Port Alfred

Bob S
27th August 2005, 18:09
Port Line’s PORT ALFRED seen in London.
Photo not dated
Built 1961
10487 grt

Tmac1720
27th August 2005, 19:02
One of H&W finest. Yard number 1630 Launched 8th September 1960 delivered 1st March 1961, 9044 tons. Sister was Port St Lawrence yard no 1631 launched 31st May 1961 delivered 20th October 1961, 9040 tons.

flyer682
28th August 2005, 05:02
A lovely shot of a classic Port Line ship.
In 1978, she was transferred to Cunard-Brocklebank and renamed MASIRAH. In 1982, she was laid up in Piraeus and sold in the middle of that year, becoming MASIR. She remained laid up in Piraeus until March 1986, when she sailed for Rotterdam to load for the Philippines. After discharging there, she went to Siracha, near Bangkok to be broken up, arriving there on 24 July 1986.

Bob S
28th August 2005, 13:42
Brilliant thing this internet. I never accociated PORT ALFRED with MASIRAH.
(Thumb)

Mick quinn
28th September 2005, 20:25
I had the good fortune to join this ship in Tokyo in Dec 1969 when she was chartered to the Crusader Shipping Line although we were all Port boat men. We had to endure(!!) sailing between Japan and New Zealand, 2 weeks on passage each way and 1 month on each coast. So So sorry to leave her after 9 glorious months, she will always be my favorite Port boat. Have a number of photos of her and other Port boats but no scanner, sorry.

doug rowland
30th September 2005, 20:02
A good ship allround,sailed in her from Liverpool toCanada/USA thence Australia/NZ back to N.America back to Australasia then NZ to Japan with what was then an
unual consignment of chilled onions to Japan. Happy days back in 1967/8.

Doug

Peter Eccleson
2nd August 2006, 12:02
Joined her in Barry drydock in '73 - sailed to Buenos Aires, loaded sugar for Basra (Iraq) then down to N Zealand for apples & butter. Up to Pitcairn (stores drop) the Philadelphia and Glasgow! What a trip. Capt was MHC Twomey RD RNR.
Good ship - great atmosphere, rubbish radio equipment! (*))

Aldinga
2nd August 2006, 12:38
A nice picture of her at the start of her career, not long out of the shipbuilders yard.

Ron

Peter Eccleson
3rd August 2006, 11:57
Ron

Good photo of her..... brings back memories. Thanks. (Applause)

Pete

EMMESSTEE
3rd August 2006, 13:39
My last ship in Port Line before coming out to Australia in 1967 - joined her in Montreal April 20th 1966 as Third Mate, left her in Liverpool June 10th 1967. She was a very nice ship - last saw her in Bass Strait in the early 1980s as "Masirah" bound from NZ to Portland, Victoria for bunkers, then on to the Black Sea with, I think I was told, frozen mutton and general. It was the Master with whom I spoke on VHF - he told me I'd have been mightily unimpressed with her condition that day!!

That was some trip you did, Pete - with Captain Michael Howard Cripps Twomey!! Only coasted with him once but I was somehow impressed with his christian names - don't know why but they've stuck with me!!

-------------
Mike.

Peter Eccleson
4th August 2006, 14:45
Mike

Had the pleasure of sailing with MHCT on ACT2 & ACT6 as well! Guess he and I were fated to sail together. was good that we got on I guess....Hmmmmm, Hmmmm

Cheers (*))

grakay
23rd October 2006, 08:18
I was a first trip Cadet on the Port Alfred along with 5 others. Dave Knight was one and I forget the rest. Frank Beer was the Mate who hated me until I did a week of watch keeping woth him, then he told me he really liked me. Then he told me he wanted me! Mmmmmmmm
We ran from Liverpool to South Africa and picked up three female stowaways in Capetown. They put on 'a show' in the Crew Bar every night, and on one occasion I was invited to join in .

And I thought every trip was going to be like that!

Chris Field
29th October 2006, 20:25
Great looking ship , typical of those lovely times - BUT have any of youse jokers ever actually been to Port Alfred after which this esteemed vessel was named?

christopher.ryan1
31st October 2006, 09:18
I was ordinary seaman on the Port Brisbane with Capt Toomey in 1972 my favorite Port Boat.Also did a run job on the Alfred. Fantastic ships.

