Narrow Dog to Carcassonne

Nick Balls
19th April 2009, 19:43
Just read this fantastic book
VERY Funny !!!
Its by Terry Darlington ......... a real seagoing (well canal then)voyage of discovery .
Recommend it highly .
Any comments ?

Nick Balls
19th April 2009, 22:01
Don't tell me nobody's read this book !

duquesa
19th April 2009, 22:24
I certainly have and the man is a genius with words. His humour is infectious. The sequel "narrow dog to Indian River" is another great read.

Nick Balls
19th April 2009, 23:05
I have yet to read "Indian River" but I must say I quite agree, it made me laugh all the way ! Brilliant

Trader
20th April 2009, 00:52
I have read it Nick and a good read it is. I love books about canal voyages. So slow and easy and yet full of misadventures if you are not careful.
I was on the London/Paris trade for years and sailed up and down the R. Seine and in that time went through the locks hundreds of times. There was no night time navigation in those days and the locks closed at 7 pm until 7 am so we had to tie up every night alongside the river bank usually close to a bar/restaurant so the pilot could have a meal and get his head down for the night.
I have just had a look on my bookshelf and found a few books you might like if you like the canals.
"Small boat through France" by Roger Pilkington
"Barging into Southern France" by Gerard Morgan-Grenville
"France- the quiet way" by John Lilley. A lovely book describing how he bought an old English barge, converted her and sailed her across the Channel to France and through all the waterways and rivers. Maps of the canals and locks etc.A good read if you are French canal freak like I am.
Alec.

John Rogers
20th April 2009, 01:22
I bet there was some good eating done in those small towns along the banks of the river. I have a cruise planned for May 2010 to cruise the Seine and visit the beaches at Normandy, a trip I have wanted to make for many years.

John.

Nick Balls
20th April 2009, 10:45
Trader,5
It reminds me of working up the Albert Canal and being astonished by the Dutch Skippers knowledge of restaurants and bars up various small cuts.
That was the proper way to live ! Shame the boats and pay were so poor!
John,6
I would recommend you read the book mentioned . In the back there are some pretty good tips on how to behave in France.When in france to as the french. In my opinion like the book it is best to wizz past the tourist spots. This sadly will include the beaches at Arromanche and the delightful port of Hornfleur on the Seine. Well worth a visit BUT please get stuck in, you only need to move "slightly sideways" to be welcomed by the real france. A fantastic country full of people who in my experience have always made me most welcome

Locking Splice
20th April 2009, 11:39
Hi Alec,

You must have the same bookshelf as me, Roger Pilkington was very good, Dover and Deal Library had a few of his for years.
Theirs a few easy going classics amongest the English canal section as well, one of the best was " Bread upon the Water" and "The quiet waters by" both written by David Blairgrove, who tried to keep cargo carrying on the canals going back in the 60's and again in the 90's. They are good reading.

Anderton for Orders and Number One by Tom Foxon are also great reads.

Working Boats by Roger Alsop is very good also. Dover Library should be able to get them all.

Hope you are keeping well.

Best Regards

Yuge

Fieldsy
20th April 2009, 13:12
Dissenting voice I'm afraid.
I read the first book and did find it very humerous at times - though he can be a little patronising about the people he meets.
Read an extract of his second book in a newspaper, and it put me right off him. He took full advantage of the hospitality of a group of Americans, then slagged them off in his book. Not a nice thing to do and I shan't be reading any more of his work.

Nick Balls
20th April 2009, 13:39
Think the "narrow dog" may have been based on another classic "Isabel and the sea " by George Miller . completely different but again I cant believe Terry Darlington had not read it before doing his book.
Funny thing Fieldsy, I had been thinking its always a mistake to read the "second book" This kind of thing is always a one off and best left at that.
Anyway it made me laugh and reminded me of my own fumbling holidays in wonderful france.

John Rogers
20th April 2009, 14:30
Nick,Thanks for the tips on touring France,I have been to France a few times when I was living in Germany and still remember a few everyday words in French. The small riverboat is named BIZET,and we will stay in Hornfleur for two days. I like to go off on my own and not follow the crowd when I visit places and thats what I plan to do when I get to the beaches.

John.

Fieldsy
20th April 2009, 14:43
Nick,Thanks for the tips on touring France,I have been to France a few times when I was living in Germany and still remember a few everyday words in French. The small riverboat is named BIZET,and we will stay in Hornfleur for two days. I like to go off on my own and not follow the crowd when I visit places and thats what I plan to do when I get to the beaches.

John.

Did you mean Honfleur? Sorry to be the pedant - been there quite a few times and it is such a lovely little harbour.

We've done the Normandy beaches quite a few times as we often holiday in the area. On one trip we'd been around the American cemetery and later spent some time on the beach further down the coast, where we saw a sign saying Dog Green sector.
Two weeks later we were at home and saw Saving Private Ryan. In the opening sequences we saw the men being slaughtered in the landing craft and on the beach, which was referred to as Dog Green sector. My wife and I sat watching with floods of tears running down our faces.

callpor
22nd October 2009, 12:14
Think the "narrow dog" may have been based on another classic "Isabel and the sea " by George Miller . completely different but again I cant believe Terry Darlington had not read it before doing his book.
Funny thing Fieldsy, I had been thinking its always a mistake to read the "second book" This kind of thing is always a one off and best left at that.
Anyway it made me laugh and reminded me of my own fumbling holidays in wonderful france.

Nick, You should read the second book "Narrow Dog to Indian River", its great. I've just finished it and could barely put it down. As with the French trip they have lots of interesting adventurers and meet some incedible people along the Intracoastal Waterway down the Eastern Seaboard of the US. As a frequent traveller to the southern States and particularly Florida I could emphasise with his comments about these characters. Was strange to hear his recent experiences of Portsmouth Marine Terninal in Virginia with the folks from ACL, as in my sailing days I was a frequent visitor and became very good friends with the operators. Brought back a lot of memories. Regards, Chris Allport

chadburn
22nd October 2009, 18:23
John go to the Mullberry Harbour Museum a great place along with the Rotunda Cinema on the cliff top nearby where they flash images of D-Day and how it looks now on a 360 degree screen, very moving. Sat in the Cafe' at Carcassonne where they handed over escaped servicemanon the escape line to the Resistance guides who took them over the top to Spain, soaked in the atmosphere, both the place the toilets apparently had not changed at all from those day's.(Jester)