Death of a GP1

Dickyboy
3rd June 2009, 10:26
Anyone remember the death of a GP1, I think on the Security in 1971.
He was painting from a bosun's chair at the top of the engine room, the gantline parted and he fell to the bottom plates. He died a couple of minutes later, and was buried in Lobito.
I do recall his name but am unsure whether to post it here.
He was ex engine room, and it was his first trip as GP1
I remember him quite well, even though he was only with us for a week or two. I recall he was bricking it while steering the ship for the first couple of times. Mind you, he was steering it up and down the Congo to and from Ango Ango.

Nick Balls
3rd June 2009, 11:18
Tragic. This post sums up the life at sea. We remember "old wots his name" that did so and so.........back in ..........
People ashore would never understand . Im sure the fact Dickyboy remembers after all these years so to will the relatives of GP1
Merchant Navy ...MN ....upside down thats NW ...... Forgotten and (N) Not (W) Wanted!!! Apart from this site of course!!!!!

Dickyboy
3rd June 2009, 14:08
Tragic. This post sums up the life at sea. We remember "old wots his name" that did so and so.........back in ..........
People ashore would never understand . Im sure the fact Dickyboy remembers after all these years so to will the relatives of GP1
Merchant Navy ...MN ....upside down thats NW ...... Forgotten and (N) Not (W) Wanted!!! Apart from this site of course!!!!!

I remember very few of the people I sailed with by name. Their faces and the events on the ships are still very clear though. We were more than Board of Trade Acquaintances, many I sailed with several times over the years, but I never became long term friends with anyone. Never maintained contact when on leave, or when I swallowed the anchor. On the other hand I don't recall anyone that I actively disliked either. I'm sure I would remember them if there were any.

Rob.Norrie
10th June 2009, 10:19
Yes Dickboy,
I agree in your thoughts,I sailed many years in BP, lots good crowds on the ships, sailed with many time and time again. Then it came to an end,and sorry that lost all contact with these good mates and friends, not any that I can recall as bad.
I always thought the lads in the GP system were great bunch, I don,t think BP apprecieted sometimes the work they done.
Great times to remember back on now, never regret my life at sea, and would do the same again. People ashore could not understand this. Yes I say people ashore, they have no idea of life on ships.
I sailed on the Security two years, she was new at the time, one year Lagos-Okrika back and forward 18 hours between the two berth.
She was nice ship then, done her first d/dock in Gothenborg, one month in an small hotel, but the beer was so expensive.....in this time.
Some thoughts run throuh your head.
Regards Rob

ROBERT HENDERSON
10th June 2009, 10:49
I saoled in Everard tankers as 2nd Mate, mate and relief master with Everard tankers in the 50s and 60s. Similarly to many others I only remember one or two names from all my seagoing days.
One stands out for me, while my regular ship was in drydock I was sent to the Marquis as an emergency fromm Blyth to Par. I remember the master was Tommy Allen as everytime I came on watch the charts were put away, Tommy sailed by knowledge of the coast and never used a chart.
Sadly Tommy was on another cargo vessel in Great Yarmouth, the mate and two sailors went for a lunch time drink, Tommy decided single handed to get the ship ready for sea. While dropping a derrick, instead of stretching the topping lift along the deck Tommy laeft it in a coil, a turn caught caught around his leg, sheared his leg off at the top block annd dropped Tommy against the bulwarks, when the crew returned they found Tommy already dead. Everards paid his widow an ex gratia payment as the insurance argued that officers were in a supervisory capacity and should not actually lowere derricks etc themselves.

Regards Robert

Dickyboy
10th June 2009, 11:22
Yes Dickboy,
I agree in your thoughts,I sailed many years in BP, lots good crowds on the ships, sailed with many time and time again. Then it came to an end,and sorry that lost all contact with these good mates and friends, not any that I can recall as bad.
I always thought the lads in the GP system were great bunch, I don,t think BP apprecieted sometimes the work they done.
Great times to remember back on now, never regret my life at sea, and would do the same again. People ashore could not understand this. Yes I say people ashore, they have no idea of life on ships.
I sailed on the Security two years, she was new at the time, one year Lagos-Okrika back and forward 18 hours between the two berth.
She was nice ship then, done her first d/dock in Gothenborg, one month in an small hotel, but the beer was so expensive.....in this time.
Some thoughts run throuh your head.
Regards Rob
Yeah, some great times indeed Rob, looking back, even the Lagos - Okrika run had it's good moments :o) There is a thread on the Lagos - Okrika run if you haven't found it all ready.

Dickyboy
10th June 2009, 12:00
Robert H
Jeez! Thats aweful.
It's typical of the actions of a good seafarer, and also typical of office wallahs in insurance companies.
I, personally think that the insurance company was wrong.
Any officer should and could do any job that was expected by him, to be done by those under him. That's what cadetships and training were for. As far as I know any officer should have all the tickets pertaining to his department up to the level he was working at. So Captains should have, at some point, taken every ticket, including the lower ones like Steering, Lifeboat and EDH.
Tommy Allen would have been certificated to do the job he was doing, wether he should have been doing it alone is another matter of course.
To say that "Officers were in a supervisory capacity" Is a load of old B*ll*cks. Nothing much would have ever got done if officers didn't do physical work as well as supervising others.
I'm going to try and attach a pic' of one of Freds current tankers. Seen by me a few years afo on the Solent. Audacity I think...