PollY Anna
31st October 2006, 13:11
Hi Chris

Would that be the one off the St. Lawrence River. Canada With the aluminum smelter if it is. From what you guys are saying the ship was better than the Port. I expect it's changed I was there in 1965. The Port that is we know the ship has gone.

christopher.ryan1
31st October 2006, 18:30
no the run we did was just around the coast of the uk.I see you have a messsage about the Elmina Palm I was on her when we had a collision in the English Channel and got back to Breman where she was put into dry dock for major repairs.

Four Bells
10th August 2008, 00:45
MY first trip Deck Boy 68--69,9months Japan----NZ

Mike S
10th August 2008, 02:14
Two years before you get an answer Chris but yes I have been to Port Alfred. Up the Saguenay River to the paper mill to load newsprint in 1964.
That place had the most polluted water in the harbour I have ever smelt but the golf course was good.............

uisdean mor
23rd September 2008, 22:22
Sailed on PA when she was just converted to Masirsh. Perhaps not the best run - Brazil to Iraq with chicken and prawns.
However we lived in luxury - worked like hell and had probably the best times ever on the Brazilian coast. Typically Recife, Santos, Porto Alegre and top off in Rio with Itajai for the prawns. Some times we had some coffee in open stow but mostly frozen.
Freezer was Noxious - anyone remember him. All work done in the Shat Al Arab when discharging - main units, generator overhauls, winch repairs etc - everything completed in Irag typically in the river within Basra.Then on Brazilian coast it was a simple case of keeping the cargo watches going and everyone ashore on benders.Brlliant time and huge competition to win the black shield ???
Needless to say we had visitations from the beancounters and plan was to go single manned watches with dubious back up of a jury rigged alarm system. Fought it all the way but the guys basically gave in and took the easy way out and went home.
Characters I wil never forget - Wllie Horsley Junior second and Twiggy - could keeep an Allen T40 humming just by looking at it.
Went back a second time and the decay was well set in by that time. A crime really as the main machinery would have run for ever with bog standard care and attention.

Side rod counterweights were showing some signs of cracking by this time as well but they could be easily forge welded but they would not spend the money
where are they now these beancounters and what did they prove by selling our heritage.
Rgds
Uisdean

sparkie2182
23rd September 2008, 22:40
does anyone recall Captains Sinclair and Vic Hunt formerly of the Alfred?

also Cheng "Percy" Pike?

Stuart Shields
24th September 2008, 09:32
Port Alfred was my first ship, after joining her at Harland & Wolff Belfast and I sailed on her for over two years. I was aboard when she went to her name port in Canada and we were invited to a function to celebrate this. I never understood a word because the whole thing was conducted in French but the food and drink were good. Although the gate keeper at the PA docks did want to know why we were flying all the flags...he was told that some fool named the ship after this place.

Anyway, the Alfred was a good ship, as was her sister, Port St Lawrence but these days I expect ship owners would shudder when they consider the number of crew we had to keep the ships looking good.

Sadly, the Port Line is no longer with us but most of the male members of my family owe a lot to the Company that provided us with employment and training.

Now retired, after 40 years at sea, most of it with Swire Group's China Navigation Company and all I'm left with is memories.

Stuart Shields
24th September 2008, 09:35
Yes I remember both those gentlemen...I sailed with them.

rstimaru
24th September 2008, 13:56
I remember her passing us in the St Lawence river when i was on the RMS Carmania.We were homeward bound she was inward Bob

celsis
25th September 2008, 08:52
does anyone recall Captains Sinclair and Vic Hunt formerly of the Alfred?

also Cheng "Percy" Pike?


Sailed with both Vic and 'Percy' on the Nicholson, the 'St John, NB' trip! If anybody on here was on that trip, it would be great to hear from them!

When I paid off the Nich and had my leave, I joined the ACT2 and Vic was the skipper again!

Absolute gentlemen, both of them!

