Market Diner/Red Ensign Club

Dickyboy
4th June 2009, 12:10
Anyone remember the Market Diner and the Red Ensign Club, just under the evilated roadway opposite Pier 92?

K urgess
4th June 2009, 12:16
If you search the forums using the words market diner you'll find a lot of references.
Cheers
Kris

R58484956
4th June 2009, 14:01
Yes remember the market diner well. I believe now gone.

Dickyboy
4th June 2009, 14:59
If you search the forums using the words market diner you'll find a lot of references.
Cheers
Kris
Thanks for that, Cheers!

peter johnston
8th July 2009, 23:21
Happy to say ,the Market Diner is still there ...boarded up after a great fire in the kitchen,which spread through the length of the diner...next to the diner is now a stable for sightseeing horses ,and around the corner,which housed the wardroom downstairs,is now a cleaning store for the stables....however..on the other corner 49th &12th ,the red ensign club is no longer there,the whole block has been re-developed,sad to say...but on a brighter note..the Anchor Bar opposite pier 88 Greek Line is still open ,with some beautiful fotos of the ships that we all saw at berth...long live the memories. thanks peter jonno johnston

ferrandou
9th July 2009, 00:11
Market Diner and Wardroom, now I remember, parties up-town , cargo ship Saxonia, onetime cops came flying down street and bundled us into squad car, we were sitting on brownstone steps having craic and beer with black guys.
Paranoid Cops cannot mix with Paddys .

No danger

Bob Holis

Dickyboy
9th July 2009, 11:43
Happy to say ,the Market Diner is still there ...boarded up after a great fire in the kitchen,which spread through the length of the diner...next to the diner is now a stable for sightseeing horses ,and around the corner,which housed the wardroom downstairs,is now a cleaning store for the stables....however..on the other corner 49th &12th ,the red ensign club is no longer there,the whole block has been re-developed,sad to say...but on a brighter note..the Anchor Bar opposite pier 88 Greek Line is still open ,with some beautiful fotos of the ships that we all saw at berth...long live the memories. thanks peter jonno johnston

I remember the Market Diner area well, was the "Wardroom" the night club, just around the corner, to the left of the M D? I never went in there, I was only 17 ish, but did drink in the M D and the Red Ensign Club. 21 was the age to legally drink in NY as I recall. There was a really nice bloke who managed the Red Ensign Club, very popular as I recall, but he got the bullet for fiddling.
That was the place I first saw Colour Television, "The Avengers"
I recall a small open fronted shop, next door to the M D that sold second hand comics. All the old Superman, Silver Surfer, Batman etc etc. They used to sell HUGE boxes of Dhobi Dust, and HUGE bottles of Coke in there as well. It was a very popular place with us boy ratings. I was a Bridge Boy on the Queen Mary at the time.
The Red Ensign Club was a very good place to get a decent meal, at a reasonable price. Plenty of Burgers, Hash, and fries. Ideal for us boys. :o)
Happy days!

peter johnston
16th July 2009, 00:45
yep! you are so right! on entering the red ensign there was a bank of 5 phone booths with the snack bar on the left...straight ahead was a reading room to the right.and and further ahead was the games room..and tv..opposite the snack bar..was a staircase up to the tv room...and the dance hall bar..with the dance hall looking out on to 49th street...we had some very good nights in port there...with english nannies working in the city ,coming down for the night dances ,when the english ships came in! great memories!

Dickyboy
20th July 2009, 20:28
Peter
You described it just as I remembered it. I don't recall any dances whenever I was there though. I was often "Up Town" exploring Broadway and 42nd st, or going up the Empire State Building.
I had the "Job" of taking a "Sea Cadet" ashore in NY every time we were in there on the Franconia. We used to have one on every trip from Bermuda. Just to show them what life was like at sea. They loved it! :o
That was in 1967

johnb42
20th July 2009, 21:06
And here was me thinking you meant the Red Ensign Club in Dock Street, London. Certainly remember that place.

Pilot mac
21st July 2009, 15:18
Red Ensign in Dock Street, now your talking! Whilst taking second mates the lads staying in The Red Ensign went down with serious food poisoning. Happy days!

Dave

FrankGil
21st July 2009, 15:47
I remember it well,I was on the Queen of Bermuda in 1960,docked at Pier 95,I think it was very popular with the Cunard lads.

