 09:08
I'd like to recommend the book 'Convoy' by Martin Middlebrook.

It covers the crossing of the North Atlantic by two convoys in early 1943, a turning point year in the battle for the Atlantic.

Mr Middlebrook wonderfully interleaves technical details with the sheer horror and human tragedy of that battle and that time, told from all sides.

I couldn't put it down.

angierad
19th November 2008, 05:46
Has anyone read "Operation Fish" by Alfred Draper? It's the story of how England's wealth was secretly shipped out of that country to Canada during WW II.

Recently I found out that my father had been on one of the ships in the convoys so that book has a connection for me.

reg
19th November 2008, 08:34
Eight bells and top masts by Christopher Lee, Diaries from a tramp steamer, when I Read this, it was as though I was reading about my first trip to sea

Lewis
19th November 2008, 15:17
Very true Reg. All the way through the book I kept thinking that the author had been looking over my shoulder.

andysk
15th December 2008, 11:57
Gavin Young's Slow Boat to China has been mentioned several times, for another good read try his return from the Far East, east about, called 'Slow Boat Home'

jelecky
15th December 2008, 12:55
Recommend Voyage East by Richard Woodman to all ex MN's,especially Blu Flu,good read.

John Williams 56-65
7th April 2009, 20:27
For those who are interested in the old sailing ships I would recommend a book I am reading for the second time. It is called " The Way of a Ship" by Derek Lundy.This is a comparatively recent book first published in 2002. It is the story of a four masted Barque carrying a cargo of coal from Liverpool to Valparaiso via Cape Horne in the early years of the last century. The hardships and conditions those seamen endured are hardly believable by modern seamen. It took the ship eight days to get into the Atlantic from Liverpool, fighting wind and tide all the way, sailing a thousand miles to make two hundred and fifty miles southing. Well worth a read.

Binnacle
11th May 2009, 09:17
This is the best book I have read for a while. There was a serious shortage of ball bearings and precision machinery in the UK during WW2, this is an account of the attempts to overcome this by running these vital materials from neutral Sweden through German controlled waters to the UK. Manned by British and Norwegian merchant seamen, some of whom had escaped from Narvik, latterly brave men from Ellerman's Wilson Line in Hull. Non fiction, hard back, 224 pp. ISBN 1844152820. Author Ralph Barker. Your library may have it, my copy came from www.naval-military-press.com. Price 4.95 p&p 3.85
Enjoy

jmcg
18th June 2009, 08:06
ALL HANDS AND THE COOK - The Customs and Language of the British Merchant Seaman 1875 -1975.

Author: Capt. Barry Thompson

Publisher: The Bush Press.

Comment. Essential literature.

BW
J

Quiney
9th October 2009, 22:39
For those who are interested in the old sailing ships I would recommend a book I am reading for the second time. It is called " The Way of a Ship" by Derek Lundy.This is a comparatively recent book first published in 2002. It is the story of a four masted Barque carrying a cargo of coal from Liverpool to Valparaiso via Cape Horne in the early years of the last century. The hardships and conditions those seamen endured are hardly believable by modern seamen. It took the ship eight days to get into the Atlantic from Liverpool, fighting wind and tide all the way, sailing a thousand miles to make two hundred and fifty miles southing. Well worth a read.

Just finished this one myself and have to agree that it is an interesting read. The main story is fictional based on known facts , but there is also lots of facts and figures about sailing ships and the Cape route (Thumb)

Nigel Wing
6th December 2010, 11:35
Before the Mast. In the Grain Races of the 1930's. from the original logs of Geoffrey Robertshaw. ISBN 0-9559950-0-0
Geoffrey Robertshaw served as an AB on the Olivebank. Winterhude. and Ponape.

This book is well worth purchasing, 290 pages, and you will finish it in a day!!

Cheers
Nigel.

Nigel Wing
6th December 2010, 11:45
The World is my Ocean. by John Briggs.
I have my copy signed by the author, which I purchased while in WA early this year. Thoroughly enjoyed the read.

