Amazing pictures of submerged lifting vessels

gordy
8th May 2009, 15:09
One of my offshore pals sent me these, I hope the link works!

http://gallery.me.com/gordonkbickerton/100316

K urgess
8th May 2009, 15:58
An update to QuickTime is required to view.
If, like me, you don't want the update then you won't be able to view it.

Shipinfo
23rd July 2009, 11:21
You can watch or download it here: http://www.slideshare.net/guestfea295/ultra-transporteur-presentation

You would have to join to download but it's free.

salvina
23rd July 2009, 11:36
Just watched it on the link you gave Shipinfo and it is truly amazing! The navy vessel featured was that HMS Nottingham?

Shipinfo
24th July 2009, 07:36
HMS Nottingham: http://nineteenkeys.blogspot.com/2008/10/hms-nottingham-and-great-big-rock.html

Looks like a different ship but I'm no expert on navy vessels.

I always wonder how those heavy lift vessels cope with their cargo in very rough seas.

Billieboy
24th July 2009, 11:44
Magic boats, Wijsmuller should have patented the idea. When I first saw the concept on a paper napkin in '73 it was a couple of hours before I'd calculated that it would/could work. As for how they cope with the load in rough seas, the sea fastening can be built to suit the expected weather, it's also built to class requirements, to suit the underwriters of the load. The loaded voyages are, "Weather Routed", either from De Bilt or Bracknel, ships keep to the coast as much as possible, and await good weather windows for trans ocean runs.

heathenscot
24th July 2009, 12:38
Good link Shipinfo, I believe it's the USA navy destroyer "COLE" which was attacked in Aden.
Looking at those pics and the size of the load, I would imagine if that ship hit anything over a FORCE 8, she would go **** up. Then again, with new design techniques it could never happen??

bugga divino
13th August 2009, 07:14
Good link Shipinfo, I believe it's the USA navy destroyer "COLE" which was attacked in Aden.
Looking at those pics and the size of the load, I would imagine if that ship hit anything over a FORCE 8, she would go **** up. Then again, with new design techniques it could never happen??
I have sailed as a second mate and as a mate on these same ships. Wasn't there for the USS Cole voyage though. Can assure you that the seakeeping characteristics of these vessels is extremely good, even in the North Sea off Stavanger with a Force 10-11 blow, with a 100m+ structure carried on the back. But, as with anything else, when the going gets tough, you..............well, head into the wind!

O.M.Bugge
25th August 2009, 09:51
Good link Shipinfo, I believe it's the USA navy destroyer "COLE" which was attacked in Aden.
Looking at those pics and the size of the load, I would imagine if that ship hit anything over a FORCE 8, she would go **** up. Then again, with new design techniques it could never happen??
The only one that has gone belly up was MS 2. They hit a rock in Indonesia and got holed. The sister ship MS 3 is seen here sinking, but the rig she carried floated off. She is now back in service.
One of the early Superservants sunk in the Congo some years ago, also while discharging a rig.

Stability and seafastening is calculated and approved for every voyage and there is no such thing as "following the coast" from say Japan to Brazil or GOM with a 40,000 t. Production Platform on deck. (Refr. Blue Marlin in one of the pics here) The biggest problem is capabilities of some of the older J/U rigs to take the transport forces. Legs have broken off, or sustained sever damages on a few occasions.
The history of "Dry Tow" can be seen on this link: http://www.captainsvoyage-forum.com/showthread.php?t=513

Binnacle
25th August 2009, 10:09
Amazing pictures - Thank You

O.M.Bugge
25th August 2009, 10:09
I have sailed as a second mate and as a mate on these same ships. Wasn't there for the USS Cole voyage though. Can assure you that the seakeeping characteristics of these vessels is extremely good, even in the North Sea off Stavanger with a Force 10-11 blow, with a 100m+ structure carried on the back. But, as with anything else, when the going gets tough, you..............well, head into the wind!

It helps to have 50 some odd Ballast Tanks to chose from, some high and some low. Stability can be adjusted to be "comfortable" under all conditions, not to "stiff" and not too "slack".

The USS Cole was carried by the Blue Marlin when she was still under OHT management, with an all Russian crew. The Navy had forgotten to tell CIA that, so the Special Forces that came on board to protect them during the loading got a shock when the Mate got on the Tanoy and put on his most commanding voice to give some instructions to his crew, in Russian. (Maybe they didn't know the Cold War was over?)