Dickyboy
21st July 2009, 16:07
Red Ensign in Dock Street, now your talking! Whilst taking second mates the lads staying in The Red Ensign went down with serious food poisoning. Happy days!

Dave
I stayed in that place for one night. Put there by BP. Complained to them like mad. We were company men, and flying out to join my first GP ship the following day.
It was nothing but a Doss House. I don't think they had many seafarers staying there by that time. That would have been in the late 60s

Cutsplice
21st July 2009, 16:45
What about Bernards the shop near the Diner a Greek guy owned it lots of wranglers, lee riders etc. Barmen in the Diner early sixties Andy,Danny and Jim from Ireland cant remember the rest. There was number of Diners around NY all owned by Zefflin Bros or similar name. I never liked the place only called in when there were no passenger ships in, which was rare then.
Greenwich Village was better more bars and a better mix of weirdos than the Diner, certainly more females in the Village although some were certainly a little strange.

Pat Kennedy
21st July 2009, 16:58
Cutsplice,
I do remember the Irish barman named Jimmy, he was from Belfast, and was a good guy, he used to let us run up a tab and always gave us loads of chips and pretzels.
I bought a US Marine Corps signet ring in that shop you mention for a couple of bucks. some years later it paid for one the best nights I've ever had in my life, in Gydinia, about a million Zlotys worth!
Pat

Dickyboy
22nd July 2009, 17:19
What about Bernards the shop near the Diner a Greek guy owned it lots of wranglers, lee riders etc. Barmen in the Diner early sixties Andy,Danny and Jim from Ireland cant remember the rest. There was number of Diners around NY all owned by Zefflin Bros or similar name. I never liked the place only called in when there were no passenger ships in, which was rare then.
Greenwich Village was better more bars and a better mix of weirdos than the Diner, certainly more females in the Village although some were certainly a little strange.
Cutsplice
I said earlier on this thread that us boys used to buy Huge bottles of Coke and Huge boxes of Dhobi dust in the secondhand comic shop. I'm wondering if I was in error. Would it have been Bernard's that we bought those items in?
The Coke came in a traditional shaped bottle, but was of a 2litre, or 2pint size, with a crown top. Once opened it just had to be drunk.

Cutsplice
22nd July 2009, 20:50
I remember that shop you are refering to, used to have the News of the World an airmail edition, owned/run by a Cockney guy slim, olive skinned. The guy I am thinking of someone told me, he was shot and killed during a holdup in his shop true or otherwise I really dont know. I cant remember Benards selling anything other than clothes and clothes related items.

Dickyboy
22nd July 2009, 23:09
Plenty of murders in NY. I was on the Franconia 1967. Todds Shipyard, in Brooklyn I think. We were having our rudder repaired, it developed a leak or something. 7 murders there in the 7 days we were there. We were warned against going ashore there, but we did anyway.
The Comic Shop was open fronted as I recall, just a counter with the bloke standing behind it. A sitting target for a robber.

peter johnston
26th July 2009, 23:40
yeppers ! it was bernards shop..they sold all toiletries,denim jeans ,shoes and what not....and yes he was shot in a hold up ,and they closed the shop for some time...but there was also anothe shop next door which sold ties,brollies ,cufflinks (wrap around the cuffs) with colored stones in them..and all sorts of magazines.....and i was also on the Franconia ,while berthed in "Todds Shipyard " having our cracked rudder repaired...dickyboy and his gang were painting and deck maintenance,whilst we were scrubbing the inner decks and stairways! bloody good times ....peter

Dickyboy
28th July 2009, 08:45
I had mixed feelings about New York. The approach under the Verrazano Bridge, (still being built in 64, completed by the time I was on the Franc') was amazing, an of course the skyline. But the city itself I found dirty, noisy and dangerous. The skyscrapers were the most intresting aspect of the city, but at street level I didn't really like it much. Bermuda was much more my cup of tea, though I did get into some quite serious trouble with the police there. After having had too much to drink one time.
N Y wasn't as I expected it to be, as shown on TV, and Brooklyn really was a dump.
The biggest thing about N Y was GOING to N Y.