Also, Trident Tankers Ltd. a change of course. By Michael Langley. is well put together. I sailed with this author when he was Chief Officer on mv Ardmay during 1977. so found the research and pictures extremely interesting.

Cheers
Nigel.

TonyAllen
6th December 2010, 16:58
Read most of the books mentioned but also one that was a very good read called the ice master and how the master and the crew drifted in the artic sea
Tony

NoR
6th December 2010, 18:21
'Old Glory' by Jonathan Raban (http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_24?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=old+glory+jonathan+raban&sprefix=old+glory+jonathan+raban)

Account of a trip down the Mississippi in a small boat.

fisherman
11th December 2010, 19:56
For the trawlermen out there, or any one who enjoys a good read, The Red Charger, is a good one, read it a good few years ago so i cant remember the author, it's about a guy who after leaving the army joins an east coast trawler on the white fish, on a coal burner some very good descriptions of conditions, the weather the fishing the boiling down of cods livers,fishing right up to the ice, will have to find it again. got rid of many of my books when the house was re wired had to empty the roof space, act in haste repent at lesure cheers Fisherman

Nigel Wing
16th December 2010, 18:55
I am now reading. Master Mariner. A life underway. by Captain Philip Rentell.
ISBN 978-1-906266-13-4
It is worth buying.
Cheers
Nigel.

borderreiver
16th December 2010, 19:41
I am now reading. Master Mariner. A life underway. by Captain Philip Rentell.
ISBN 978-1-906266-13-4
It is worth buying.
Cheers
Nigel.

Brought a copy some time ago. not to my liking.

Bob Murdoch
18th December 2010, 11:50
Hi, Just finished re-reading for the umpteenth time, Sir James Bisset's autobiographical threesome. Covers the lot from his apprenticeship on a full rigger (did his time in two trips) through his changeover at the turn of the 20th century as 3rd, 2nd and Mate on both sail and steam tramps, till his finally getting Master and extra Master and almost by chance getting a job the day he got his extra masters with Cunard, up to his final job (at sea) as Commodore. A great read. Only available second hand now though.
Sail Ho, 1898 - 1904
Tramps and Ladies, 1904 - 1913 ( He was 2nd Officer on the Carpathia during the Titanic episode)
Commodore, War, Peace and Big Ships. 1914 to retirement 1947
Great read,
Cheers, Bob

KIWI
20th December 2010, 23:45
I do not think it has been mentioned but for those interested in sailing chips "Pamir Under The New Zealand Ensign" author Jack Churchouse is well worth reading.It covers her voyages to Vancouver & San Francisco during the war years & is a large book very well illustrated.The author gave me a copy which was not returned when lent.I managed to track down another copy at quite some expense but felt better about it when the vendor told me $500 was being paid for a copy in Germany.It really is a must read for sailig ship enthusiasts. KIWI

Bob Murdoch
28th December 2010, 17:47
I do not think it has been mentioned but for those interested in sailing chips "Pamir Under The New Zealand Ensign" author Jack Churchouse is well worth reading.It covers her voyages to Vancouver & San Francisco during the war years & is a large book very well illustrated.The author gave me a copy which was not returned when lent.I managed to track down another copy at quite some expense but felt better about it when the vendor told me $500 was being paid for a copy in Germany.It really is a must read for sailig ship enthusiasts. KIWI

Hi KIWI,
My ex-wife, a kiwi, was actually christened Pamir after the ship as her father sailed in her during the war.
Bob

Duncan112
31st August 2011, 19:31
Just read "Seaspray and Whisky" by Norman Freeman, a real bellylaugh of a book, a very good review of it is here....