Shorty
3rd October 2008, 20:16
Hi,
Nice to mention Paris, a great bloke,he and I had a few things in common - one was the total dislike of the 2nd eng - R W Jackson !! I first sailed with him on the Melbourne when he was a useless J2.The last I seen of Paris was in London at a party in Earls court 1968, when he was with a big blonde aussie- girl of course, called I think Jo. His commentary of a fictional horse race used to amaze me.
Anyway I'm off to Aussie next week for a month, and who knows I may bump into him, and maybe some other Port liners !!

Regards

Shorty

sparkie2182
3rd October 2008, 23:09
i must have sailed with you Celcis..........:)

as you say, both absolute gentlemen.

Jeff. J.
4th May 2009, 15:11
Was on the PA as a deck boy/JOS/SOS on her second MANZ run between April 1963 to June 1964 away for 15 mths.
Great trip and an equally great crew only marred by my cabin mate Alan Sims [from Chartham in Kent] being drowned in Genoa Italy in the last port of call before we paid off in Glasgow.
Cheers
------
Jeff

EMMESSTEE
25th October 2009, 12:28
I remember her passing us in the St Lawence river when i was on the RMS Carmania.We were homeward bound she was inward Bob

Bob -
I wonder if the following photo link was the occasion you recall - it's a photo of "Carmania" I took from the "Alfred" in the St.Lawrence in the summer of 1966.
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/14332/ppuser/978
----------
Mike.

BAROONA
8th November 2009, 01:08
Sailed on PA when she was just converted to Masirsh. Perhaps not the best run - Brazil to Iraq with chicken and prawns.
However we lived in luxury - worked like hell and had probably the best times ever on the Brazilian coast. Typically Recife, Santos, Porto Alegre and top off in Rio with Itajai for the prawns. Some times we had some coffee in open stow but mostly frozen.
Freezer was Noxious - anyone remember him. All work done in the Shat Al Arab when discharging - main units, generator overhauls, winch repairs etc - everything completed in Irag typically in the river within Basra.Then on Brazilian coast it was a simple case of keeping the cargo watches going and everyone ashore on benders.Brlliant time and huge competition to win the black shield ???
Needless to say we had visitations from the beancounters and plan was to go single manned watches with dubious back up of a jury rigged alarm system. Fought it all the way but the guys basically gave in and took the easy way out and went home.
Characters I wil never forget - Wllie Horsley Junior second and Twiggy - could keeep an Allen T40 humming just by looking at it.
Went back a second time and the decay was well set in by that time. A crime really as the main machinery would have run for ever with bog standard care and attention.

Side rod counterweights were showing some signs of cracking by this time as well but they could be easily forge welded but they would not spend the money
where are they now these beancounters and what did they prove by selling our heritage.
Rgds
Uisdean

do you know what happened to Twiggy. Sailed with him in the PNP October 74 to March 75. I was 2/0 on the 4 to 8 and he kept the engines running below on the 4 to 8 but he would often stroll up to the bridge and help me with my chart corrections. Really liked him. He paid off with us all set to sit for His Seconds but seems to have disappeared. Hope you know something

uisdean mor
8th November 2009, 08:54
Sorry Baroona
I switched to Nigerian National after that and lost touch with most of the guys. Worked for Scottish Shipping for a while later on but never really got back to general cargo and the "interesting" runs.
Twiggy was a great bloke and a dedicated engineer but our paths never crossed again.
I do remember that the mate - Paul ? - left after a couple more runs. He had a young family and opened a pub/small hotel. The Station Hotel I think in Lymm - Cheshire. I did hear that Willie and Twiggs "assisted" the profits at the opening and may have visited a few times. Maybe worth looking up that contact if it is still there.Sorry cannot be of more help.

Rgds
Uisdean Mor

hadrianm
23rd January 2010, 14:26
I remember sailing on the last voyage as PA when we sailed to Durban for the conversion, it was a 4 month trip leaving Gibb and sailing to South America to the Gulf and back.
I have some old photos of crew I will dig them out and post them up on here

Jeff Glasser
17th May 2010, 15:25
I sailed on P.A. as Engineers steward, after joining her in New York in January 1967. My last trip to sea. We paid off in Liverpool in June '67 after a great trip. Nice ship and nice crew.