Cutsplice
28th July 2009, 11:46
The Verrazano Narrows Bridge in Aug 63 was under construction with both pillars in situ and span wires also in situ, the down wires were being put in place. The sections were then brought by barge each section @170 tons as we traded into NY for 11 months every 2 weeks by July 64 the bridge was open to traffic. According to our pilots there was only one fatality during its construction, a record then for a bridge of its size. When passing beneath it we were advised to have our decks clear of crew as it was known that the workers sometimes tried to drop things on to passing vessels, trying to drop them into the funnel. We never experienced any objects dropping onto our vessel. It was proposed to name the bridge the John F Kennedy Bridge shortly after his assasination, but the feeling was that naming the airport from Idlewell to JFK was sufficent so the original proposed name was kept.
Sorry for straying from the Market Diner, hope my apology satisfies the moderators.

Pat Kennedy
28th July 2009, 12:58
Ciutsplice,
I took a photo of the bridge from the Ivernia when we were leaving NY one trip in 1964. The bridge was nearing completion but you could see the construction workers moving about up there.
The pic is here;
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/146749/ppuser/12939

simansoza66
28th July 2009, 13:25
Bernard's was owned by a Bernard Groman, seems to have been known as Bernards clothing store around 1961.I know he died in 1972, was this the time of the incident? If it was in the 60s then it is someone else.
The year is important.Thanks for any help from your memories.

dmor319
28th July 2009, 14:25
Also do not forget Max Hahns the clothing store to Cunard sailors. It closed when the ships sailed. It was where the Pea Coats was bought fo $10 back in the sixties. Max was murdered in his store when we arrived one Saturday in the late sixties.
Regards
Dave Morris Vindi 60

Dickyboy
28th July 2009, 17:01
Ciutsplice,
I took a photo of the bridge from the Ivernia when we were leaving NY one trip in 1964. The bridge was nearing completion but you could see the construction workers moving about up there.
The pic is here;
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/146749/ppuser/12939
I remember being a Bridge Boy on the Queen Mary, and seeing the N Y skyline framed under the bridge, to the right, the Hudson ahead and the New Jersey/Statten Island shoreline, with many USN ships laid up there, and the smell of the Maxwell House coffee factory wafting across the harbour, also remembering how small the Statue Of Libery looked.
A shame about Bernard, I don't recall him, but it's nice to know he is well remembered.

Pat Kennedy
28th July 2009, 20:32
Dickyboy,
We used to tie up across the dock from the Mary, and gaze at her with awe and wonder as she sailed, and then head up to the Diner confident that at last we'd have a bit of space to drink in peace now all the mushes had gone away
Regards,
Pat(K)

Cutsplice
28th July 2009, 21:40
Dave, it was max I was referring to who was shot during a robbery, I think some confused that with Bernard, I hope Bernard did not meet the same end but in NY at that era anything was possible. I remember the Pea jackets well they had a great collar on them, cant recall the price. The genuine Parkas were the real deal a little dearer than the Pea jackets but they were warm had a couple one for lookout and another for going ashore came in handy during the winter on the US coast.

peter johnston
29th July 2009, 01:36
yess! there was a hold up and shooting and he was murdered ! keep these facts coming..anyone remember buying the one dollar shirts from the chinese laundry? peter

peter johnston
30th July 2009, 23:50
hi guys....i was informed last night from a lady freind who lived in brooklyn and used to come down to pier 92 to meet her boyfreind from the Sylvania..that the robbery was in fact the second block down from max's shop..and it remained closed for some time..just along from the Anchor bar! the plot thickens huh!

tom roberts
31st July 2009, 21:58
Ah the diner one of its more interesting characters was Cadillac Kate in the late 50s, there was a barman from Liverpool who I last saw running a kiosk in I think Water st Liverpool early 90s used to have a few beers there and go up town to the Metropole bar and watch the jazz band Cosy Cole was the resident drummer good music but the beer was dear nursed a bottle till it was too warm almost to drink then back to the Diner for 15cent beer and a bowl of thick(soup) to the uninitiated,happy days.

Pat Kennedy
1st August 2009, 21:42
Nearby was the Salvation Army depot where you could buy those big fridges really cheap,and take them back home to sell for a tidy profit. Sometimes the ship's electrician could be prevailed upon to convert them to UK voltage.
My favourite boozer in NY was 'His Father's Moustache' in Greenwich Village. Anyone remember this?
Pat

Dickyboy
2nd August 2009, 09:49
Dickyboy,
We used to tie up across the dock from the Mary, and gaze at her with awe and wonder as she sailed, and then head up to the Diner confident that at last we'd have a bit of space to drink in peace now all the mushes had gone away
Regards,
Pat(K)
What ship were you on Pat?
Must have been a great relief to see all those "Pazzie Boat Men" sail away....... until next week :o
Happy Daze

Pat Kennedy
2nd August 2009, 10:39
What ship were you on Pat?
Must have been a great relief to see all those "Pazzie Boat Men" sail away....... until next week :o
Happy Daze

Dickyboy,
I was in that Ivernia, the cargo ship, not the pazzie boat!
Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

Dickyboy
2nd August 2009, 13:54
One of the "Whisky Boats" wasn't she? Whisky from Glasgow & Gin etc from London?
Frequently ran over to Canadia (Where Canadians come from :o ) If I recall correctly.

