Foggy digital camera

shamrock
16th May 2009, 17:06
Last year when out in the Far East I had real problems with my digital camera when going from the airconditioned inside of the ship to the humid & hot outside.

Taking photo's of the ports and general sea views wasn't so bad but if something came close without notice...such as another ship or wildlife...the camera fogged right up as soon as I stepped out onto the deck and wouldn't clear sufficiently for around 10 minutes, thus missing whatever it was that I wanted to photograph :rolleyes:

So has anyone got any die-hard tips to offer on how to avoid it, cure it or anything remotely helpful so that when I am out in the Far/Middle East next year I can whip out the camera without having to give it advance notice and take photo's without the fog, please?

benjidog
16th May 2009, 17:20
I think you are up against the laws of physics here - unlike human laws they are difficult to break. :)

I had the same problem when I was working in Muscat a couple of years ago. Not just the camera but my glasses as well! As soon as you came out of the air-conditioned environment that was it - couldn't see a damn thing.

What you also have to watch for is getting condensation in the camera's works if you take a cold camera into a warm humid atmosphere. I used to keep the camera in a plastic bag and only took it out after it had acclimatised for a while. Doesn't help your need for instant availability though!

MARINEJOCKY
16th May 2009, 17:49
Buy 2 cameras, one for inside & one for outside. Joking.

I have the same problem in Florida and as soon as I arrive at an outside location I place the camera in the open and leave it out there as long as I am at that location or onboard that yacht.

I have never had moisture problems in the inside of a camera but I do tend to renew (up-grade) a camera about once every 12 to 18 months.

John Rogers
16th May 2009, 18:21
How about using one of the small underwater packs they use when SCUBA diving.

John

MARINEJOCKY
16th May 2009, 18:32
Would they use the old trick of spitting inside to stop it misting up, so much for mega pixels then.

Steve
16th May 2009, 19:22
Try here http://www.worldphotographyforum.com/ But please dont add that Humungus signature.

shamrock
16th May 2009, 19:44
Thinking I might revert back to my old Canon EOS 35mm instead....apart from the fact that it had a saltwater shower when rounding Cape Horn in 2005....I didn't see the damn great wave creeping up behind me as I took a photo of the rocks....I felt the damn great wave though when it landed on me...pretty chilly to say the least. The two French passengers couldn't stop laughing :rolleyes:

Steve Woodward
16th May 2009, 21:08
Try keeping your camera ( in it's bag) in a porthole box - they are generally warmer

R58484956
17th May 2009, 10:46
In the far east, carried camera in a cool bag, when wanting to photograph take camera out of bag very quickly,take photo and pop camera back in bag quickly. When the camera got to know the routine it some times beat me to it and fogged up.

shamrock
17th May 2009, 11:12
In the far east, carried camera in a cool bag, when wanting to photograph take camera out of bag very quickly,take photo and pop camera back in bag quickly. When the camera got to know the routine it some times beat me to it and fogged up.

LOL...don't ya just love it when technology thinks it knows more than you do? :)

Just like my laptop....erm..nah...best not go there it might get offended and chuck a wobbly (EEK)

steviej
18th May 2009, 16:38
If you are using a camera that is non-telescopic, fit a lens filter. You can wipe the condensation off the filter with a tissue without damaging the lens