Jeff

romney01
26th February 2012, 09:38
I sailed on the Masirah early eighties, in fact I was on the voyage from New Plymouth to the Black Sea that the sparky referred to near the start of the thread. The captain he spoke to was John Oscroft I think. Lot of old Port Line guys in the engine room Willie Horsley, Chop Chop Wilson, Tim (Walter Mitty) Read was the Chief, Smoldering Bill Barlow was the lucky, I can't remember the refers name but he was a very short sighted Aussie I think we called him Mr. Magoo. I was a cadet but had the second lucky cabin. After the black sea we went to Malta for dry dock and then to Falmouth laid up next to the Chalmers and Caroline. Great ship, weeks in port the Merchant Navy was never the same again.

romney01
26th February 2012, 09:41
Just rembered Clive Sibbering replaced Willie Horsley as J2 and the fiver was Tommo.

sparkie2182
26th February 2012, 12:38
" a very short sighted Aussie I think we called him Mr. Magoo"

Don Hargreaves.

A Burnley born Australian who lived in Blackpool...........Commodore 3/Eng.

A smashing guy.

:)

barney b
26th February 2012, 13:18
And the tread keeps going. I sailed to Port Alfred in Shell Tanker Valvata,river was just starting to ice over.1968.Huge fall of snow that night of arrival. We had great snowball fights ashore with some of the locals,some great food and beers.not a bad place to be ashore.The snow made a a novelty for us after all the warm weather trips.

N.R.HOLMES
26th February 2012, 14:14
Sailed to PAlfred in the Adelaide in the very early 50 s|(51/2)i think what a dump. French speaking and not a friendly face or word all the time we were there.

romney01
12th March 2012, 09:05
I just remembered the reefer that replaced Don Hargreaves was Watty Coutes. I also remember it said in the scrap log "when I knock on the pearly gates to saint Peter I will tell - I've sailed the seas with Sharples, I've done my time in hell". I think this was a reference to the Sharples super centrifuge the purifier that threw head races at you usually at about two in the morning.

uisdean mor
12th March 2012, 13:52
#38 Romney
Yes the headraces were a danger. There was usually a long handled broom or stick pretty close to the entrance to any purifier flat with them in. This was to hit the crash button from a distance as the bits flew around.

Re the super centrifuges - they were not the only penalty - there was also the Gravitrol - mentioned on other threads - which were tempramental to slightest changes in temp and viscosity. when you had indeterminate quality of bunkers it was sheer hell trying to keep these things going against an ever lowering day tank.