Pat Kennedy
2nd August 2009, 14:12
Dickyboy,
No she was on the Liverpool to New York run with general cargo in both directions. The best ship I was ever in.
The Whisky boats were Alaunia, Andania etc. My brother was an engineer on the Andania.
Regards,
Pat

Cutsplice
2nd August 2009, 15:53
When I was on the Ivernia she carried some whisky not a lot of it, only remember Bushmills Irish Whiskey I seem to recall it was black label. Other items were KitKat chocolate, Hush Puppy shoes suede ones, lots of Ronson Variflame gas lighters, parcel mail rest was big stuff.
Around the corner from the Diner and Bernards was a bar downstairs, sort of club, cant recall the name but Charlies Hideaway seems to ring a bell. Also cant recall whether Bernards Store was next to the diner or if there was something else in between. Anyone been to Jack Dempseys bar I was in there and Jack was there and I could have had a photo taken with him for $1.50 I declined as I thougt it was too dear. Sadly a few years later I met a guy in Liverpool an old boxer who had sparred with Jack and had photos of the two of them sparring in a gym. How I regretted not spending the $1.50 it would have been invaluable being able to show this guy a more recent photo of Jack and myself. Jack Dempseys bar was a throwback to the thirties just lacked the drinkers with big hats and wide lapels and double breasted suits.
I suppose I had too much testosterone in them days causing me to lose out on what then seemed to have little value, but as the tetosterone subsides one then sees that those unimportant things of yesteryear are now priceless.

Pat Kennedy
2nd August 2009, 17:05
When I was in the Ivernia, we always got the day off on the Sunday, (we always arrived on Saturday afternoon) so we used to head off to Coney Island for the day which was a great experience, and once we all traipsed off to Flushing Meadow to the World's Fair.
In the evening there would be a dance at the Red Ensign Club, and a lot of the girls there would be Brits; nannies and so on who wanted to connect with someone from home.
One trip, we met three of them who actually had had enough of the USA and were desperate to get back to Blighty.
They were smuggled aboard and settled down in the sailor's rec room, which as Cutsplice can confirm, was never used.The cook was recruited into the plot, and the stowaways were very well fed and watered all the way back to Liverpool, where they were smuggled ashore after dark, put in a taxi, and sent on their way to Lime St Station.
To the best of my knowledge, these three girls were treated with great respect by all hands.
Pat(Thumb)

peter johnston
2nd August 2009, 20:36
hello cutsplice! just around the corner from the diner and on 50th street opposite clinton park .was the downstairs bar called the "Wardroom" it was origionally for french line ships officers..and had a terrific oil painting on the far wall of "SS France" i wondered what ever happened to that painting..and jack dempseys bar was great! it murals of boxers on the wall ,with a sunken bar in the middle....i still have some swizzle sticks from his bar..and was lucky enough to see him too! regards

Cutsplice
2nd August 2009, 21:20
Pat, we had 3 female stowaways from Belfast on the Ivernia, it was the Christmas trip and an AB put in a sick note prior to departing L,pool. His cabin was vacant for the trip they were hidden in there with the deadlight down, it got a little ripe they sprayed perfume about and was detected in the alleyway. The Bosuns cabin was in the cross alleway directly facing down into our alleyway, he sat is his chair all day with his door open watching and waiting. It paid off as one of them emerged to go to the bathroom, he pounced and took them to the Old Man, they were then billeted in the hospital (2) and (1) in a spare apprentices cabin. They slept during the day and cmae into our acomodation at night, they were supposed to dine in the Saloon but they declined the honour. On arrival in L,pool about 0830 one of their fathers collected them and off they went, I believe they were billed something like 70 for the fare.
When I went into Ma Edgertons pub in Casey St at about noon that day, the barmaid challenged me as to what we were up to on the Ivernia. She presented me with a photo and a column in the Daily Express on an inside page with the details. how the paper got the photo and details prior to us arriving is a mystery, must have been from the families of the stowaways.
Was Ernie the cook when you had the stowaways, I think he would take some convincing to join the plot, I would think its almost impossible, he was a Cunard man through and through, what about The Angry Grocer the 2nd Steward was he in on the plot.
Thanks Peter for The Wardroom now I remember, but it leaves Charlies Hideaway to deal with now, as one mystery is solved another appears.

