Jumping ships

paul0510
15th June 2009, 15:38
is a new book out by a bloke named David Baboulene an ex-NavApp. Anybody read it yet? May get it this week anyway.

Duncan112
16th June 2009, 07:44
See http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=25784

A cracking read, as is his other book!!

Windy
25th June 2009, 13:26
Hey Paul,

In case you are concerned about parting with the money, I can absolutely and utterly assure you that David Baboulene's new book, Jumping Ships, is damn excellent. Hilarious. Worth every penny. Don't wait another moment.

And his first one was top notch too. You should buy both. They also make great presents.

Hope this helps.

Best regards.

David Baboulene

paul0510
25th June 2009, 22:12
Windy, you know what, I went and bought it as it was actually on sale here in Frankfurt in the English Dept. of a named bookstore. My mistake. Try explaining to fellow commuters on the 6:20 a.m. to Frankfurt, who see and greet you every morning, and have done so for the last 35 years or more but haven't the foggiest idea of one's previous life, just why you are sniggering in unabashed mood at some garishly-coloured paperback concerning the baudy-side of life at sea...and to top it all, in English! Don't do this to me Baboulene, I have a reputation to uphold!

I also spent time on the W.African coast with a Gerry outfit around 78/79. I was professional 2M at the time and when at anchor in Lagos Roads I was 'armed' in the early hours with a Schermuly rocket pistol which was to deter the influx of 'whites of eyes' should they appear over the gunwale in order to crack a box or two on deck.....which they invariably did anyway. I think back sometimes and wonder if I'd ever've had the guts to fire that thing in spite, or nobble somebody with a pick-axe handle!
Can relate to the graceful excursion into the Congolese bushes albeit far further north and during a Kiel Canal transit. Pilot was also at fault....he was prattling on at me about his family life in the early hours such that I, as 1/O and helmsman, forgot to turn left at the next corner. Shiiiit happens.

Still only halfway through your escapades and enjoying every page! We didn't have half-so-much fun in port as Apprentices / Officers on tankers but sea life in general, whether Bank Line or BP Tankers, has certainly shaped our lives.

Gonna have to find myself a secluded seat in the morning for the 'tale of the Quikfit Chessmen'

(Thumb)

Windy
9th July 2009, 22:44
Thanks for the kind words, blokies. Much appreciated.

The big news for me is that I'm on Radio 4 on Saturday (12th July 09). Excess Baggage about 10.00am. The show is themed on travelling on cargo ships as passengers.

I wasn't nervous, even at the prospect of being interviewed by the wonderful Sandi Toksvig, or even when they told me there were 1.4m listeners, but when they told me they were sending a BBC car for me, I've been feeling all weird ever since...

Cheers!

Windy B

rabaul
11th July 2009, 18:40
I enjoyed your turn on radio 4 this morning your description of pirates in Nigeria mirrored my own - good luck with the book sales.

stay well

Bill

callpor
31st December 2010, 16:53
Hey Paul,

In case you are concerned about parting with the money, I can absolutely and utterly assure you that David Baboulene's new book, Jumping Ships, is damn excellent. Hilarious. Worth every penny. Don't wait another moment.

And his first one was top notch too. You should buy both. They also make great presents.

Hope this helps.

Best regards.

David Baboulene

Windy,

I bought both your books and have just finished reading them. They were a really great read and thoroughly enjoyed hearing all your escapades on what were obvioulsy Bankline vessels.

They brought back a lot of nostalgia from my own apprenticeship with a different company some 12 or so years earlier than you. One thing that mystifies me though is that you appeared to have so much money. In the Company I served my time with all the Apprentices were always broke. If I recall correctly when I started we got about 2.10s per week and finished my time on the princly sum of 25 per month. We could never afford a case of beer (were only allowed 2 cans per day anyway) and were always looking for ways to supplement our income. On the NZ and Auzzie coast we got shore based wages whilst prepaing holds for reefer cargoes and occasionally when off duty signed-on with the warfie union to work evening shifts with a gang, sometimes even on our own vessel.

I'm looking forward to your third book in this series. When can this be expected to appear?

Regards,

Chris Allport