Bad feelings all round regarding Sharples

Rgds
Uisdean

harryredvers
12th March 2012, 21:54
In autumn 1978 I joined her as REO in Dubai and stayed there till leaving in Jeddah in spring 1979. She was on a SAMEL/CAMEL run and Vic Hunt was old man. We left the Gulf and proceeded to Durban to drydock. At Durban the articles were to be closed. Something must have been in the wind because on the way to Durban several crewmembers wanted me to send messages about signing on again in Durban. I seem to remember I couldn't accept any messages of this nature. It's a vague memory of industrial skulduggery, of things being kept quiet from the Seamen's Union. Then we were told that the crew (not the officers) would be signed off and sent home from Durban. The London office kept up the smokescreen until - fait accompli. And that's what happened. We got to Durban and they were packed off double quick. We went into drydock and their accommodation was virtually gutted. When the toilets were converted to standing types we knew the Brocklebank crew were on the way – the Indian crew change was completed by the time we sailed for Buenos Aires. I remember somebody took an order for t-shirts ashore and I got one with 'Port Alfred, London' on the chest and 'Masirah, Liverpool' on the back. Long since lost. Whether Port Alfred or Masirah she was a nice looking ship. We were in drydock for at least a sleepless week (the sandblasting seemed continuous). Apart from Vic Hunt whom I flew home with from Jeddah) I don't seem to remember any of the mates. Ken Mackenzie is a name I seem to remember (chief engineer, but he joined later). The Chief engineer, whose name I can't remember but who was there when I joined, I do well remember for a piece of summary justice he dispensed one night. We had two Nigerian cadets, perhaps one deck and the other engineer, (part of the deal Cunard Ship Management had made with Nigerian National) and these two lads were as chalk is to cheese, as sometimes happens. The one on deck was a really pleasant kid, the other might have had PhD in obnoxiousness. This one just didn't want to be on the ship and he made several attempts to get off but could make no headway with either CSM or the Nigerians. Then he must have thought he'd cracked it when he decided to do nocturnal runs round the accommodation wearing heavy boots. I don't remember how many times he tried it, probably not three. One night he set out and 'clump, clump, clump' echoed through the accommodation, followed by 'clump, clump ... dump ... scuttle – scuttle – scuttle'. Seemingly the chief had lain in wait and then, just as the miscreant was coming abreast of his cabin door, had leaned out and smacked him one full face on. It was the last of the nocturnals. I don't remember what happened afterwards. The freezer when I joined was Len Franzen who was, I believe, Swedish . I think he'd been a RN officer during WWII. He didn't like cooked cheese, amongst other things., When he left he too was replaced by a younger bloke from Deptford who had originally joined the MN to avoid National Service. I joined with a lecce from Plymouth, or nearby, with a problem which caused them to ship him back from Cape Town on the way back to the Gulf. His replacement was from south London and he prpbably had the same problem.We had a junior engineer from Devon surname Farquhar. There was another engineer from Tyneside with his wife. Twiggy (Phil) was 3rd. They were a good bunch. The itinerary was: Dubai - Durban () - Buenos Aires - Montevideo - a river port in Brazil south of Santos and north of Rio Grande (which was our last port of call) -Cape Town - Kuwait City – Qatar (or somewhere very close to it) – Jeddah. Qatar was memorable for two things: (1) expats who came on board were clearly slates-loose, their wives were bored and virtually barricaded in; (2) an American tugboat captain who appeared in the bar high on whisky and vallium after just his boat out of Iran, just in time – that was the week Khomenai took over and the Shah got out.