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Seaspray-Whisky-Reminiscences-Tramp-Voyage/dp/1888173386

Although searching for the book on the Amazon site brings it up cheaper

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Seaspray-Whisky-Norman-Freeman/dp/0711035326

Strange but true - I bought a second hand copy that was in fact new when I received it (Cheapskate that I am!!)

stan mayes
31st August 2011, 20:30
Palm Oil and Small Chop -by John Goble..
I knew the author of this recently published book as a Chief Officer in Palm Line..
It is a very good read - true to life by an officer who saw many years of service
in the West African trade with various shipping companies.
All the characters you have sailed with are here..Full of interesting detail of a way of life and he has a very good way of portraying it.
Published by Whittles Publishing Ltd Dunbeath Caithness
www.whittlespublishing.com
Stan

IAN M
31st August 2011, 21:38
Anyone read LIFE ABOARD A WARTIME LIBERTY SHIP?

Alex Salmond
1st September 2011, 08:41
Guys ,
If you want to read a ripping yarn as they say and one that is also a true story you have to read "Ship of Gold n the deep blue sea"by a guy called Gary Kinder who salvages the wreck of the SS Central America its about the salvage of this ship that foundered in a Storm in 1857 or so on its way back from California with a load of miners from the Klondyke gold rush with all their booty which sank with them a great yarn and one I highly recommend (trust me),
Alex

Vic Heaney
1st September 2011, 13:10
I have just read "Trampships Tankers and Polite Conversation: Experiences of the Merchant Navy during the 1950's And 1960's" about a young lad (John Lee) going to sea in the 1950s. As I did the same thing at the same age in the same decade, I found the book wonderfully nostalgic and evocative.

But what about my own book, about an ex sea dog doing a very landlubbery thing, and all in a good cause.

Last year I walked from my home in the French Pyrenees to Blackpool. Nearly 2,000 kms. I took 70 days and arrived at the house of my birth exactly 70 years after I was born there. In total, including 2 years of training, I walked 14,500 kms, or 17.5 Million steps.

I did all this to raise funds for research into pancreatic cancer, the incurable disease from which my first wife Gaile died. I had extensive coverage in the press, on radio and on TV. The BBC TV coverage of the walk finish can be seen on YouTube - just search for "Vic's Big Walk".

Another objective was to raise awareness of this dreadful illness, which I accomplished in scores of conversations along the way, said media coverage, and in my daily blog.

Many followers of my blog urged me to write a book, which I have now done. All proceeds from the book go directly to Pancreatic Cancer UK. The book is at present in Kindle, iBook, Sony Reader and Nook formats. I hope to have a print version in about 6 months.

I find Kindle a wonderful device for tired old eyes - I am really sold on it, and I have a severe eye condition - but you don't need a Kindle to get the book. The Kindle software can be downloaded into a pc or many other electronic devices including iPhone, iPad, Android phones, then the book can be acquired from Amazon and read there.

The price of the book has been kept low - less than the price of a couple of coffees - for wide distribution and efficient fundraising. Everything you need to know is on a special page of my blog, which can be found at the web page below.

Get the book of my epic walk, relive the adventure with me, and help defeat pancreatic cancer as you read. Details here:

Ron Dean
1st September 2011, 21:23
"Trustee from the Toolroom" by Nevil Shute.
A thundering good read for boaty & engineering buffs.

Ron.

Dave Woods
1st September 2011, 22:37
I have just finished The Apprentice Who Stuttered by John Newbury. It details his life at sea from the early 60's.
I must admit that I sailed with John during the 90's and got a little mention on page 94.

Nick Batstone
3rd September 2011, 22:38
"Trustee from the Toolroom" by Nevil Shute.
A thundering good read for boaty & engineering buffs.

Ron.

Agree, in fact any Shute novel has a great story line, Requiem for a Wren and Pastoral included.

cleansweeploch
6th September 2011, 02:23
A brilliant read is The Nagle Journal, edited by John C. Dann. Published by Weidenfield & Nicolson, New York.
It's the diary of the life of Jacob Nagle from 1775-1841. Written in his own words, he was captured by the Brits in 1781 and impressed to the Navy. Sailed to 5 continents and was on the First Fleet to Australia. Almost unbelievable story but has been proved authentic. ISBN 1-55584-223-2
Also a book I picked up on the net is The History of the Liverpool Privateers and Slavers.