Pat Kennedy
2nd August 2009, 21:51
Cutsplice,
The cook was in on it, but I believe that some coercion was used. The exact details of this I was not privy to, but Matty Grey, who could charm the knickers off a nun was the leading light in all of this.
The Lampy suspected something, but he too was leaned on and kept his gob shut.
Pat

olddog96
8th August 2009, 05:16
The market diner was the down fall for me while on fire watch (Mauretania Sept.59). Very lucky not to end up with DR. but did recieve " dont come Monday " after arriving back in Southampton......Vern

Dickyboy
2nd September 2009, 06:48
The Market Diner, and the Red Ensign Club were a bit too handy, being so close to the ships wern't they? So easy to just nip across the road for a "Quick One" or two or three :o

simansoza66
8th August 2010, 15:09
Nearly a year later! A NY Times article from Jan. 1969 interviews, briefly, Mrs Bernard Groman, and has a photo of Max Hahn sign on the store front, the other front advertises arrow shirts and then the diner.Headline for the article is Luxury liner row and winds of austerity, if you search it. There are 2 other photos., one is a sailor and probably Michael Leonard.One of the Zelin's from the market or munsun diners is interviewed and quoted.
Bernard's began in 1953-54 and was at 716 12th Avenue, corner of W52nd St NYC., in the article.
There was a sign in French, about the sea, in the window.It was described as a haberdashery selling clothes, childrens clothes, clothes for waiters.Samaritain was mentioned, as well.

callpor
8th August 2010, 22:11
All these posts rang some bells from times gone by. I was 3/0 on both Alaunia and Andania in 1967-69 running into Pier 32 on the west side. Our frequent haunt was the Market Diner on West and Canal Street. Running a search I find it has somewhat changed. http://www.forgotten-ny.com/STREET%20SCENES/west.street.story/westside.html .
Even you guys off the Queens with memorieis of Piers 52/54 should take a look at some of the content - it will bring back some memories of how it was.
Chris Allport

kauvaka
9th August 2010, 06:02
I remember the Market Diner and the jeans shops from the QM in 1959 but being an 18 year old and looking it stuck to the Pig and Whistle for drinking. Was having a wander through New York one day when I noticed a lot of people lining the pavement (sidewalk) and cops on every intersection. Down the middle of the road came a procession of khaki jeeps occupied by bearded guys in khaki denim uniforms. The crowds were cheering and the skies were raining shredded paper. Asked a cop who they were and he thought I was taking the p*ss. It was Fidel Castro and his merry men receiving a ticker tape parade. It wasn't too long later that the Americans would have been throwing more than paper at him. In later years I shipped out with shipmates who had been on the sugar run to Cuba and they were often of the opinion that Castro had cleaned up what was a corrupt, poverty stricken country run by mafia casino operators. Must do a site search to see if there are any posts relating to pre Castro Cuba.

Robinj
12th August 2010, 12:11
Nearby was the Salvation Army depot where you could buy those big fridges really cheap,and take them back home to sell for a tidy profit. Sometimes the ship's electrician could be prevailed upon to convert them to UK voltage.
My favourite boozer in NY was 'His Father's Moustache' in Greenwich Village. Anyone remember this?
Pat

Remember it well. We berthed at the bottom of James Street on the edge of the Village (can't remember the pier number, Cunard used the same berth). Always went uptown first ten on to His Fathers Moustache. Beer served in jugs and peanut shells all over thefloor with Dixieland Jazz playing. Great times had by all.

gwzm
12th August 2010, 21:57
My Father's Mustache (sic) Club was a great hoot - beer in schooners, dixieland jazz band and those cardboard moustaches.............
On a related note, does anyone recall Agnes Muirhead's Mission for Seamen aka Aggie's Mish. I seem to remember that we went in through the front door of some posh hotel then out the back entrance into an alley and then into the mission?
Also the YMCA for a swim and then a deli for a sandwich and a carton of ice cream for afters.