uisdean mor
13th March 2012, 16:38
In autumn 1978 I joined her as REO in Dubai and stayed there till leaving in Jeddah in spring 1979. She was on a SAMEL/CAMEL run and Vic Hunt was old man. We left the Gulf and proceeded to Durban to drydock. At Durban the articles were to be closed. Something must have been in the wind because on the way to Durban several crewmembers wanted me to send messages about signing on again in Durban. I seem to remember I couldn't accept any messages of this nature. It's a vague memory of industrial skulduggery, of things being kept quiet from the Seamen's Union. Then we were told that the crew (not the officers) would be signed off and sent home from Durban. The London office kept up the smokescreen until - fait accompli. And that's what happened. We got to Durban and they were packed off double quick. We went into drydock and their accommodation was virtually gutted. When the toilets were converted to standing types we knew the Brocklebank crew were on the way – the Indian crew change was completed by the time we sailed for Buenos Aires. I remember somebody took an order for t-shirts ashore and I got one with 'Port Alfred, London' on the chest and 'Masirah, Liverpool' on the back. Long since lost. Whether Port Alfred or Masirah she was a nice looking ship. We were in drydock for at least a sleepless week (the sandblasting seemed continuous). Apart from Vic Hunt whom I flew home with from Jeddah) I don't seem to remember any of the mates. Ken Mackenzie is a name I seem to remember (chief engineer, but he joined later). The Chief engineer, whose name I can't remember but who was there when I joined, I do well remember for a piece of summary justice he dispensed one night. We had two Nigerian cadets, perhaps one deck and the other engineer, (part of the deal Cunard Ship Management had made with Nigerian National) and these two lads were as chalk is to cheese, as sometimes happens. The one on deck was a really pleasant kid, the other might have had PhD in obnoxiousness. This one just didn't want to be on the ship and he made several attempts to get off but could make no headway with either CSM or the Nigerians. Then he must have thought he'd cracked it when he decided to do nocturnal runs round the accommodation wearing heavy boots. I don't remember how many times he tried it, probably not three. One night he set out and 'clump, clump, clump' echoed through the accommodation, followed by 'clump, clump ... dump ... scuttle – scuttle – scuttle'. Seemingly the chief had lain in wait and then, just as the miscreant was coming abreast of his cabin door, had leaned out and smacked him one full face on. It was the last of the nocturnals. I don't remember what happened afterwards. The freezer when I joined was Len Franzen who was, I believe, Swedish . I think he'd been a RN officer during WWII. He didn't like cooked cheese, amongst other things., When he left he too was replaced by a younger bloke from Deptford who had originally joined the MN to avoid National Service. I joined with a lecce from Plymouth, or nearby, with a problem which caused them to ship him back from Cape Town on the way back to the Gulf. His replacement was from south London and he prpbably had the same problem.We had a junior engineer from Devon surname Farquhar. There was another engineer from Tyneside with his wife. Twiggy (Phil) was 3rd. They were a good bunch. The itinerary was: Dubai - Durban () - Buenos Aires - Montevideo - a river port in Brazil south of Santos and north of Rio Grande (which was our last port of call) -Cape Town - Kuwait City – Qatar (or somewhere very close to it) – Jeddah. Qatar was memorable for two things: (1) expats who came on board were clearly slates-loose, their wives were bored and virtually barricaded in; (2) an American tugboat captain who appeared in the bar high on whisky and vallium after just his boat out of Iran, just in time – that was the week Khomenai took over and the Shah got out.
Must have followed you round Harry (#40)
Ken MacKenzie was there when i joined ( Itajai) in Brazil. Similar run except we were going up the river to Iraq ( Basrah) Reasonably long loading times in Brazil ( Recife, Santos, Rio, Porto Allegre, Itajai). Twiggy was still there and Willie Horsley too. Black Shield was actively competed for on the coast. I left when they further educed the crewing set up - single handed watches and some jury rigged alarm system which never worked properly. basically they were running her down to her last gasp before getting rid of her. I could never understand why the guys all voted to egt off as they were basically going home to no job. I did a few more runs out to Iraq and moved over to Scottish Ship Management then. A good ship badly treated in her old age.
Rgds
Uisean

harryredvers
14th March 2012, 23:05
Thank you uisdean mor. Having looked at your profile it does seem we just missed each other, twice. First the 'Port Alfred' then the 'Oloibiri'. I could never remember the name of that river port in Brazil, of course it was Itajai. It was really good there, lots of really good South American vibes. I went to Oloibiri following Masirah, joined by launch at the the bottom of the Gulf with Brian Nuttall, master, round to Fos-sur-Mer then to Lisbon drydock (Almada) where she was got ready for Nigeria and the delta. That must be the hardship you mention. I would have gone down to Nigeria with her but I got so fed up with the situation in Lisbon that I resigned from R & E S and went free-lance eventually. Nuttall was a gentleman, I really enjoyed sailing with him. My wife joined us in Lisbon and got a six-week holiday from it, so I'm glad I didn't go to Nigeria. I'd been to Port Harcourt seventeen years earlier and understood it hadn't got better - and the crew on the Oloibiri didn't fill one with much hope either. Ken Mackenzie was a very popular chief as I remember. I think he came from Birkenhead. Twiggy was a good shipmate. I believe he had been married to a Brazilian girl and had a child, but that they both were killed in a traffic accident. Willie Horsley, the name is familiar but I can't place a face. I agree about the ship being badly treated. I'll give you an example of personal experience later. It needs to be prepared to get it right. It's a long time since.
Thanks again. What does uisdean mor mean, how is it pronounced (phonetically)?