Happy days,

gwzm

terence
12th August 2010, 23:43
think there was a y m c a as well
terry music man
ps good posts

kingorry
14th August 2010, 09:33
Hi : I remember the Market Diner and the Ward Room well. On my first trip to New York as a purser's clerk on the Queen Elizabeth in 1962, I remember being warned against going to the Market Diner alone, by one of the lady-assistant-pursers, one rather motherly Elizabeth Sayers, I seem to recall. However I survived and had many a good meal there - a relief from the rather boring food on the QE. Also spent many a happy evening in the Ward Room - just round the corner from the Market Diner, on West 54th Street. Happy days!!!
Does anyone actually have a photo of the Market Diner as it was in the early 1960s? I would love to see one!
John Shepherd

peter johnston
17th October 2010, 01:50
hello john!
sadly to say on our part as having great merchant seamen memories.,,the market diner as we knew it has now been taken over...wait for it.!..it has now become .."Larry Flints cocktail and strip club".....it has incorperated the whole market diner block! as you probably know ,the elevated highway has now been long gone ..and the area does look upmarket...and the Queens now berthing in brooklyn...would never have that fantastic view of manhattan as we did .at Pier 92..and also the lower Cunard piers of manhattan..i think we should be so lucky to have memories of Ships and the hustle &bustle that they brought to the Manhattan Piers....we are so lucky..life to a foreign port was an adventure covering thousands of miles and the memories we keep ....Manhattan luxury liner Row..is now a memory..enjoy it ,and pass the story to our grandsons and grandsaughters..

ALAN TYLER
17th October 2010, 13:26
I remember the Market Diner well, also going up to the "blood bank" (was it St Catherines?) for more "beer" tokens. Another happy watering hole was "Joe Beefs" in Montreal. Happy days.

Pat Kennedy
17th October 2010, 14:54
I remember the Market Diner well, also going up to the "blood bank" (was it St Catherines?) for more "beer" tokens. Another happy watering hole was "Joe Beefs" in Montreal. Happy days.

There were two bloodbanks adjacent to each other in 42nd st.
You were not supposed to sell blood to both on the same day, but this rule was often flouted.
One of the stewards on the Ivernia had type O negative blood which was in high demand and attracted a better price than other blood groups, so this poor guy was often cajoled into selling a pint or two in order to fund a night on the town for his colleagues.
Regards.
Pat(Thumb)

peter johnston
20th October 2010, 00:23
Hi : I remember the Market Diner and the Ward Room well. On my first trip to New York as a purser's clerk on the Queen Elizabeth in 1962, I remember being warned against going to the Market Diner alone, by one of the lady-assistant-pursers, one rather motherly Elizabeth Sayers, I seem to recall. However I survived and had many a good meal there - a relief from the rather boring food on the QE. Also spent many a happy evening in the Ward Room - just round the corner from the Market Diner, on West 54th Street. Happy days!!!
Does anyone actually have a photo of the Market Diner as it was in the early 1960s? I would love to see one!
John Shepherd

john! have replied to your message,hope you got it!

alan ward
20th October 2011, 09:56
yeppers ! it was bernards shop..they sold all toiletries,denim jeans ,shoes and what not....and yes he was shot in a hold up ,and they closed the shop for some time...but there was also anothe shop next door which sold ties,brollies ,cufflinks (wrap around the cuffs) with colored stones in them..and all sorts of magazines.....and i was also on the Franconia ,while berthed in "Todds Shipyard " having our cracked rudder repaired...dickyboy and his gang were painting and deck maintenance,whilst we were scrubbing the inner decks and stairways! bloody good times ....peter

I found some of those cufflinks in a local charity shop recently and bought them out of nostalgia never meaning to wear them as they are so tacky now.Couldn`t find my normal cufflinks for a night out so put the old ones in,everyone remarked on them they were so retro,you see we did have good taste!

tom roberts
20th October 2011, 13:13
When I was in New York the Red Ensign club was run by a lady I believe she was originally from Liverpool a Mrs Hardy? her daughter was married to Richard Egan a film star how true this is I dont know ,anyone can enlightnen me?My daughter and son in law wanted to send my wife and I to New York this year as a Xmas present they say the place has changed so much I wouldnt recognise it but when the insurance came to almst a thousand pounds due to a recent opperation for a heart by pass no way will I pay that even to visit a city I loven so much back in the 50s and 60s I have posted a previous reply to this thread regarding some of the charecters in the Diner can anyone recall others ?.