BlueScouse
11th May 2012, 04:51
I did 4 trips in a row on the Alfred/Masirah.First joined in Jeddah,did the drydock in Durban etc.On watches all the time as had to run generator as dockyard couldn't supply enough amps, and no crew on board.
Usually joined in Brazil and left in SA 4 months later.
Have some 8mm film of the exhaust pistons going up and down. Also of the Brazilian ship we hit one time when leaving Santos.Went to bed when leaving, woke up for my watch and the ship was anchored at Hellfire Corner.Tom Swale was first trip chief for that incident.Most trips I remember the Mate was Andy Prichard.2/e Chop Chop. Twiggy and Willie Horsely only for the first trip. Bob Noxious the reefer.
I will be joining a ship next week in Spain.Run is BA,Montevideo, then Roi Grande,Paranagua,Santos and Itajai. Ship a bit bigger than the Masirah, 7500 containers.First time I will have been back to Brazil since 1980.

jjcp
23rd November 2012, 09:52
Masirah was my first ship, I joined in at Dubai 26 Nov 1979 as a Mach II. Sailed for 10 mths on the Gulf - Brazil route. This ship was quite eventful, the rescue of the 3 fishermen in the gulf waters, the rescue of the Canadian from his yacht in the south Atlantic, the ramming of the Itapura in Santos.
Julius

Peter Eccleson
24th November 2012, 02:24
What happened to the passenger accommodation, lounge and ar on the Alfred? When I said on her there was never a chance she would ever carry passengers again but the passenger accomm was kept in mothballs!

jjcp
24th November 2012, 06:47
The passenger longue was kept intact until I was on board, but I was given to understand that the Masirah had gone for some major accomodation changes (Crew).

Julius

Peter Eccleson
24th November 2012, 23:49
Thanks jjcp. Can't understand the logic of not utilising unused space onboard!

By the way, for others who knew Capt MHC Twomey, I posted a note of his death on obituaries. He had a stroke a couple of years ago in his home near Wetherby, Yorkshire. RIP

BlueScouse
15th January 2013, 02:14
Just posted a photo of Masirah entering Durban about 1979 or 80 in the gallery

BlueScouse
27th January 2013, 03:07
Just transferring my slides to computer. Here is one of the Alfred in Durban drydock.People I remember are Jim Copson, Andy Mikel, Twiggy and Willie Horsely.
Will be posting more in the gallery, or maybe in youtube or similar

saxonia
4th February 2013, 23:29
Hey BlueScouse , I bought that very same photo in Durban when I was on board as a cadet. I also bought a second photo of her about to enter the breakwater .. That brought back some memories !

dannic
21st March 2013, 20:20
Regarding the passenger accommodation - on Matangi (Port St Lawrence) it was kept unused and immaculate, even to the extent that 3rds wife, Sue Smart (Johns missis) was only allowed to use one cabin bathroom but not to leave any of her stuff in it. They were not allowed to move into a passenger cabin, even tho it was along the alleyway. Passenger lounge only used for pub lunch and movie night on Saturday. That was 1979-1980 when I was junior eng.

Dan.

school boy
25th May 2013, 03:31
I was wondering if any of the Alfred sailers remember being in port at new Plymouth new Zealand in the early seventies. when there was a visit on board from a class of school children who had a tour of the ship ending up in the dining room with ice creams all round?

Jeff Glasser
19th July 2013, 17:43
When I was on the Port Alfred Jan-June 1967 this was one of the deck boys. Anyone remember who he was?

Jeff

mr g elliott
28th July 2013, 12:20
Was on the PA as a deck boy/JOS/SOS on her second MANZ run between April 1963 to June 1964 away for 15 mths.
Great trip and an equally great crew only marred by my cabin mate Alan Sims [from Chartham in Kent] being drowned in Genoa Italy in the last port of call before we paid off in Glasgow.
Cheers
------
Jeff

my mate was on port boats you call him Richard wiseman steward do you remember him cheers gordon

Lal
5th September 2013, 03:09
Was on the PA as a deck boy/JOS/SOS on her second MANZ run between April 1963 to June 1964 away for 15 mths.
Great trip and an equally great crew only marred by my cabin mate Alan Sims [from Chartham in Kent] being drowned in Genoa Italy in the last port of call before we paid off in Glasgow.
Cheers
------
Jeff

Hi Jeff,
This is a real long-shot. I have posted a thread on this before I noticed your post.
Do you recall any of the ships itinerary/ dates from August 1963, apparently the Port Alfred went from Sydney up to Brisbane and across the Pacific, through the Panama Canal, to Kingston, Tampa and then Newport?
Thanks,
Lal.